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Displaying items by tag: Volvo Round Ireland 2018

#dublinbay - An illustrated lecture: “Man Overboard Recovery-Volvo Round Ireland 2018" is to be presented next week in Dublin by John White and Kenneth Rumball.

This final lecture in the present series, organised by Friends of Glenua is to be held on Thursday 25 April at 8pm. The venue as usual will be held at the Poolbeg Yacht and Boat Club located in Ringsend on Pigeon House Road.

There will be an entry contribution of €5 in aid of the RNLI.

Background on lecture

One o'clock in the morning of 2nd of July 2018, 30+ knots of a northerly wind off the Blasket Islands, pitch black, wild rain and freezing temperatures, and the call goes out "Man Overboard". The man swept overboard was John White, one of a crew of seven on board Jedi, with Kenneth Rumball, James Gunn, John White, Philip Connor, Lorcan Tighe, Kylie McMillan, Diarmuid McLaughlin and skippered by Michael Boyd.

Fortunately, the very experienced and highly competitive skipper and crew, were well prepared for the 2018 Round Ireland Yacht Race. John was recovered quickly and efficiently and participated fully in the rest of the race.

Still there are lessons to be learned from their first-hand experience. John and Kenny will share these in their illustrated presentation which has already been received enthusiastically by fellow sailors in other sailing clubs. On the eve of a new sailing season, it’s a timely reminder that bad sailing conditions are a threat to the best of crews requiring thorough preparation in boat skills and modern technology.

Published in Dublin Bay

Dublin Bay

Dublin Bay on the east coast of Ireland stretches over seven kilometres, from Howth Head on its northern tip to Dalkey Island in the south. It's a place most Dubliners simply take for granted, and one of the capital's least visited places. But there's more going on out there than you'd imagine.

The biggest boating centre is at Dun Laoghaire Harbour on the Bay's south shore that is home to over 1,500 pleasure craft, four waterfront yacht clubs and Ireland's largest marina.

The bay is rather shallow with many sandbanks and rocky outcrops, and was notorious in the past for shipwrecks, especially when the wind was from the east. Until modern times, many ships and their passengers were lost along the treacherous coastline from Howth to Dun Laoghaire, less than a kilometre from shore. 

The Bay is a C-shaped inlet of the Irish Sea and is about 10 kilometres wide along its north-south base, and 7 km in length to its apex at the centre of the city of Dublin; stretching from Howth Head in the north to Dalkey Point in the south. North Bull Island is situated in the northwest part of the bay, where one of two major inshore sandbanks lie, and features a 5 km long sandy beach, Dollymount Strand, fronting an internationally recognised wildfowl reserve. Many of the rivers of Dublin reach the Irish Sea at Dublin Bay: the River Liffey, with the River Dodder flow received less than 1 km inland, River Tolka, and various smaller rivers and streams.