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Dublin Bay Boating News and Information

Displaying items by tag: Waterways Ireland

Waterways Ireland advises inland waterways users that essential maintenance works are taking place on the rail bridge over the Grand Canal west of Tullamore until further notice. The maximum safe air draft for passing vessels is 3.2m (10.4ft).

Published in Inland Waterways

The Irish Times reports that Waterways Ireland has confirmed plans to sell off the heritage graving docks at Dublin’s Grand Canal Dock.

The inland waterways authority says it is “currently considering a range of options” regarding the sale of the site, which is one of the last undeveloped land parcels of the Docklands Strategic Development Zone.

Dating from the 1790s, the dry docks have most recently hosted the base of operations for Viking Splash Tours — purchased last month by a Liverpool firm after facing liquidation amid continued pandemic restrictions — as well as the historic former Aran Islands ferry Naomh Éanna.

Four years ago, suggestions that Waterways Ireland had been planning to sell what’s regarded as a key piece of the canal basin’s Georgian architecture prompted a local activist group to appeal to the then Heritage Minister to intervene.

And campaigners have again expressed their dismay, claiming that Waterways Ireland has “reneged on previous assurances” that the docks would be restored for the benefit of the local community.

The Irish Times has more on the story HERE.

Published in Dublin Port

Waterways Ireland advises that emergency repair works to the lock gates at Tarmonbarry on the Shannon Navigation will take place from Monday 8 March to Wednesday 28 April.

Passage through Tarmonbarry Lock in Co Roscommon will not be possible during this seven-week-plus period as the inland waterway here will be closed.

An alternative route via the Camlin River (subject to Government COVID-19 restrictions) will be available during the works.

Masters of vessels and inland are advised to check their airdraft prior to undertaking the passage on the Camlin River due to the low bridge on the N5 road.

Published in Inland Waterways

Waterways Ireland advises of essential diving and engineering works on the Shannon Headrace Canal between Ardnacrusha Power Station and Parteen Weir.

The works — which were set to commence yesterday, Monday 15 February — are being carried out on a section of the embankment between Clonlara and Blackwater Bridges until Monday 15 March.

The Headrace Canal will remain open during these works and buoys/markers will be placed in the canal to highlight the works area.

Inland waterways users are asked to maintain due attention when traversing this section of the Shannon and to maintain their distance from the works.

Published in Inland Waterways

Waterways Ireland invites expressions of interest to operate a watersport activity business at the Enniskillen Blueway Water Activity Zone in the Co Fermanagh town.

Forms and information packs are available from [email protected] and the closing date for submissions is Friday 26 February at 2pm GMT.

Published in Inland Waterways

Waterways Ireland has appointed John McDonagh as its new chief executive officer following a meeting of the North South Ministerial Council on Wednesday 3 February.

McDonagh will take up a four-year appointment, having previously acted as the interim CEO of Waterways Ireland since April 2019.

Commenting on his appointment and his future vision for the organisation, McDonagh said: “I am pleased to be given the opportunity to lead Waterways Ireland and to continue the journey towards a pathway to growth.

“It is important we keep looking forward and prepare for the future. I envision Waterways Ireland creating inspirational inland navigations through conservation and sustainable development for the benefit of all.

“I am enthusiastic about future developmental opportunities to build upon our natural and built assets to grow the social, economic and environmental well-being value of our navigation waterways in both Northern Ireland and Ireland.”

Waterways Ireland says that since he joined the organisation, McDonagh has concentrated on addressing the key strategic challenges of leadership and organisational capacity gaps; strengthening organisational governance, risk and controls; and focusing on the development of a strategic long-term plan.

He is positioning Waterways Ireland to be a dynamic, purposeful organisation for all users and stakeholders, the organisation says.

Prior to his appointment in Waterways Ireland, John McDonagh spent much of his career in senior roles such as retail director and country manager in Shell Ireland. More recently, he was sales and marketing director with Liberty Insurance where he was responsible for an award-winning brand launch in Ireland. Throughout his long career, he has also consulted across multiple sectors.

McDonagh is an English and History graduate from UCD and he holds a Master’s in Finance. He lives in Sligo and commutes to Waterways Ireland HQ in Enniskillen.

Published in Inland Waterways

Waterways Ireland notifies towpath users that sections of the towpath on the Lough Owel feeder of the Royal Canal from Mullingar Harbour to Fish Farm at Cullion will be closed periodically from today, Monday 8 February, until Friday 19 February for essential maintenance works.

Published in Inland Waterways

Waterways Ireland advises that Portora Lock on the Erne System near Enniskillen will be closed to boat traffic on Tuesday 19 and Wednesday 20 January to accommodate essential maintenance works to the lock gates.

Masters of vessels on this inland waterway are asked to heed all instructions from safety personnel who will be in the area.

Published in Inland Waterways

Waterways Ireland advises towpath users that site investigation works have commenced on the Royal Canal towpath between Phibsborough and Ashtown and will continue until March 2021.

Dublin City Council have classified these as part of critical infrastructure works so they will also continue over the current period of increased Covid-19 restrictions.

The towpath will remain open but users should exercise due care and caution when passing any vehicles or plant machinery along the path.

Published in Inland Waterways

Waterways Ireland advises masters of vessels that essential diving operations will take place on behalf of Leitrim County Council at Carrick-on-Shannon tomorrow, Monday 11 January, from 11am to 2pm.

Following on from dives scheduled for last month, locations of the diving operations are along the quay wall some 30 metres downstream and upstream of the bridge, and along the quay wall near the boat club.

Masters of vessels on the Shannon Navigation and all inland waterways users are requested to proceed with additional caution in the vicinity of these diving operations.

Published in Diving
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Dublin Bay

Dublin Bay on the east coast of Ireland stretches over seven kilometres, from Howth Head on its northern tip to Dalkey Island in the south. It's a place most Dubliners simply take for granted, and one of the capital's least visited places. But there's more going on out there than you'd imagine.

The biggest boating centre is at Dun Laoghaire Harbour on the Bay's south shore that is home to over 1,500 pleasure craft, four waterfront yacht clubs and Ireland's largest marina.

The bay is rather shallow with many sandbanks and rocky outcrops, and was notorious in the past for shipwrecks, especially when the wind was from the east. Until modern times, many ships and their passengers were lost along the treacherous coastline from Howth to Dun Laoghaire, less than a kilometre from shore.

The Bay is a C-shaped inlet of the Irish Sea and is about 10 kilometres wide along its north-south base, and 7 km in length to its apex at the centre of the city of Dublin; stretching from Howth Head in the north to Dalkey Point in the south. North Bull Island is situated in the northwest part of the bay, where one of two major inshore sandbanks lie, and features a 5 km long sandy beach, Dollymount Strand, fronting an internationally recognised wildfowl reserve. Many of the rivers of Dublin reach the Irish Sea at Dublin Bay: the River Liffey, with the River Dodder flow received less than 1 km inland, River Tolka, and various smaller rivers and streams.

Dublin Bay FAQs

There are approximately ten beaches and bathing spots around Dublin Bay: Dollymount Strand; Forty Foot Bathing Place; Half Moon bathing spot; Merrion Strand; Bull Wall; Sandycove Beach; Sandymount Strand; Seapoint; Shelley Banks; Sutton, Burrow Beach

There are slipways on the north side of Dublin Bay at Clontarf, Sutton and on the southside at Dun Laoghaire Harbour, and in Dalkey at Coliemore and Bulloch Harbours.

Dublin Bay is administered by a number of Government Departments, three local authorities and several statutory agencies. Dublin Port Company is in charge of navigation on the Bay.

Dublin Bay is approximately 70 sq kilometres or 7,000 hectares. The Bay is about 10 kilometres wide along its north-south base, and seven km in length east-west to its peak at the centre of the city of Dublin; stretching from Howth Head in the north to Dalkey Point in the south.

Dun Laoghaire Harbour on the southside of the Bay has an East and West Pier, each one kilometre long; this is one of the largest human-made harbours in the world. There also piers or walls at the entrance to the River Liffey at Dublin city known as the Great North and South Walls. Other harbours on the Bay include Bulloch Harbour and Coliemore Harbours both at Dalkey.

There are two marinas on Dublin Bay. Ireland's largest marina with over 800 berths is on the southern shore at Dun Laoghaire Harbour. The other is at Poolbeg Yacht and Boat Club on the River Liffey close to Dublin City.

Car and passenger Ferries operate from Dublin Port to the UK, Isle of Man and France. A passenger ferry operates from Dun Laoghaire Harbour to Howth as well as providing tourist voyages around the bay.

Dublin Bay has two Islands. Bull Island at Clontarf and Dalkey Island on the southern shore of the Bay.

The River Liffey flows through Dublin city and into the Bay. Its tributaries include the River Dodder, the River Poddle and the River Camac.

Dollymount, Burrow and Seapoint beaches

Approximately 1,500 boats from small dinghies to motorboats to ocean-going yachts. The vast majority, over 1,000, are moored at Dun Laoghaire Harbour which is Ireland's boating capital.

In 1981, UNESCO recognised the importance of Dublin Bay by designating North Bull Island as a Biosphere because of its rare and internationally important habitats and species of wildlife. To support sustainable development, UNESCO’s concept of a Biosphere has evolved to include not just areas of ecological value but also the areas around them and the communities that live and work within these areas. There have since been additional international and national designations, covering much of Dublin Bay, to ensure the protection of its water quality and biodiversity. To fulfil these broader management aims for the ecosystem, the Biosphere was expanded in 2015. The Biosphere now covers Dublin Bay, reflecting its significant environmental, economic, cultural and tourism importance, and extends to over 300km² to include the bay, the shore and nearby residential areas.

On the Southside at Dun Laoghaire, there is the National Yacht Club, Royal St. George Yacht Club, Royal Irish Yacht Club and Dun Laoghaire Motor Yacht Club as well as Dublin Bay Sailing Club. In the city centre, there is Poolbeg Yacht and Boat Club. On the Northside of Dublin, there is Clontarf Yacht and Boat Club and Sutton Dinghy Club. While not on Dublin Bay, Howth Yacht Club is the major north Dublin Sailing centre.

© Afloat 2020