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Dublin Bay Boating News and Information

Displaying items by tag: Waterways Ireland

Waterways Ireland advises masters and owners of vessels that Lock C7 on the Grand Canal at Portobello is temporarily closed for essential maintenance. Passage through the lock will not be possible until repairs are completed on Monday 7 September.

Published in Inland Waterways

Waterways Ireland has issued notice that it plans to remove vessels in contravention of bye-laws from the Grand Canal in the area between Hazelhatch and Sallins in Co Kildare later this month.

Vessels that appear abandoned or have no no permit (as per Bye Law 6(8), are doubled moored and/or causing obstruction (sunk) (Bye Law 27 (3)), or are deemed to be/likely to cause a hazard to navigation (Bye-Law 33(3)) will be removed from the inland waterway at Sallins, Lowtown, Robertstown and Hazelhatch and environs at Monday 28 September or shortly thereafter.

Removed vessels may then be subsequently disposed of in accordance with Bye Law 34(2), which allows for this where vessels are unclamped or due compensation has not been paid with a month.

Affected vessels have been stickered where access allows and owners, where known, have been contacted, Waterways Ireland says.

Published in Inland Waterways

Waterways Ireland advises masters and users of vessels on the Royal Canal that the inland waterway is closed between Balroe and Ballynacarrigy in Co Westmeath.

Navigation will be prohibited between the 34th and 35th locks for the next two weeks to facilitate emergency repairs to the embankment following this past week’s poor weather.

Published in Inland Waterways

Instream works to install floating jetties downstream of Roosky Bridge on the Shannon Navigation have begun this week and will continue until Wednesday 30 September.

Waterways Ireland advises that delays to bridge lifts and lock operations on the inland waterway are to be expected during the six weeks of works.

Published in Inland Waterways

Waterways Ireland has announced the reopening of Lock 15 on the Shannon-Erne Waterway at Tirmactiernan in Co Leitrim as of Thursday 27 August after a temporary closure for safety reasons.

The lock has been closed due to the high volume and velocity of water exiting the back channel downstream of the lock.

Published in Inland Waterways

Waterways Ireland’s jetties have reopened at Clonmacnoise, Shannonbridge, Shannon Harbour and Banagher on the Shannon Navigation following the lifting of coronavirus restrictions on counties Laois and Offaly.

Meanwhile, visiting moorings on the Grand and Royal Canals, Barrow Navigation and Barrow Line in Co Kildare will remain closed as restrictions remain in place for the county for another two weeks.

Waterways Ireland said it strongly encourages people to strictly observe social distancing measures throughout its network of inland waterways.

“We are asking our users not to congregate, to keep moving, and allow ample space for others to pass in accordance with social distancing protocols,” it added.

Elsewhere, weed cutting operations are under way at Portna and Movanagher on the Lower Bann from today, Monday 24 to Friday 28 August.

Boaters in these areas are advised to approach with caution, reduce speed and follow any instructions or signage.

On Lough Derg, water users are advised to proceed with caution in the vicinity of Goat’s Road as the green E Buoy is currently off station at Bellvue Eoint.

And the public mooring at Leitrim village has been closed for a Garda investigation into a tragic incident in the early hours of Sunday 23 August.

Alternate moorings are available below the bridge in Leitrim village and at Lock 16 on the Shannon-Erne Waterway.

Published in Inland Waterways

Waterways Ireland has given notice of upcoming closures on the Lower Bann in Co Antrim and the Grand Canal in Dublin.

On-location filming will see the Lower Bann closed to all boat traffic from the downstream side of Portglenone Bridge to Aghahoy Jetty on Saturday 5 September from 9am to 4pm, and again on Tuesday 8 September from 7am to 7pm.

Safety boats will be on the waterway and users are requested to follow the instructions of the safety boat crews.

Then later in the month in Dublin, levels C3 & C4 on the Grand Canal will be closed to navigation from 21 September for repair works on Lock C4 at Mespil Road.

As a result, no further boat passages into or out of Dublin past these levels will be possible from that date for the remainder of the 2020 boating season, and local boat movements through these locks will not be allowed until late December.

There will also be restrictions to pedestrian movements in the area of Lock C4 due to the ongoing works.

Published in Inland Waterways

Waterways Ireland advises users of the Barrow Navigation that the towpath will be closed in two locations to facilitate works on the Barrow Blueway.

The sections between Milltown Bridge, Athy and Ballymanus Bridge in Vicarstown, and between the 20th Lock in Ballteague and 22nd Lock in Glenaree will be inaccessible for several weeks to allow for the blueway upgrade works.

As previously reported on Afloat.ie, the proposed upgrade aims to improve access to the Barrow Way, both on and along the water, offering an enhanced experience to walkers, cyclists, wheelchairs users, paddlers and families.

Published in Inland Waterways

Waterways Ireland is part of a new Government campaign promoting responsible behaviour when enjoying the outdoors and help turn back a recent increase in litter hotspots, particularly in scenic locations.

​Love This Place, Leave No Trace is a joint initiative with Leave No Trace Ireland alongside the National Parks and Wildlife Service, Inland Fisheries Ireland, Fáilte Ireland, Coillte and the OPW.

The campaign comes after what’s been described as “a notable increase” in littering throughout the country in recent weeks since the easing of coronavirus-related movement restrictions.

“We need to take action now to halt the scourge of litter in our beautiful countryside,” said Maura Kiely, chief executive of Leave No Trace Ireland.

“Everyone needs to take responsibility. Littering is a threat to our fragile ecosystems and a moment of laziness can have long-term effects.

“An aluminium can takes 400 to 500 years to break down; a plastic bag can take up to 20 years. A discarded plastic bottle, meanwhile, will last for a million years.”

‘As more of us ‘make a break for it in Ireland’ this year, let’s respect the environment which is one of Ireland's greatest assets’

Catherine Martin, Minister for Media, Tourism, Arts, Culture, Sport and the Gaeltacht, welcomed the new campaign.

“We all love to exercise and be active in our scenic outdoor spaces so let’s ensure they remain accessible to all by Leaving No Trace and keeping our natural environment litter-free.

“As more of us ‘make a break for it in Ireland’ this year, let’s respect the environment which is one of Ireland's greatest assets.”

Minister of State for Heritage and Electoral Reform, Malcolm Noonan, added: “Litter, disturbance to vegetation, water pollution, wildlife, livestock and other people are all indicators of the need to develop a national ethic that protects both natural and cultural heritage.

“I would encourage everyone to treat our natural heritage with the respect it deserves and to follow the principles of Leave No Trace.”

Leave No Trace issued its guidelines on how to be responsible in the outdoors earlier this year — and further details, including outdoor skills and tips for planning, are available from Leave No Trace Ireland HERE.

Published in News Update

Waterways Ireland has closed a number of jetties and visitor moorings on its inland waterways in counties Laois, Offaly and Kildare due to the localised coronavirus restrictions imposed by the Government from yesterday evening, Friday 7 August.

The affected jetties are Clonmacnoise, Shannonbridge, Shannon Harbour and Banagher on Shannon Navigation, while visitor moorings on the Grand Canal, Royal Canal, Barrow Navigation and Barrow Line in the affected counties are also closed for at least the next two weeks.

Locks and facilities on all other parts of the Shannon Navigation, Grand and Royal Canals, Barrow Navigation and Barrow Line are unaffected at present and remain open, but Waterways Ireland strongly encourages people to strictly observe social distancing measures.

Meanwhile, the Waterways Ireland quays at Connaught Harbour in Portumna will be used as an operations base for Carrickcraft and Silverline vessels from today, Saturday 8 August. Limited mooring space will be available at Connaught Harbour for a two-week period.

Page 4 of 32

Dublin Bay

Dublin Bay on the east coast of Ireland stretches over seven kilometres, from Howth Head on its northern tip to Dalkey Island in the south. It's a place most Dubliners simply take for granted, and one of the capital's least visited places. But there's more going on out there than you'd imagine.

The biggest boating centre is at Dun Laoghaire Harbour on the Bay's south shore that is home to over 1,500 pleasure craft, four waterfront yacht clubs and Ireland's largest marina.

The bay is rather shallow with many sandbanks and rocky outcrops, and was notorious in the past for shipwrecks, especially when the wind was from the east. Until modern times, many ships and their passengers were lost along the treacherous coastline from Howth to Dun Laoghaire, less than a kilometre from shore.

The Bay is a C-shaped inlet of the Irish Sea and is about 10 kilometres wide along its north-south base, and 7 km in length to its apex at the centre of the city of Dublin; stretching from Howth Head in the north to Dalkey Point in the south. North Bull Island is situated in the northwest part of the bay, where one of two major inshore sandbanks lie, and features a 5 km long sandy beach, Dollymount Strand, fronting an internationally recognised wildfowl reserve. Many of the rivers of Dublin reach the Irish Sea at Dublin Bay: the River Liffey, with the River Dodder flow received less than 1 km inland, River Tolka, and various smaller rivers and streams.

Dublin Bay FAQs

There are approximately ten beaches and bathing spots around Dublin Bay: Dollymount Strand; Forty Foot Bathing Place; Half Moon bathing spot; Merrion Strand; Bull Wall; Sandycove Beach; Sandymount Strand; Seapoint; Shelley Banks; Sutton, Burrow Beach

There are slipways on the north side of Dublin Bay at Clontarf, Sutton and on the southside at Dun Laoghaire Harbour, and in Dalkey at Coliemore and Bulloch Harbours.

Dublin Bay is administered by a number of Government Departments, three local authorities and several statutory agencies. Dublin Port Company is in charge of navigation on the Bay.

Dublin Bay is approximately 70 sq kilometres or 7,000 hectares. The Bay is about 10 kilometres wide along its north-south base, and seven km in length east-west to its peak at the centre of the city of Dublin; stretching from Howth Head in the north to Dalkey Point in the south.

Dun Laoghaire Harbour on the southside of the Bay has an East and West Pier, each one kilometre long; this is one of the largest human-made harbours in the world. There also piers or walls at the entrance to the River Liffey at Dublin city known as the Great North and South Walls. Other harbours on the Bay include Bulloch Harbour and Coliemore Harbours both at Dalkey.

There are two marinas on Dublin Bay. Ireland's largest marina with over 800 berths is on the southern shore at Dun Laoghaire Harbour. The other is at Poolbeg Yacht and Boat Club on the River Liffey close to Dublin City.

Car and passenger Ferries operate from Dublin Port to the UK, Isle of Man and France. A passenger ferry operates from Dun Laoghaire Harbour to Howth as well as providing tourist voyages around the bay.

Dublin Bay has two Islands. Bull Island at Clontarf and Dalkey Island on the southern shore of the Bay.

The River Liffey flows through Dublin city and into the Bay. Its tributaries include the River Dodder, the River Poddle and the River Camac.

Dollymount, Burrow and Seapoint beaches

Approximately 1,500 boats from small dinghies to motorboats to ocean-going yachts. The vast majority, over 1,000, are moored at Dun Laoghaire Harbour which is Ireland's boating capital.

In 1981, UNESCO recognised the importance of Dublin Bay by designating North Bull Island as a Biosphere because of its rare and internationally important habitats and species of wildlife. To support sustainable development, UNESCO’s concept of a Biosphere has evolved to include not just areas of ecological value but also the areas around them and the communities that live and work within these areas. There have since been additional international and national designations, covering much of Dublin Bay, to ensure the protection of its water quality and biodiversity. To fulfil these broader management aims for the ecosystem, the Biosphere was expanded in 2015. The Biosphere now covers Dublin Bay, reflecting its significant environmental, economic, cultural and tourism importance, and extends to over 300km² to include the bay, the shore and nearby residential areas.

On the Southside at Dun Laoghaire, there is the National Yacht Club, Royal St. George Yacht Club, Royal Irish Yacht Club and Dun Laoghaire Motor Yacht Club as well as Dublin Bay Sailing Club. In the city centre, there is Poolbeg Yacht and Boat Club. On the Northside of Dublin, there is Clontarf Yacht and Boat Club and Sutton Dinghy Club. While not on Dublin Bay, Howth Yacht Club is the major north Dublin Sailing centre.

© Afloat 2020

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