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Dublin Bay Boating News and Information

Displaying items by tag: Watrerways Ireland

#Riverfest - Avid fans of watersports from across the UK & Ireland will descend on Coleraine on 9-10 August when the Waterways Ireland Riverfest takes place on the Lower Bann River and Christie Park.

On the water, wakeboarding, jetskiing and bare-footing demos will run throughout the day each day with competitive stand-up paddle boarding and sailing, rowing and angling all in the packed family fun programme.

Off the water, an inflatable fun area welcomes kids of all ages, alongside climbing walls, a boat and motor-home display, food and retail areas and the all-Ireland u90kg Strong Man and Strong Woman finals.

Sponsored by Waterways Ireland and supported by Coleraine Borough Council, the event runs 10.30am to 6pm on the Saturday and 12.30pm to 6pm on the Sunday and is free for all the family.

"The Waterways Ireland Riverfest in Coleraine receives our support because it engages more families, young people in waterway recreation in a spectacular and innovative fashion, leading the way with a range of events and activities you cannot experience elsewhere," said Waterways Ireland chief executive Dawn Livingstone.

"Thousands of people have enjoyed the Riverfest and have become great enthusiasts for their watersport and ambassadors for the event, the Lower Bann and Coleraine."

Rob Skelly, owner of The Edge Watersports in Coleraine and one of the event organisers, added: "The Waterways Ireland Riverfest has been a phenomenal success since we launched eight years ago. For 2014, the line-up will be bigger and better cementing its reputation as one of the best watersports events across the UK and Ireland.

"The natural waterway of the Lower River Bann provides a wonderful platform and backdrop for the magnificent displays. Once again we are delighted to be working alongside Waterways Ireland who is as ever supportive and actively promoting recreational opportunities on the inland waterways.

"Coleraine Borough Council are avid supporters of the event contributing since the events inception both financially and with some valued in-kind support, which has assisted the festival extend its land based offering to visitors on this idyllic site adjacent to the River Bann."

Mayor of Coleraine George Duddy met with the festival team by the River Bann to see for himself the wealth of entertainment planned for this year's event.

"Coleraine Borough Council has continued to support the development of this event as it attracts residents and visitors to an important location in the town," he said. "The River Bann provides the focus to this free family fun day, which is a great weekend for families of all ages, while supporting the local businesses to showcase the town for shoppers.

"I look forward to this year's event and congratulate all the teams involved in continuing to develop the Waterways Ireland Riverfest programme, as a significant attraction in the Borough's calendar of events."

For further information click on the Waterways Ireland Riverfest​ events page on Facebook HERE.

Published in Maritime Festivals

Dublin Bay

Dublin Bay on the east coast of Ireland stretches over seven kilometres, from Howth Head on its northern tip to Dalkey Island in the south. It's a place most Dubliners simply take for granted, and one of the capital's least visited places. But there's more going on out there than you'd imagine.

The biggest boating centre is at Dun Laoghaire Harbour on the Bay's south shore that is home to over 1,500 pleasure craft, four waterfront yacht clubs and Ireland's largest marina.

The bay is rather shallow with many sandbanks and rocky outcrops, and was notorious in the past for shipwrecks, especially when the wind was from the east. Until modern times, many ships and their passengers were lost along the treacherous coastline from Howth to Dun Laoghaire, less than a kilometre from shore.

The Bay is a C-shaped inlet of the Irish Sea and is about 10 kilometres wide along its north-south base, and 7 km in length to its apex at the centre of the city of Dublin; stretching from Howth Head in the north to Dalkey Point in the south. North Bull Island is situated in the northwest part of the bay, where one of two major inshore sandbanks lie, and features a 5 km long sandy beach, Dollymount Strand, fronting an internationally recognised wildfowl reserve. Many of the rivers of Dublin reach the Irish Sea at Dublin Bay: the River Liffey, with the River Dodder flow received less than 1 km inland, River Tolka, and various smaller rivers and streams.

Dublin Bay FAQs

There are approximately ten beaches and bathing spots around Dublin Bay: Dollymount Strand; Forty Foot Bathing Place; Half Moon bathing spot; Merrion Strand; Bull Wall; Sandycove Beach; Sandymount Strand; Seapoint; Shelley Banks; Sutton, Burrow Beach

There are slipways on the north side of Dublin Bay at Clontarf, Sutton and on the southside at Dun Laoghaire Harbour, and in Dalkey at Coliemore and Bulloch Harbours.

Dublin Bay is administered by a number of Government Departments, three local authorities and several statutory agencies. Dublin Port Company is in charge of navigation on the Bay.

Dublin Bay is approximately 70 sq kilometres or 7,000 hectares. The Bay is about 10 kilometres wide along its north-south base, and seven km in length east-west to its peak at the centre of the city of Dublin; stretching from Howth Head in the north to Dalkey Point in the south.

Dun Laoghaire Harbour on the southside of the Bay has an East and West Pier, each one kilometre long; this is one of the largest human-made harbours in the world. There also piers or walls at the entrance to the River Liffey at Dublin city known as the Great North and South Walls. Other harbours on the Bay include Bulloch Harbour and Coliemore Harbours both at Dalkey.

There are two marinas on Dublin Bay. Ireland's largest marina with over 800 berths is on the southern shore at Dun Laoghaire Harbour. The other is at Poolbeg Yacht and Boat Club on the River Liffey close to Dublin City.

Car and passenger Ferries operate from Dublin Port to the UK, Isle of Man and France. A passenger ferry operates from Dun Laoghaire Harbour to Howth as well as providing tourist voyages around the bay.

Dublin Bay has two Islands. Bull Island at Clontarf and Dalkey Island on the southern shore of the Bay.

The River Liffey flows through Dublin city and into the Bay. Its tributaries include the River Dodder, the River Poddle and the River Camac.

Dollymount, Burrow and Seapoint beaches

Approximately 1,500 boats from small dinghies to motorboats to ocean-going yachts. The vast majority, over 1,000, are moored at Dun Laoghaire Harbour which is Ireland's boating capital.

In 1981, UNESCO recognised the importance of Dublin Bay by designating North Bull Island as a Biosphere because of its rare and internationally important habitats and species of wildlife. To support sustainable development, UNESCO’s concept of a Biosphere has evolved to include not just areas of ecological value but also the areas around them and the communities that live and work within these areas. There have since been additional international and national designations, covering much of Dublin Bay, to ensure the protection of its water quality and biodiversity. To fulfil these broader management aims for the ecosystem, the Biosphere was expanded in 2015. The Biosphere now covers Dublin Bay, reflecting its significant environmental, economic, cultural and tourism importance, and extends to over 300km² to include the bay, the shore and nearby residential areas.

On the Southside at Dun Laoghaire, there is the National Yacht Club, Royal St. George Yacht Club, Royal Irish Yacht Club and Dun Laoghaire Motor Yacht Club as well as Dublin Bay Sailing Club. In the city centre, there is Poolbeg Yacht and Boat Club. On the Northside of Dublin, there is Clontarf Yacht and Boat Club and Sutton Dinghy Club. While not on Dublin Bay, Howth Yacht Club is the major north Dublin Sailing centre.

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