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Allianz and Afloat - Supporting Irish Boating

Ireland's sailing, boating & maritime magazine

Dublin Bay Boating News and Information

Displaying items by tag: Wexford

#Wexford - Wexford RNLI recovered the body of man last night (Saturday 22 November) following a 90-minute search operation after reports of a man who had fallen from his boat at the Crescent at Wexford Quay.

The lifeboat launched at 4.23pm seconds after the alert by the Irish Coast Guard. Its volunteer lifeboat crew were already in their full kit with the lifeboat on the slip as they had just come back to the station following an exercise.

Within a minute the lifeboat was on scene, where they were given reports of the person's location. A lifeboat crew member entered the water and the crew performed extensive searching of the area, assisted by local vessels from Wexford Harbour Boat and Tennis Club. 
 


Coastguard helicopter Rescue 117, Rosslare and Curracloe Coast Guard and Garda units joined in the search, with divers from Slaney Search and Rescue arriving on scene when the man's body was found. 
 


Wexford RNLI lifeboat crew recovered the casualty at 6.10pm and brought him back to Wexford lifeboat station. 

The Irish Times reports that the man is thought to have lost his footing while on a boat and slipped into the water.

Published in News Update
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#RNLI - Two people were rescued by Wexford RNLI in the early hours of Friday morning (3 October) after one was seen entering the water in the county town's harbour and another, a trained lifeguard, entered to assist.

  1. The volunteer crew was alerted at 1.29am and the lifeboat launched within six minutes of the pagers going off.

Both men were rescued alongside Wexford Quay and brought back to Wexford lifeboat station, where a HSE ambulance was waiting.

Speaking after the incident, a spokesperson for Wexford RNLI said: "The quick response by the lifeguard, Gardaí and lifeboat saved lives last night.

"If anyone see someone in distress in the water they should ring the coastguard on 112 or 999 which will ensure the fastest response by the Wexford lifeboat."

Published in RNLI Lifeboats
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#fireball – The 16-boat Fireball fleet for the Munsters have had a very challenging 4 race programme today with light variable winds and lots of snakes and ladders racing writes Cormac Bradley. Very few boats don't have one big number on their scorecard and Noel Butler & Stephen Oram (15061) are the only boat in the top five who don't. A 3, 3, 2, 2 score line leaves them in 2nd place behind Barry McCartin & Conor Kinsella (15114) who have scored 1, 6, 1, 4. In third place we find Kenneth Rumball & David Moran (15058) with a 8, 4, 4, 3 record for the day.
Ben Scallan & Ronan Wallace of the home club, sailing 14820 are fourth with a 4, 1, 7, 8 return and fifth overall is Andrew Boyle & Alexander Rumball who won the last race of the day to add to their 5, 9, 13 tally.

Published in Fireball
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#RNLI - Wexford RNLI came to the rescue of a woman who sustained a leg injury off the Point of Park yesterday (Friday 20 June).

The lifeboat launched at 11.44am and was on scene at 11.47am. Volunteer lifeboat crew member Matt Crispin, who is also an advanced paramedic, administered first aid on the lifeboat.

The woman was then brought to Wexford lifeboat station before being transferred to a HSE ambulance and taken to Wexford General Hospital.

  1. RNLI helm David Maguire commented on the skills of the volunteer lifeboat crew: "With an advanced paramedic and three advanced first aid crew on board, the woman was in safe hands."

Crew on the call-out included helm David Maguire, Matt Crispin, Frank O'Brien and Martin Conway.

Elsewhere, it was a busy Thursday evening for Lough Ree RNLI on 19 June when they received three lifeboat callouts in succession.

The first call for help was made at 4.25pm by a sailing boat standing by a cruiser on the rocks on the Long Shoal. The Lough Ree lifeboat was launched at 4.33pm and was on scene 10 minutes later.

The casualty was a 38ft cruiser with two adults and three children on board. The cruiser was refloated and checked over. There was no damage and she continued on passage with two other craft in convoy.

The volunteer crew had just finished preparing the Dorothy Mary for continued service when another call-out was received at 5.20pm by the Irish Coast Guard for a cruiser aground in Blackbrink Bay.

The lifeboat was launched at 5.23pm and was on scene at 5.39pm. This time the casualty was a 32ft cruiser with five adults on board. She was refloated and examined and was able to continue her journey.

A third and final callout was received at 7.25pm, and concerned a speedboat with two adults and three children on board that had broken down while crossing the lake from Hodson Bay.

The lifeboat was launched at 7.30pm and was on scene 15 minutes later. One adult and the three children were taken on board the Dorothy Mary, which then towed the casualty, and the remaining adult, back to Hodson Bay, departing the scene at 8.21pm.

After dropping the speedboat and her party, the lifeboat crew carried out a training exercise that had been planned for that evening, arriving back at the station at 9.20pm.

Published in RNLI Lifeboats

#maritimefestival – Beachgoers to Curracloe today enjoyed the spectacle of 'Two men in a boat' as the launch for Wexford Maritime Festival got underway. The Wexford Maritime Festival was established in 2012 to celebrate Wexford's rich maritime heritage and culture and has attracted over 50,000 each year making it one of the country's biggest maritime celebrations.

The festival takes place on Wexford Quay from June 27 to 29 and the organisers of this year's jam-packed programme are expecting large crowds of over 50,000. This festival honours the memory of the founder the US Navy Commodore John Barry in his hometown of Wexford - known in the U.S. as 'Father of the American Navy.

The annual Irish Marine Search and Rescue conference and exercise demonstration will take place during the festival with heads of all Irish rescue organisations including the Irish Coast Guard, RNLI, Navy, Air Corps, HSE, Garda Siochana, Civil Defence, Irish Mountain Rescue Association, Harbour authorities, Irish Cave Rescue organization and lifeguards attending their conference on Friday.

On Saturday a major air and sea rescue demonstration will take place in full view of Wexford quay commencing with a formation of the Air Corps Casa fixed wing aircraft and Air Corp Augusta Westland 139 helicopter and the new Irish Coast Guard S92 Rescue 117. A series of 5 rescue scenarios will be demonstrated including the dropping of a life-raft from the Casa aircraft and rescue by RNLI lifeboats plus a first aid evacuation off a boat by the HSE maritime ambulance response team who will winch to a deck of a fishing trawler by the air corps helicopter.

Festival Director, Lorraine Galvin explained the emergency services connection with the festival "The Wexford Maritime Festival is organised by local Wexford RNLI crew with special events to raise money for Wexford Lifeboats. This year we are remembering the 100th anniversary of the Mexico disaster with a special maritime display by Rosslare Maritime Museum and the largest gathering of rescue organisations on Wexford quay this year."

The free family fun festival with lots of great children's activities including science workshops, arts and Viking activities and a new kid's boat stage called after Commodore Barry's most prominent ship, the USS Alliance, will come alive on Wexford quay with kids discos and games. Great art and colouring competitions with the winners getting a trip in Rescue 117 helicopter!

Wexford Food Family are going bigger and better this year with more local producers, chef demonstrations and outdoor seating area in view of the main stage where County Wexfords best performers will play live all weekend. There's lots of great water fun and races with raft races, rowing and sailing, a try it dock to try kayaking, canoeing, water skiing and a free try a dive. The largest Irish and UK model boat and aircraft display across England and Ireland with a specially constructed pond for remote control driving.

Speaking at the launch, Director David Maguire stressed the great community involvement, "The Wexford Maritime Festival showcases the very best of Wexford's maritime activities and heritage along with great local food on an amazing setting overlooking Wexfords expansive harbour. More and more local groups are coming on board each year to show off what's great about Wexford."

With over 40 events, free activities and attractions, Wexford quay is the place to be

Published in Maritime Festivals
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#Lighthouses - The world's oldest operational lighthouse is worth a visit for any tourists in the Sunny Southeast, but now anyone can take a virtual tour of the Hook Head lighthouse from the comfort of their own home - or anywhere, if you're using a laptop!

Placed at the top of Lonely Planet's list of the 'Top 10 Flashiest Lighthouses', the Hook Head light has been opened to the public as a tourist attraction each year since 2001, and is a great spot for watching whales and dolphins.

Now the breathtaking view afforded from the top of this towering fixture of the Wexford coastline can be seen from anywhere in the world. Click HERE to see for yourself!

Published in Lighthouses

#Earthquake - Just a few weeks after the Bristol Channel was stirred up by a 4.1 magnitude earthquake, TheJournal.ie reports of tremors felt in Ireland's south-east yesterday evening (18 March).

No damage has been reported on the relatively minor quake, the magnitude of which is awaiting confirmation from Irish seismologists.

But the tectonic trembling was felt in many parts of Wexford, and detected as far away as Wales across the Irish Sea.

That may put offshore sailors on alert over the coming weeks, following as it did not long after the Bristol Channel quake, not to mention a 2.6 magnitude rumble off the Cork coast late last year.

TheJournal.ie has more on the story HERE, including a link to a questionnaire for anyone who believes they felt last night's quake.

Published in News Update
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#Photography - Over €500 in prizes are to be won in a new amateur photography competition to celebrate International Wetlands Day on 2 February 2014.

Held by Wexford County Council in partnership with the Irish Ramsar Wetlands Committee, the Wonderful Wild Wetlands Photography Competition is divided into two sections, with 18s and under and over 18s categories in both:

  • ‘Wetlands in Wexford’ - a county competition where photographs may be taken in any location in Wexford
  • ‘Wetlands and Farming’ - a nationwide competition where photographs may be taken anywhere in Ireland

The value of wetlands in the Irish landscape is that they embody and sustain a substantial percentage of our natural and cultural heritage, hosting a complex interaction of water, soil, plants and animals that fulfil many basic functions and provide important ecological services as well as being places of inspiration and consolation.

The winning images will be displayed in a special Wetlands photographic exhibition to be held in the County Hall of Wexford County Council during International Wetlands Day on 2nd February 2014.

To enter, be sure to make note of the following competition guidelines:

  • All photographs must be original work, submitted as 10” (25cm) X 8” (20cm) hard copy unframed and on digitally on disc (original copies will be available for collection after exhibition)
  • Please include competition category being entered, location and date photograph was taken
  • Title, name, age (if 18 and under), address and contact telephone number on each entry
  • Maximum of 2 entries per competitor
  • 2 categories - Adult (over 18) Junior (18 and under)
  • Photographs can be in black & white or colour
  • Wexford Local Authority Employees are not eligible to enter
  • The decision of the judging panel is final
  • Please note you need a licence to take photographs of breeding birds, or any protected species, at or near their breeding site. These can be sought from www.npws.ie

The closing date for entries is Friday 17 January 2014. For submission details contact Niamh Lennon at Biodiversity & Forward Planning, Wexford County Council, County Hall, Carricklawn, Wexford or [email protected]

Published in Marine Photo

#RNLI - The search for a lobster fisherman missing off the Wexford coast was set to resume this morning after it was suspended at sunset last night.

RNLI lifeboats from Kilmore Quay, Rosslare and Fethard launched yesterday afternoon (Monday 25 November) to search for the fisherman after his boat was found empty at Shoal Rock, at the bottom of Great Saltee Island off Wexford.

The alarm was raised at 12.50pm after another fisherman in the area noticed that the boat had been stationary in the water for some time.

Kilmore Quay RNLI co-ordinated the sea search, and along with lifeboats from Rosslare and Fethard they were joined by up to 25 local boats in the search for the missing man.

The search was also joined by the Irish Coast Guard helicopter and divers from the Naval Service, who were taken to the scene onboard the Rosslare lifeboat.

Weather conditions yesterday were described as good and visibility was excellent.

Published in RNLI Lifeboats
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#Fishing - The crews of 15 fishing vessels in Wexford operated by the O'Flaherty brothers have been temporarily laid off in a dispute over regulations, as RTÉ News reports.

It's emerged that the Sea-Fisheries Protection Authority last week issued orders for all 15 boats in the O'Flaherty fishing fleet to cease operations immediately, days after two boats were recently questioned over alleged infractions of fishing regulations.

The Department of Agriculture and the Marine has not commented on the reasons for issuing cessation orders to the O'Flahertys.

Seamus O'Flaherty - one of four brothers who operate the Kilmore Quay-based fleet - was in the news this time last year when he gave away free monkfish to the public on the quayside after exceeding the EU quota with his catch.

Jimmy Byrne, skipper of the O'Flaherty-owned Saltees Quest, defended the display as a protest against the EU mandate to discard all over-quota fish at sea - a practice that is hoped will come to an end with the new Common Fisheries Policy.

Published in Fishing
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Dublin Bay

Dublin Bay on the east coast of Ireland stretches over seven kilometres, from Howth Head on its northern tip to Dalkey Island in the south. It's a place most Dubliners simply take for granted, and one of the capital's least visited places. But there's more going on out there than you'd imagine.

The biggest boating centre is at Dun Laoghaire Harbour on the Bay's south shore that is home to over 1,500 pleasure craft, four waterfront yacht clubs and Ireland's largest marina.

The bay is rather shallow with many sandbanks and rocky outcrops, and was notorious in the past for shipwrecks, especially when the wind was from the east. Until modern times, many ships and their passengers were lost along the treacherous coastline from Howth to Dun Laoghaire, less than a kilometre from shore.

The Bay is a C-shaped inlet of the Irish Sea and is about 10 kilometres wide along its north-south base, and 7 km in length to its apex at the centre of the city of Dublin; stretching from Howth Head in the north to Dalkey Point in the south. North Bull Island is situated in the northwest part of the bay, where one of two major inshore sandbanks lie, and features a 5 km long sandy beach, Dollymount Strand, fronting an internationally recognised wildfowl reserve. Many of the rivers of Dublin reach the Irish Sea at Dublin Bay: the River Liffey, with the River Dodder flow received less than 1 km inland, River Tolka, and various smaller rivers and streams.

Dublin Bay FAQs

There are approximately ten beaches and bathing spots around Dublin Bay: Dollymount Strand; Forty Foot Bathing Place; Half Moon bathing spot; Merrion Strand; Bull Wall; Sandycove Beach; Sandymount Strand; Seapoint; Shelley Banks; Sutton, Burrow Beach

There are slipways on the north side of Dublin Bay at Clontarf, Sutton and on the southside at Dun Laoghaire Harbour, and in Dalkey at Coliemore and Bulloch Harbours.

Dublin Bay is administered by a number of Government Departments, three local authorities and several statutory agencies. Dublin Port Company is in charge of navigation on the Bay.

Dublin Bay is approximately 70 sq kilometres or 7,000 hectares. The Bay is about 10 kilometres wide along its north-south base, and seven km in length east-west to its peak at the centre of the city of Dublin; stretching from Howth Head in the north to Dalkey Point in the south.

Dun Laoghaire Harbour on the southside of the Bay has an East and West Pier, each one kilometre long; this is one of the largest human-made harbours in the world. There also piers or walls at the entrance to the River Liffey at Dublin city known as the Great North and South Walls. Other harbours on the Bay include Bulloch Harbour and Coliemore Harbours both at Dalkey.

There are two marinas on Dublin Bay. Ireland's largest marina with over 800 berths is on the southern shore at Dun Laoghaire Harbour. The other is at Poolbeg Yacht and Boat Club on the River Liffey close to Dublin City.

Car and passenger Ferries operate from Dublin Port to the UK, Isle of Man and France. A passenger ferry operates from Dun Laoghaire Harbour to Howth as well as providing tourist voyages around the bay.

Dublin Bay has two Islands. Bull Island at Clontarf and Dalkey Island on the southern shore of the Bay.

The River Liffey flows through Dublin city and into the Bay. Its tributaries include the River Dodder, the River Poddle and the River Camac.

Dollymount, Burrow and Seapoint beaches

Approximately 1,500 boats from small dinghies to motorboats to ocean-going yachts. The vast majority, over 1,000, are moored at Dun Laoghaire Harbour which is Ireland's boating capital.

In 1981, UNESCO recognised the importance of Dublin Bay by designating North Bull Island as a Biosphere because of its rare and internationally important habitats and species of wildlife. To support sustainable development, UNESCO’s concept of a Biosphere has evolved to include not just areas of ecological value but also the areas around them and the communities that live and work within these areas. There have since been additional international and national designations, covering much of Dublin Bay, to ensure the protection of its water quality and biodiversity. To fulfil these broader management aims for the ecosystem, the Biosphere was expanded in 2015. The Biosphere now covers Dublin Bay, reflecting its significant environmental, economic, cultural and tourism importance, and extends to over 300km² to include the bay, the shore and nearby residential areas.

On the Southside at Dun Laoghaire, there is the National Yacht Club, Royal St. George Yacht Club, Royal Irish Yacht Club and Dun Laoghaire Motor Yacht Club as well as Dublin Bay Sailing Club. In the city centre, there is Poolbeg Yacht and Boat Club. On the Northside of Dublin, there is Clontarf Yacht and Boat Club and Sutton Dinghy Club. While not on Dublin Bay, Howth Yacht Club is the major north Dublin Sailing centre.

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