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Dublin Bay Boating News and Information

Displaying items by tag: Wexford

A security firm based in Wexford town has offered electronic protection and 24-hour monitoring to Wexford County Council in a bid to secure funding for lifebuoys on Wexford Bridge.
According to the Wexford People, the move comes after a spate of accidents involving people falling from the bridge, which is one of the longest in Ireland. The original lifebuoys were removed several years ago due to vandalism.
SAR Ireland has more on the story HERE.

A security firm based in Wexford town has offered electronic protection and 24-hour monitoring to Wexford County Council in a bid to secure funding for lifebuoys on Wexford Bridge.

According to the Wexford People, the move comes after a spate of accidents involving people falling from the bridge, which is one of the longest in Ireland. The original lifebuoys were removed several years ago due to vandalism.

SAR Ireland has more on the story HERE.

Published in Water Safety
Volunteer lifeboat crew with Wexford RNLI had to deal with two dramatic callouts on the river Slaney within the space of two hours yesterday (Sunday 8th May).  Twenty rowers taking part in a triathlon were brought to safety as waves swamped their boat and a man was rescued after he was seen falling from Wexford bridge.
Four of the eight rowing boats involved in a triathlon got into difficulty as strong wind over tide caused dangerous waves which swamped the boats and capsized one.  The boats were spotted by members of the Wexford Harbour Boat Club who had safety boats in the water as part of their weekly sailing practice. The Wexford RNLI Lifeboat was training at the time and came to the assistance of the rowers, some of whom were in the freezing water for ten minutes. Conditions were challenging with a southerly force 6 and wind over tide which resulted in seas of 3 foot waves, making it very difficult for the rowers. All rowers were brought ashore.
One hour after the callout, a man was spotted falling from Wexford bridge, at 1:09pm. The quick action of the public and the gardai ensured that the lifeboat, some of whose crew were still at the station was able to launch within minutes of the man entering the water.  With the help of the gardai on the bridge who kept a visual on the man the lifeboat crew were able to locate him. The man was unconscious when lifeboat volunteer Frank O'Brien, jumped into the water and pulled him into the lifeboat.  First aid was immediately adminstered and the casualty was brought back to the lifeboat station and met by a  waiting ambulance.
Published in RNLI Lifeboats
Tagged under

Brothers Rory (37) and Eoin (36) O'Connor spent last night (Thursday 2 December 2010) in an igloo on Duncannon beach in county Wexford to raise funds for RNLI lifeboats. The pair went into the home-made igloo at 8pm last night and emerged this morning at 8am.

The igloo was built on Duncannon beach by local men Patrick Byrne and David Walsh following plummeting temperature and heavy snowfall in the southeast.  On hearing of the structure, Rory and Eoin approached the men to ask if they could spend a night in the igloo to raise funds for RNLI lifeboats.  With their agreement they made plans to spend the evening in the ice and brought with them special clothing and sleeping bags to brave the arctic temperatures.

Rory is a volunteer lifeboat helm on Fethard-on-Sea D class inshore lifeboat in county Wexford and when the temperatures dropped on the south-east coast he and his brother Eoin decided to do something to raise funds for the RNLI and to remind people that lifeboat crew go out in all types of weather.

Speaking from the igloo at the end of their night Fethard lifeboat helm Rory said "We are honestly delighted with the response from the public to our sleepover.  People were dropping by the igloo all night to say hello and drop some money in the bucket.  We even had a local pub send down some hot whiskeys to keep us warm.  It was actually quite comfortable and we even managed to get a good night's sleep."

The brothers emerged this morning in good spirits and were looking forward to a cooked Irish breakfast on the beach.

Rory and Eoin have set up a donations page HERE. The brothers have so far raised over €1,500 for the lifeboats.

igloo

A night in the cold has produced 1500 Euros so far!

 


Marine Warnings

Published in RNLI Lifeboats
The RNLB Killarney arrived yesterday into Kilmore Quay after making her delivery voyage from England. The new €3 million craft is the first Tamar-class to operate in Irish waters and is the most technically advanced lifeboat in the RNLI fleet.

The lifeboat was funded by a legacy from Mrs Mary Weeks from Surrey in England who passed away in 2006. Mrs Weeks met her husband while on a cruise off the west coast of Scotland on a boat named Killarney.

Tamar_arrival

The RNLB Killarney on her maiden arrival yesterday to Kilmore Quay, Co. Wexford.

She also has a strong RNLI connection through her maiden name Distin. Mrs Weeks was related to the Coxswain of Salcombe lifeboat Samuel Distin and to Albert Distin. Both men lost their lives in the Salcombe lifeboat disaster of 1916.

The lifeboat hull was moulded by the RNLI and fitted out in Plymouth under RNLI supervision. Lifeboat crewmembers based in Kilmore Quay have undertaken comprehensive training at the lifeboat college in Poole and onboard the Tamar class lifeboat in preparation for their new arrival.

The new lifeboat is not expected to go on service until later in the month and the next few weeks will be spent training the rest of the lifeboat crew on the new boat. RNLI Deputy Divisional Inspector Gareth Morrison said, " This is a huge day for the RNLI in Ireland. The arrival of any lifeboat is a great celebration for a community but when it is the first of a new class of lifeboat the excitement is even greater.

The Kilmore Quay lifeboat crew have been looking forward to this day for a long time. Their last lifeboat the Famous Grouse rescued over 300 people since 2004 and this lifeboat station has had many challenging rescues in its history. I wish them the very best of luck with their new lifeboat, may she have many successful years ahead of her." Kilmore Quay lifeboat Coxswain Eugene Kehoe added, "It's a proud day for Kilmore Quay.

Passage_crew

The crew of the RNLB Killarney

A new lifeboat is a tremendous gift and we will take very good care of it. We are very grateful to the donor who by leaving this legacy to the RNLI has provided a lifeboat that will go on to save many lives at sea.

On a bad night miles out to sea it is good to know that we have a state of the art lifeboat and a highly trained lifeboat crew to respond to every situation." The new Tamar class lifeboat is 16.3 metres in length with a maximum speed of 25 knots compared to the 14.3 metres of the current Tyne class lifeboat stationed at Kilmore Quay, which has a maximum speed of 18 knots.

The lifeboat is self-righting and is fitted with an integrated electronics Systems and Information Management System, which allows the lifeboat crew to monitor, operate and control many of the boats systems from shock mitigating seats. The Tamar also carries a Y boat (an inflatable daughter boat) which is housed under the aft deck and deployed from a hinged door in the transom. The lifeboat has room for 44 survivors. It will replace the current Kilmore Quay Tyne class lifeboat The Famous Grouse, which will be retired to the RNLI relief lifeboat fleet.

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Marine Warnings

Published in RNLI Lifeboats

The RNLI's new Tamar class all weather lifeboat will arrive at Kilmore Quay in County Wexford next Wednesday (13 October 2010) at 5pm. This €3 million lifeboat will be the first of its class to be based at an Irish lifeboat station. It is the most modern and technically advanced lifeboat in the RNLI fleet.

The new lifeboat, which is to be named Killarney, will undertake a five day passage from Poole in England, calling at lifeboat stations at the Channel Islands, Fowey, Padstow and Fishguard before arriving it its new home at the RNLI Kilmore Quay lifeboat station next Wednesday.

The lifeboat hull was moulded by the RNLI and fitted out in Plymouth under RNLI supervision. Lifeboat crewmembers based in Kilmore Quay have undertaken comprehensive training at the lifeboat college in Poole and on passage onboard the Tamar class lifeboat in preparation for their new arrival.

The new Tamar class lifeboat is 16.3 metres in length with a maximum speed of 25 knots compared to the 14.3 metres of the current Tyne class lifeboat stationed at Kilmore Quay, which has a maximum speed of 18 knots. The lifeboat is self-righting and is fitted with an integrated electronics Systems and Information Management System, which allows the lifeboat crew to monitor, operate and control many of the boats systems from shock mitigating seats.

The Tamar also carries a Y boat (an inflatable daughter boat) which is housed under the aft deck and deployed from a hinged door in the transom. The lifeboat has room for 44 survivors. It will replace the current Kilmore Quay Tyne class lifeboat The Famous Grouse, which will be retired to the RNLI relief lifeboat fleet. The €3 million lifeboat has been funded from a legacy.

All are welcome to attend. The RNLI is inviting everyone interested to see the new lifeboat's arrival into Kilmore Quay Harbour to be in place before 5pm.

Tamar Arrival in Ireland

Event: First Tamar class lifeboat in Ireland to arrive at Kilmore Quay RNLI Lifeboat Station in County Wexford

Date: Wednesday 13 October 2010

Time: 5pm at Kilmore Quay harbour in County Wexford

Related Safety posts

RNLI Lifeboats in Ireland


Safety News


Rescue News from RNLI Lifeboats in Ireland


Coast Guard News from Ireland


Water Safety News from Ireland

Marine Casualty Investigation Board News

Marine Warnings

Published in RNLI Lifeboats
The Irish Marine Federation (IMF) has thrown its weight behind MEP Nessa Childers' efforts to raise funds in Europe for a stalled marina in Courtown.

Wexford Councillors and County Council officials have come together to seek European assistance to help save the stalled Courtown marina, news of the move was published in the Gorey ECHO.

"This is precisely the kind of question our politicians we need to ask if we're ever to complete the necklace of marinas around our coastline, said the IMF's David O'Brien.

Plans for a 230-berth marina in Courtown were unveiled in November 2008 and included apartments and retail units. The plans also included the construction of a breakwater off the south pier in the village.

Childers visited the north Wexford seaside village to discuss the possibility of restarting the project which has been stalled since 2008 due to the economic recession.

Following her meeting with council officials and county councillors, Ms. Childers submitted a Parliamentary Question regarding the possibilities for getting financial assistance for marina facilities in Ireland.

In the question Childers says: "Is there funding opportunities or other supports available from the European Union in order to assist in providing finance for the development of marina facilities in Ireland to enhance our tourism product?"

Ireland, as an island nation, is working to develop its infrastructure as a destination for sailing holidays.

"The development of marinas in a sustainable fashion at key locations around the coast of Ireland to accommodate sailing and boating activities would benefit from investment from a tourism and economic development point of view." said Childers.

For every euro spent berthing in Courtown marina visiting sailors will spend 10 in the village, according to our research, says O'Brien. Huge Tourism benefits can literally come in on the tide, if only we had the infrastructure", he added.

The IMF is the national body that represents the marine leisure industry including the Irish Marina Operators Association (IMOA).

The County Council carried out a feasibility study which found that the marina had to be self-funding through sale of apartments and other units as there was no government funding for such developments.

Speaking this week, Director of Services with Wexford County Council, Niall McGuigan said: "It is currently not financially feasible but we hope for the best. We would be very eager for it to go ahead."

Mr. McGuigan said that the project was on hold until either funding became available, an investor was found or a combination of both.

Published in Coastal Notes
17th July 2009

Courtown Sailing Club

cul8r_rounding_mark_l.jpg Courtown Sailing Club is a family orientated and vibrant club where new members are always welcome.

Left: 'Cul8r' rounding mark at the Kilmichael Challenge 2009

 

Post: Courtown Sailing Club, c/o Aine Stafford, South Pier, Courtown Harbour, Co. Wexford. Tel: 086 80 66 594. Please only call at reasonable hours!

Junior Organiser: John Timmons
 

Email: [email protected]

Phone: 087 761 4955 between 19:00 and 21:00 weekday evenings and between 12:00 and 18:00 on weekends

(Above information and image courtesy of Courtown Sailing Club)

Courtown Sailing Club, Courtown Harbour, Gorey, Co. Wexford. Website here.

Have we got your club details? Click here to get involved

Published in Clubs
15th July 2009

Wexford Harbour Boat Club

Facilities include water-skiing, power boating, board sailing and sailing.

Wexford Harbour Boat Club, Redmond Road, Wexford. Tel: +353 53 9122039

Have we got your club details? Click here to get involved

 

Published in Clubs
Page 8 of 8

Dublin Bay

Dublin Bay on the east coast of Ireland stretches over seven kilometres, from Howth Head on its northern tip to Dalkey Island in the south. It's a place most Dubliners simply take for granted, and one of the capital's least visited places. But there's more going on out there than you'd imagine.

The biggest boating centre is at Dun Laoghaire Harbour on the Bay's south shore that is home to over 1,500 pleasure craft, four waterfront yacht clubs and Ireland's largest marina.

The bay is rather shallow with many sandbanks and rocky outcrops, and was notorious in the past for shipwrecks, especially when the wind was from the east. Until modern times, many ships and their passengers were lost along the treacherous coastline from Howth to Dun Laoghaire, less than a kilometre from shore.

The Bay is a C-shaped inlet of the Irish Sea and is about 10 kilometres wide along its north-south base, and 7 km in length to its apex at the centre of the city of Dublin; stretching from Howth Head in the north to Dalkey Point in the south. North Bull Island is situated in the northwest part of the bay, where one of two major inshore sandbanks lie, and features a 5 km long sandy beach, Dollymount Strand, fronting an internationally recognised wildfowl reserve. Many of the rivers of Dublin reach the Irish Sea at Dublin Bay: the River Liffey, with the River Dodder flow received less than 1 km inland, River Tolka, and various smaller rivers and streams.

Dublin Bay FAQs

There are approximately ten beaches and bathing spots around Dublin Bay: Dollymount Strand; Forty Foot Bathing Place; Half Moon bathing spot; Merrion Strand; Bull Wall; Sandycove Beach; Sandymount Strand; Seapoint; Shelley Banks; Sutton, Burrow Beach

There are slipways on the north side of Dublin Bay at Clontarf, Sutton and on the southside at Dun Laoghaire Harbour, and in Dalkey at Coliemore and Bulloch Harbours.

Dublin Bay is administered by a number of Government Departments, three local authorities and several statutory agencies. Dublin Port Company is in charge of navigation on the Bay.

Dublin Bay is approximately 70 sq kilometres or 7,000 hectares. The Bay is about 10 kilometres wide along its north-south base, and seven km in length east-west to its peak at the centre of the city of Dublin; stretching from Howth Head in the north to Dalkey Point in the south.

Dun Laoghaire Harbour on the southside of the Bay has an East and West Pier, each one kilometre long; this is one of the largest human-made harbours in the world. There also piers or walls at the entrance to the River Liffey at Dublin city known as the Great North and South Walls. Other harbours on the Bay include Bulloch Harbour and Coliemore Harbours both at Dalkey.

There are two marinas on Dublin Bay. Ireland's largest marina with over 800 berths is on the southern shore at Dun Laoghaire Harbour. The other is at Poolbeg Yacht and Boat Club on the River Liffey close to Dublin City.

Car and passenger Ferries operate from Dublin Port to the UK, Isle of Man and France. A passenger ferry operates from Dun Laoghaire Harbour to Howth as well as providing tourist voyages around the bay.

Dublin Bay has two Islands. Bull Island at Clontarf and Dalkey Island on the southern shore of the Bay.

The River Liffey flows through Dublin city and into the Bay. Its tributaries include the River Dodder, the River Poddle and the River Camac.

Dollymount, Burrow and Seapoint beaches

Approximately 1,500 boats from small dinghies to motorboats to ocean-going yachts. The vast majority, over 1,000, are moored at Dun Laoghaire Harbour which is Ireland's boating capital.

In 1981, UNESCO recognised the importance of Dublin Bay by designating North Bull Island as a Biosphere because of its rare and internationally important habitats and species of wildlife. To support sustainable development, UNESCO’s concept of a Biosphere has evolved to include not just areas of ecological value but also the areas around them and the communities that live and work within these areas. There have since been additional international and national designations, covering much of Dublin Bay, to ensure the protection of its water quality and biodiversity. To fulfil these broader management aims for the ecosystem, the Biosphere was expanded in 2015. The Biosphere now covers Dublin Bay, reflecting its significant environmental, economic, cultural and tourism importance, and extends to over 300km² to include the bay, the shore and nearby residential areas.

On the Southside at Dun Laoghaire, there is the National Yacht Club, Royal St. George Yacht Club, Royal Irish Yacht Club and Dun Laoghaire Motor Yacht Club as well as Dublin Bay Sailing Club. In the city centre, there is Poolbeg Yacht and Boat Club. On the Northside of Dublin, there is Clontarf Yacht and Boat Club and Sutton Dinghy Club. While not on Dublin Bay, Howth Yacht Club is the major north Dublin Sailing centre.

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