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Dublin Bay Boating News and Information

Displaying items by tag: World Rowing Championships

#Rowing: Monika Dukarska and Aileen Crowley kept the good buzz around Ireland performances going in Linz-Ottensheim, winning a battle with Italy to take second in the pairs quarter-final at the World Championships. The Australian pair of Jessica Morrison and Annabelle McIntyre opened an early lead and won by a big margin. Italy and Ireland moved into clear second and third spots, but it took a fight-out coming up to the line to decide it. All three crews qualified for the semi-finals, but Ireland looked steady and strong and finished out well to secure a better lane draw.

World Rowing Championships, Linz-Ottensheim, Austria, Day Four (Irish interest)

Women

Pair - Quarter-Final Two (First Three to A/B Semi-Finals; rest to C/D Semi-Finals): 1 Australia 7:08.74, 2 Ireland (A Crowley, M Dukarska) 7:12.51, 3 Italy 7:13.11.

Pararowing: Women's PR Two Single Sculls, Preliminary Race: 1 Australia (K Ross) 9:24.99; 3 Ireland (K O'Brien) 9:52.13.

Published in Rowing

#Rowing: Ireland brought its tally of boats qualified for the next round to eight this morning at the World Rowing Championships in Linz, Austria.

The women's four of Tara Hanlon, Eimear Lambe, Aifric Keogh and Emily Hegarty slotted into the semi-finals by taking second behind China in their repechage.

Lydia Heaphy qualified for the semi-final with a third placing the repechage of the lightweight single sculls.

The men's lightweight quadruple fell just short of qualifying for the A Final. The crew of Hugh Sutton, Miles Taylor, Ryan Ballantine and Jake McCarthy finished fifth, with four going through. The Netherlands won from Denmark, Austria and Ireland, with the United States sixth.

World Rowing Championships, Linz, Austria, Day Three (Irish interest)

Men

Lightweight Qudaruple Sculls – Repechage (First Four to A Final; rest to B Final): 5 Ireland (H Sutton, M Taylor, R Ballantine, J McCarthy) 5:58.99.

Women

Four – Repechage One (First Three to A/B Semi-Final; rest to C Final): 2 Ireland (T Hanlon, E Lambe, A Keogh, E Hegarty) 6:35.14

Lightweight Single – Repechage Two (First Three to A/B Semi-Final; rest to C Final): 3 Ireland (L Heaphy) 7:48.40.

Published in Rowing

#Rowing: Gary O’Donovan won his repechage to take his place in the quarter finals of the lightweight single sculls at the World Rowing Championships in Linz in Austria.

 The Skibbereen man made the race his own from early on, leaving his rivals behind and winning from Uncas Batista of Brazil, who took the second qualifying spot in the quarter finals.  

World Rowing Championships, Linz, Austria, Day Two (Irish interest)

Men

Pair - Repechage Two (First Two to Quarter-Finals; Third to Final E): 1 Chile 6:43.70, 2 Greece 6:43.71; 3 Ireland (M O’Donovan, S O’Driscoll) 6:44.35.

Lightweight Quadruple – Heat One (Winner to A Final; rest to Repechage): 4 Ireland (H Sutton, M Taylor, R Ballantine, J McCarthy) 6:04.84

Lightweight Single Sculls – Repechage Two (First Two to Quarter-Finals; rest to E/F Semi-Finals): 1 Ireland (G O’Donovan) 7:28.07, 2 Brazil (U Batista) 7:32.97.  

Published in Rowing

#Rowing: The Ireland pair of Mark O’Donovan and Shane O’Driscoll just missed out on a qualifying for the quarter-finals at the World Rowing Championships in Austria today.

 The Skibbereen men had to be in the top two in their repechage, but in a three-boat finish, Chile pipped Greece and Ireland were just .66 of a second off qualifying. They go to the E Final.

  The lightweight quadruple of Hugh Sutton, Miles Taylor, Ryan Ballantine and Jake McCarthy finished fourth in their heat and will compete in a repechage as they attempt to make the A Final. Italy were very strong and won well, staying clear of Denmark and Austria. Italy qualified for the A Final.

World Rowing Championships, Linz, Austria, Day Two (Irish interest)

Men

Pair - Repechage Two (First Two to Quarter-Finals; Third to Final E): 1 Chile 6:43.70, 2 Greece 6:43.71; 3 Ireland (M O’Donovan, S O’Driscoll) 6:44.35.

Lightweight Quadruple – Heat One (Winner to A Final; rest to Repechage): 4 Ireland (H Sutton, M Taylor, R Ballantine, J McCarthy) 6:04.84

Published in Rowing

#Rowing: Sanita Puspure won her heat of the single sculls at the World Rowing Championships in Linz with plenty to spare – and still set the second fastest time of the day. Laila Youssifou of the Netherlands took the second qualification spot for the quarter-finals, but she provided little challenge to the reigning champion, who was well clear. Puspure’s time of 7:44.41 was close to the 7:43.81 set by Emma Twigg of New Zealand in the fastest of eight heats.  

World Rowing Championships, Linz, Austria, Day One (Irish interest)

Men

Pair – Heat One (First Four to Quarter-Finals; rest to Repechage): 6 Ireland (M O’Donovan, S O’Driscoll) 6:50.51.

Double Sculls – Heat One (First Three to Quarter-Finals; rest to Repechage): 1 Ireland (P Doyle, R Byrne) 6:28.93.

Lightweight Double Sculls – Heat Three (First Three to Quarter-Finals; rest to Repechage): 1 Ireland (F McCarthy, P O’Donovan) 6:28.02

Lightweight Single Sculls – Heat Four (First Three to Quarter-Finals; rest to Repechage): 4 Ireland (G O’Donovan) 8:06.49.  

Women

Four – Heat One (First Two to A/B Semi-Finals; rest to Repechage): 3 Ireland (T Hanlon, E Lambe, A Keogh, E Hegarty) 6:44.72.

Pair – Heat Four (First Four to Quarter-Finals; rest to Repechage): 2 Ireland (A Crowley, M Dukarska) 7:13.30

Lightweight Double Sculls – Heat Four (First Four to Quarter-Finals; rest to Repechage): 4 Ireland (A Casey, D Walsh) 7:25.62.

Single Sculls – Heat Eight (First Four to Quarter-Finals; rest to Repechage): 1 Ireland (S Puspure) 7:44.41.

Lightweight Single Sculls – Heat Three (First Two to A/B Semi-Finals; rest to Repechage): 3 Ireland (L Heaphy) 8:01.79.

Published in Rowing

#Rowing: Philip Doyle and Ronan Byrne are in top form and showed it by winning their heat of the double sculls at the World Rowing Championships in Linz today. They started well, swapped the lead with Australia in the middle stages, then took it over again in the final quarter. Belarus managed to take the third qualification place for the quarter-finals despite catching a crab coming up to the line. Their bow crossed just ahead of the United States.

World Rowing Championships, Linz, Austria, Day One (Irish interest)

Men

Pair – Heat One (First Four to Quarter-Finals; rest to Repechage): 6 Ireland (M O’Donovan, S O’Driscoll) 6:50.51.

Double Sculls – Heat One (First Three to Quarter-Finals; rest to Repechage): 1 Ireland (P Doyle, R Byrne) 6:28.93.

Lightweight Double Sculls – Heat Three (First Three to Quarter-Finals; rest to Repechage): 1 Ireland (F McCarthy, P O’Donovan) 6:28.02

Lightweight Single Sculls – Heat Four (First Three to Quarter-Finals; rest to Repechage): 4 Ireland (G O’Donovan) 8:06.49.  

Women

Four – Heat One (First Two to A/B Semi-Finals; rest to Repechage): 3 Ireland (T Hanlon, E Lambe, A Keogh, E Hegarty) 6:44.72.

Pair – Heat Four (First Four to Quarter-Finals; rest to Repechage): 2 Ireland (A Crowley, M Dukarska) 7:13.30

Lightweight Double Sculls – Heat Four (First Four to Quarter-Finals; rest to Repechage): 4 Ireland (A Casey, D Walsh) 7:25.62.

Lightweight Single Sculls – Heat Three (First Two to A/B Semi-Finals; rest to Repechage): 3 Ireland (L Heaphy) 8:01.79.

Published in Rowing

#Rowing: The two Ireland lightweight single scullers missed out on qualification from their heats at the World Rowing Championships – but in different fashions. Lydia Heaphy held the second and final qualification spot for the semi-final through much of her race only to be caught coming up to the line by Martine Veldhuis of the Netherlands. Heaphy missed out by just .3 of a second in a race won by Marie-Louise Draeger of Germany.   

 Gary O’Donovan was in fifth place in his heat of the lightweight single at 1,000 metres and seemed in striking distance of a top-three place which would have sent him to the quarter-finals. However, he stopped and then paddled home fourth. He will have to come through a repechage to secure a place in the quarter-finals.

World Rowing Championships, Linz, Austria, Day One (Irish interest)

Men

Pair – Heat One (First Four to Quarter-Finals; rest to Repechage): 6 Ireland (M O’Donovan, S O’Driscoll) 6:50.51.

Lightweight Double Sculls – Heat Three (First Three to Quarter-Finals; rest to Repechage): 1 Ireland (F McCarthy, P O’Donovan) 6:28.02

Lightweight Single Sculls – Heat Four (First Three to Quarter-Finals; rest to Repechage): 4 Ireland (G O’Donovan) 8:06.49.  

Women

Four – Heat One (First Two to A/B Semi-Finals; rest to Repechage): 3 Ireland (T Hanlon, E Lambe, A Keogh, E Hegarty) 6:44.72.

Pair – Heat Four (First Four to Quarter-Finals; rest to Repechage): 2 Ireland (A Crowley, M Dukarska) 7:13.30

Lightweight Double Sculls – Heat Four (First Four to Quarter-Finals; rest to Repechage): 4 Ireland (A Casey, D Walsh) 7:25.62.

Lightweight Single Sculls – Heat Three (First Two to A/B Semi-Finals; rest to Repechage): 3 Ireland (L Heaphy) 8:01.79.

Published in Rowing

#Rowing: The Ireland women’s four gave a good account of themselves on their first competitive outing together, just missing out on direct qualification from their heat of the World Rowing Championships in Linz, Austria.

 Tara Hanlon, Eimear Lambe, Aifric Keogh and Emily Hegarty came up against Australia, who were dominant, and the United States, who overcame a poor start to take the second available semi-final spot. The Ireland crew pushed them right to line, with just 1.89 seconds between them at the finish.  

World Rowing Championships, Linz, Austria, Day One (Irish interest)

Men

Pair – Heat One (First Four to Quarter-Finals; rest to Repechage): 6 Ireland (M O’Donovan, S O’Driscoll) 6:50.51.

Lightweight Double Sculls – Heat Three (First Three to Quarter-Finals; rest to Repechage): 1 Ireland (F McCarthy, P O’Donovan) 6:28.02

Women

Four – Heat One (First Two to A/B Semi-Finals; rest to Repechage): 3 Ireland (T Hanlon, E Lambe, A Keogh, E Hegarty) 6:44.72.

Pair – Heat Four (First Four to Quarter-Finals; rest to Repechage): 2 Ireland (A Crowley, M Dukarska) 7:13.30

Lightweight Double Sculls – Heat Four (First Four to Quarter-Finals; rest to Repechage): 4 Ireland (A Casey, D Walsh) 7:25.62.

Published in Rowing

#Rowing: Aoife Casey and Denise Walsh finished fourth in their heat and qualified for the quarter-finals of the lightweight double sculls at the World Rowing Championships in Linz, Austria. The top three in the race will all have ambitions of taking a medal come next weekend: France won from South Africa and China. Walsh and Casey did enough to stay clear of Thailand and nab the final qualification spot.

World Rowing Championships, Linz, Austria, Day One (Irish interest)

Men

Pair – Heat One (First Four to Quarter-Finals; rest to Repechage): 6 Ireland (M O’Donovan, S O’Driscoll) 6:50.51.

Lightweight Double Sculls – Heat Three (First Three to Quarter-Finals; rest to Repechage): 1 Ireland (F McCarthy, P O’Donovan) 6:28.02

Women

Pair – Heat Four (First Four to Quarter-Finals; rest to Repechage): 2 Ireland (A Crowley, M Dukarska) 7:13.30

Lightweight Double Sculls – Heat Four (First Four to Quarter-Finals; rest to Repechage): 4 Ireland (A Casey, D Walsh) 7:25.62.

Published in Rowing

#Rowing: Ireland’s Fintan McCarthy and Paul O’Donovan won their heat to qualify directly for their quarter-final of the lightweight double sculls at the World Rowing Championships in Austria this morning. The Skibbereen-UCC combination were well in command all through. There was a big surprise in the previous heat. Norway, who took bronze at the Rio Olympics, did not make it directly to the quarter-finals. They were fourth.

World Rowing Championships, Linz, Austria, Day One (Irish interest)

Men

Pair – Heat One (First Four to Quarter-Finals; rest to Repechage): 6 Ireland (M O’Donovan, S O’Driscoll) 6:50.51.

Lightweight Double Sculls – Heat Three (First Three to Quarter-Finals; rest to Repechage): 1 Ireland (F McCarthy, P O’Donovan) 6:28.02

Women

Pair – Heat Four (First Four to Quarter-Finals; rest to Repechage): 2 Ireland (A Crowley, M Dukarska) 7:13.30

Published in Rowing
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Dublin Bay

Dublin Bay on the east coast of Ireland stretches over seven kilometres, from Howth Head on its northern tip to Dalkey Island in the south. It's a place most Dubliners simply take for granted, and one of the capital's least visited places. But there's more going on out there than you'd imagine.

The biggest boating centre is at Dun Laoghaire Harbour on the Bay's south shore that is home to over 1,500 pleasure craft, four waterfront yacht clubs and Ireland's largest marina.

The bay is rather shallow with many sandbanks and rocky outcrops, and was notorious in the past for shipwrecks, especially when the wind was from the east. Until modern times, many ships and their passengers were lost along the treacherous coastline from Howth to Dun Laoghaire, less than a kilometre from shore.

The Bay is a C-shaped inlet of the Irish Sea and is about 10 kilometres wide along its north-south base, and 7 km in length to its apex at the centre of the city of Dublin; stretching from Howth Head in the north to Dalkey Point in the south. North Bull Island is situated in the northwest part of the bay, where one of two major inshore sandbanks lie, and features a 5 km long sandy beach, Dollymount Strand, fronting an internationally recognised wildfowl reserve. Many of the rivers of Dublin reach the Irish Sea at Dublin Bay: the River Liffey, with the River Dodder flow received less than 1 km inland, River Tolka, and various smaller rivers and streams.

Dublin Bay FAQs

There are approximately ten beaches and bathing spots around Dublin Bay: Dollymount Strand; Forty Foot Bathing Place; Half Moon bathing spot; Merrion Strand; Bull Wall; Sandycove Beach; Sandymount Strand; Seapoint; Shelley Banks; Sutton, Burrow Beach

There are slipways on the north side of Dublin Bay at Clontarf, Sutton and on the southside at Dun Laoghaire Harbour, and in Dalkey at Coliemore and Bulloch Harbours.

Dublin Bay is administered by a number of Government Departments, three local authorities and several statutory agencies. Dublin Port Company is in charge of navigation on the Bay.

Dublin Bay is approximately 70 sq kilometres or 7,000 hectares. The Bay is about 10 kilometres wide along its north-south base, and seven km in length east-west to its peak at the centre of the city of Dublin; stretching from Howth Head in the north to Dalkey Point in the south.

Dun Laoghaire Harbour on the southside of the Bay has an East and West Pier, each one kilometre long; this is one of the largest human-made harbours in the world. There also piers or walls at the entrance to the River Liffey at Dublin city known as the Great North and South Walls. Other harbours on the Bay include Bulloch Harbour and Coliemore Harbours both at Dalkey.

There are two marinas on Dublin Bay. Ireland's largest marina with over 800 berths is on the southern shore at Dun Laoghaire Harbour. The other is at Poolbeg Yacht and Boat Club on the River Liffey close to Dublin City.

Car and passenger Ferries operate from Dublin Port to the UK, Isle of Man and France. A passenger ferry operates from Dun Laoghaire Harbour to Howth as well as providing tourist voyages around the bay.

Dublin Bay has two Islands. Bull Island at Clontarf and Dalkey Island on the southern shore of the Bay.

The River Liffey flows through Dublin city and into the Bay. Its tributaries include the River Dodder, the River Poddle and the River Camac.

Dollymount, Burrow and Seapoint beaches

Approximately 1,500 boats from small dinghies to motorboats to ocean-going yachts. The vast majority, over 1,000, are moored at Dun Laoghaire Harbour which is Ireland's boating capital.

In 1981, UNESCO recognised the importance of Dublin Bay by designating North Bull Island as a Biosphere because of its rare and internationally important habitats and species of wildlife. To support sustainable development, UNESCO’s concept of a Biosphere has evolved to include not just areas of ecological value but also the areas around them and the communities that live and work within these areas. There have since been additional international and national designations, covering much of Dublin Bay, to ensure the protection of its water quality and biodiversity. To fulfil these broader management aims for the ecosystem, the Biosphere was expanded in 2015. The Biosphere now covers Dublin Bay, reflecting its significant environmental, economic, cultural and tourism importance, and extends to over 300km² to include the bay, the shore and nearby residential areas.

On the Southside at Dun Laoghaire, there is the National Yacht Club, Royal St. George Yacht Club, Royal Irish Yacht Club and Dun Laoghaire Motor Yacht Club as well as Dublin Bay Sailing Club. In the city centre, there is Poolbeg Yacht and Boat Club. On the Northside of Dublin, there is Clontarf Yacht and Boat Club and Sutton Dinghy Club. While not on Dublin Bay, Howth Yacht Club is the major north Dublin Sailing centre.

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