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Dublin Bay Boating News and Information

Displaying items by tag: campaign

In an aim to introduce electric vehicle charging points, a campaign has been set up to apply this on board ferries of the Isle of Man Steam Packet.

David Dorricott from the Mountain View Innovation Centre based outside the (harbour town of Ramsey) wants people to be able to 'charge whilst you cross'.

He says the Island is behind other nearby companies, which have brought in ferry EV charging. 

For more Manx Radio reports having contacted the Steam Packet Company for a response with a podcast available through this link.

Published in Ferry

EchoLive reports of an artist who has campaigned against a skyscraper development at the historic Port of Cork site has described new images of the proposed 34-storey tower as “dreadfully ugly”.

Cobh-based painter John Adams has garnered over 1,700 signatures for a petition against large-scale commercial development on the site of the Port of Cork buildings at Custom House Quay.

Tower Holdings unveiled plans yesterday for a €140m development on the site which will include a skyscraper hotel, retail units, cultural spaces, food and beverage businesses, office space, recreational areas and a micro-distillery, creating up to 800 jobs.

The building will be the tallest in Ireland, twice the height of the nearby Elysian Tower.

A planning application for the development is not expected to be lodged until later this month.

More can be read on this story here.

Published in Waterfront Property

The Irish Ocean Literacy Network (IOLN) has issued its final call for a workshop in Dublin next Tuesday 6 May on how to design and develop an environmental awareness campaign.

The IOLN Design Workshop under the theme ‘We are islanders … My island, my ocean’ is being run with support from the SFI MaREI Centre, DCU Water Institute and AquaTT.

Members and interested parties are invited to join a ‘day of inspiration’ at the brainstorming and co-creation workshop for designing and developing a national campaign, working with a host of artists, storytellers and marketeers.

The morning session will be dedicated to sharing ideas, defining campaign strategy and drafting storyboards for campaign content.

The afternoon session will bring together graphic designers, professional science communicators and educators to work together to co-design and create campaign assets for different channels and mediums.

Further design and development will follow after the event in the run-up to launching the campaign next month, with a view to linking it with World Ocean Day on 8 June or SeaFest 2019 in Cork on 7-9 June.

The workshop is free for members of the IOLN, which extends a special welcome to science communicator and those with expertise and an interest in storytelling, animation, graphic design, visual scribing/graphic facilitation, videography, digital marketing and social media campaigns.

For more details and how to book your place, visit the Eventbrite page HERE.

Published in Marine Science

#LobsterPots - Are lobster pots a danger to yachts? That’s the question posed by Yachting Monthly as the UK’s Cruising Association relaunches its campaign to make static-gear fishing safer for small vessels.

The CA has already received nearly 4,000 signatures on its online petition to the Department for Environment, Food & Rural Affairs (DEFRA) to seek “views regarding forceable regulation among other options” for improving the way static fishing gear is marked.

Before its original petition was shut down until after this summer’s UK general election, nearly 6,000 people had signalled their support for the initiative which also has the backing of CA patron and yachting legend Sir Robin Knox-Johnston.

The RYA has additionally launched an online reporting form for boaters to identify incidents of entanglement with poorly marked static fishing gear.

“We think it is time for everybody with an interest to work together to find a solution, particularly one that is cheap and practical for our fishermen,” said a CA spokesperson.

Yachting Monthly has more on the story HERE.

Published in Fishing

#NaomhEanna - Campaigners hoping to preserve the heritage ship Naomh Eanna have circulated a letter among Dublin TDs to gather support for their restoration plans.

Earlier this week Afloat.ie reported that the vessel, described as the 'last Irish heritage ship', is set to face the scrapheap after spending the last 28 years in a state of neglect at Grand Canal Dock.

Now the Save Naomh Eanna campaign has called on local TDs to put their weight behind a 16-week reprieve for the derelict ship so that a business plan for its restoration can be put together.

Save Naomh Eanna argues that cutting up the ship in the Grand Canal graving dock poses an environmental risk to the waters at the dock as well as a physical risk to the 200-year-old dry dock itself, listed as a protected structure.

The campaign also claims there are "irregularities" in the manner by which Waterways Ireland intends to dispose of the vessel, of which it recently took possession.

Published in Historic Boats

#ANGLING - Northern Ireland river anglers are taking a novel approach to lobbying Stormont over salmon exploitation by harnessing the power of social networking.

According to the News Letter, the NoSalmonNets campaigners "have swapped their fishing rods for laptop computers", using Facebook to attract support for their campaign to bring an end to the offshore netting of wild salmon stocks.

As previously reported on Afloat.ie, Northern Ireland's Department of Culture, Arts and Leisure (DCAL) has called for a voluntary ban on offshore salmon fishing, following new research that shows a significant drop in their numbers in the North's rivers.

Seamus Donnelly of NoSalmonNets has welcomed DCAL's recent decision to stop issusing licences for commercial salmon nets that may "contravene European law" off Antrim's north coast, made in an effort to protect salmon stocks in the Foyle river system.

Donnelly explained that the campaign was borne from frustration at the apparent inaction by the NI Executive over the protection of salmon.

“One of the keys to our success has to be Facebook," he said. "The internet has an unlimited reach and we took advantage of that.”

The News Letter has more on the story HERE.

Published in Angling

#MARINE WILDLIFE - The UK's Wildlife Trusts have launched a new website in an effort to redress the idea that the Irish Sea is "a dirty, lifeless" place.

As BBC News reports, the trusts' Cheryl Nicholson put down the Irish Sea's poor image, saying "nothing could be further from the truth".

"Our sea is home to so many amazing species and habitats," she added, "but sadly, after centuries of neglect, it is not in a good state. We must act now to protect the Irish Sea from the depths through to the coastal shallows."

The new website is part of a campaign by wildlife trusts throughout northwest England, Wales, Northern Ireland and the Isle of Man to establish 15 Marine Conservation Zones recommended for the area.

The zones, if officially designated, would provide "a haven for wildlife to recover and thrive", said Nicholson.

As previously reported on Afloat.ie, plans to establish such zones in the Irish Sea have been shelved till 2013 at the earliest after pressure from fishermen, boaters and other groups.

BBC News has more on the story HERE.

Published in Marine Wildlife
The Irish Examiner reports that the Doolin coastguard unit is set to get a new coastguard station.
One of the busiest search and rescue units in the State, the Doolin unit of the Irish Coast Guard currently has to drag its boat some 2km by tractor to Doolin pier.
Much to the delight of local campaigners, the Office of Public Works is now inviting tenders for a €1.9 million dedicated coastguard facility at the pier, following the granting of planning permission by Clare County Council as part of a development plan for the area.
However, the unit's officer in charge Mattie Shannon is cautious about a start date for construction, as the Department of Transport will not be able to provide funding for the project until next year at the earliest.
Fianna Fáil TD for Clare Timmy Dooley told the Examiner: "The least the current Government can do is honour the commitment of the previous government and ensure that the appropriate finances are in place for next year."
The Irish Examiner has more on the story HERE.

The Irish Examiner reports that the Doolin coastguard unit is finally set to get a new coastguard station.

One of the busiest search and rescue units in the State, the Doolin unit of the Irish Coast Guard currently has to drag its boat some 2km by tractor to Doolin pier.

Much to the delight of local campaigners, the Office of Public Works is now inviting tenders for a €1.9 million dedicated coastguard facility at the pier, following the granting of planning permission by Clare County Council as part of a development plan for the area.

However, the unit's officer in charge Mattie Shannon is cautious about a start date for construction, as the Department of Transport will not be able to provide funding for the project until next year at the earliest.

Fianna Fáil TD for Clare Timmy Dooley told the Examiner: "The least the current Government can do is honour the commitment of the previous government and ensure that the appropriate finances are in place for next year."

The Irish Examiner has more on the story HERE.

Published in Coastguard
A Donegal businessman is fronting a new campaign that seeks a more positive and direct approach to supporting harbour businesses.
John Shine - who spearheads the 'Fishing for Jobs' campaign - has accused the Department of Agriculture, Fisheries and Food (DAFF) of thwarting the growth of his and others' businesses "at every turn", The Irish Times reports.
Shine and his fellow campaigners want a full policy adaptation of the 2009 McIver report on the development of business plans for harbour centres, which found a "lack of business focus" among harbour and department officials.
The report noted that existing harbour business tenants had "frustrating" relationships with the DAFF especially with regard to leases. Shine said approximately 40% of property in Killybegs harbour, which has benefited from a €50m development, is lying idle due to a "negative" approach by the DAFF.
The Irish Times has more on the story HERE.

A Donegal businessman is fronting a new campaign that seeks a more positive and direct approach to supporting harbour businesses. 

John Shine - who spearheads the 'Fishing for Jobs' campaign - has accused the Department of Agriculture, Fisheries and Food (DAFF) of thwarting the growth of his and others' businesses "at every turn", The Irish Times reports.

Shine and his fellow campaigners want a full policy adaptation of the 2009 McIver report on the development of business plans for harbour centres, which found a "lack of business focus" among harbour and department officials.

The report noted that existing harbour business tenants had "frustrating" relationships with the DAFF especially with regard to leases. Shine said approximately 40% of property in Killybegs harbour, which has benefited from a €50m development, is lying idle due to a "negative" approach by the DAFF.

The Irish Times has more on the story HERE.

Published in Irish Harbours
Grassroots campaigners have called on the Government to ratify a UN convention on public access to decision-making on environmental issues.
According to The Irish Times, activists at the first All-Ireland Community Campaigns Gathering in Dublin recently claimed that coastal communities would have been “spared a decade of distress” if the Aarhus convention had been adopted into Irish law.
Ireland is one of just a handful of European countries yet to ratify the Aarhus convention, first adopted in 1998. Former Environment Minister John Gormley left office before fulfilling his promise to do so.
Mamie Bowen of the Cork Harbour Alliance for a Safe Environment (Chase) cited the approval of a foreshore licence for the Corrib gas pipeline, despite local concerns, as an example of the Government allowing private companies to "impose dangerous projects on communities.”
The common-cause gathering was attended by community activists from Cork, Derry, Donegal, Dublin, Kerry, Limerick, Mayo and Tyrone.
The Irish Times has more on the story HERE.

Grassroots campaigners have called on the Government to ratify a UN convention on public access to decision-making on environmental issues.

According to The Irish Times, activists at the first All-Ireland Community Campaigns Gathering in Dublin recently claimed that coastal communities would have been “spared a decade of distress” if the Aarhus convention had been adopted into Irish law.

Ireland is one of just a handful of European countries yet to ratify the Aarhus convention, first adopted in 1998. Former Environment Minister John Gormley left office before fulfilling his promise to do so.

Mamie Bowen of the Cork Harbour Alliance for a Safe Environment (Chase) cited the approval of a foreshore licence for the Corrib gas pipeline, despite local concerns, as an example of the Government allowing private companies to "impose dangerous projects on communities.”

The common-cause gathering was attended by community activists from Cork, Derry, Donegal, Dublin, Kerry, Limerick, Mayo and Tyrone.

The Irish Times has more on the story HERE.

Published in Coastal Notes
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Dublin Bay

Dublin Bay on the east coast of Ireland stretches over seven kilometres, from Howth Head on its northern tip to Dalkey Island in the south. It's a place most Dubliners simply take for granted, and one of the capital's least visited places. But there's more going on out there than you'd imagine.

The biggest boating centre is at Dun Laoghaire Harbour on the Bay's south shore that is home to over 1,500 pleasure craft, four waterfront yacht clubs and Ireland's largest marina.

The bay is rather shallow with many sandbanks and rocky outcrops, and was notorious in the past for shipwrecks, especially when the wind was from the east. Until modern times, many ships and their passengers were lost along the treacherous coastline from Howth to Dun Laoghaire, less than a kilometre from shore.

The Bay is a C-shaped inlet of the Irish Sea and is about 10 kilometres wide along its north-south base, and 7 km in length to its apex at the centre of the city of Dublin; stretching from Howth Head in the north to Dalkey Point in the south. North Bull Island is situated in the northwest part of the bay, where one of two major inshore sandbanks lie, and features a 5 km long sandy beach, Dollymount Strand, fronting an internationally recognised wildfowl reserve. Many of the rivers of Dublin reach the Irish Sea at Dublin Bay: the River Liffey, with the River Dodder flow received less than 1 km inland, River Tolka, and various smaller rivers and streams.

Dublin Bay FAQs

There are approximately ten beaches and bathing spots around Dublin Bay: Dollymount Strand; Forty Foot Bathing Place; Half Moon bathing spot; Merrion Strand; Bull Wall; Sandycove Beach; Sandymount Strand; Seapoint; Shelley Banks; Sutton, Burrow Beach

There are slipways on the north side of Dublin Bay at Clontarf, Sutton and on the southside at Dun Laoghaire Harbour, and in Dalkey at Coliemore and Bulloch Harbours.

Dublin Bay is administered by a number of Government Departments, three local authorities and several statutory agencies. Dublin Port Company is in charge of navigation on the Bay.

Dublin Bay is approximately 70 sq kilometres or 7,000 hectares. The Bay is about 10 kilometres wide along its north-south base, and seven km in length east-west to its peak at the centre of the city of Dublin; stretching from Howth Head in the north to Dalkey Point in the south.

Dun Laoghaire Harbour on the southside of the Bay has an East and West Pier, each one kilometre long; this is one of the largest human-made harbours in the world. There also piers or walls at the entrance to the River Liffey at Dublin city known as the Great North and South Walls. Other harbours on the Bay include Bulloch Harbour and Coliemore Harbours both at Dalkey.

There are two marinas on Dublin Bay. Ireland's largest marina with over 800 berths is on the southern shore at Dun Laoghaire Harbour. The other is at Poolbeg Yacht and Boat Club on the River Liffey close to Dublin City.

Car and passenger Ferries operate from Dublin Port to the UK, Isle of Man and France. A passenger ferry operates from Dun Laoghaire Harbour to Howth as well as providing tourist voyages around the bay.

Dublin Bay has two Islands. Bull Island at Clontarf and Dalkey Island on the southern shore of the Bay.

The River Liffey flows through Dublin city and into the Bay. Its tributaries include the River Dodder, the River Poddle and the River Camac.

Dollymount, Burrow and Seapoint beaches

Approximately 1,500 boats from small dinghies to motorboats to ocean-going yachts. The vast majority, over 1,000, are moored at Dun Laoghaire Harbour which is Ireland's boating capital.

In 1981, UNESCO recognised the importance of Dublin Bay by designating North Bull Island as a Biosphere because of its rare and internationally important habitats and species of wildlife. To support sustainable development, UNESCO’s concept of a Biosphere has evolved to include not just areas of ecological value but also the areas around them and the communities that live and work within these areas. There have since been additional international and national designations, covering much of Dublin Bay, to ensure the protection of its water quality and biodiversity. To fulfil these broader management aims for the ecosystem, the Biosphere was expanded in 2015. The Biosphere now covers Dublin Bay, reflecting its significant environmental, economic, cultural and tourism importance, and extends to over 300km² to include the bay, the shore and nearby residential areas.

On the Southside at Dun Laoghaire, there is the National Yacht Club, Royal St. George Yacht Club, Royal Irish Yacht Club and Dun Laoghaire Motor Yacht Club as well as Dublin Bay Sailing Club. In the city centre, there is Poolbeg Yacht and Boat Club. On the Northside of Dublin, there is Clontarf Yacht and Boat Club and Sutton Dinghy Club. While not on Dublin Bay, Howth Yacht Club is the major north Dublin Sailing centre.

© Afloat 2020