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Dublin Bay Boating News and Information

Displaying items by tag: canoeing

The Irish Canoe Union will host a sprint head-to-head regatta in Kildare next weekend.
All canoeists in classes K1 200m and 500m are welcome to take part in the event, on the Grand Canal in Prosperous on Saturday 26 March starting at 10.30am.
Heats will be seeded based on previous regatta performances and personal best times. The event finals will then be decided on fastest time from heats.
Entries are open till 8pm on Wednesday 23 March. Entry forms are available via the Canoeing Ireland website.

The Irish Canoe Union will host a sprint head-to-head regatta in Kildare next weekend.

All canoeists in classes K1 200m and 500m are welcome to take part in the event, on the Grand Canal in Prosperous on Saturday 26 March starting at 10.30am.

Heats will be seeded based on previous regatta performances and personal best times. The event finals will then be decided on fastest time from heats.

Entries are open till 8pm on Wednesday 23 March. Entry forms are available via the Canoeing Ireland website.

Published in Canoeing

The annual Odyssey on the Liffey canoe tour is scheduled for this coming Saturday 20 November.

Organised by the Canoeing Ireland Training Centre and the Wild Water Kayak Club, the tour runs from the Garda Boat Club in Islandbridge along the capital's historic quays to  the East Link Bridge in the Docklands.   

The event is open to all paddlers who have a minimum of Level 2 skills standard and who have their own canoe or kayak. Registration details are available on Canoeing Ireland's website at www.canoe.ie.

Published in Canoeing

Canoeing Ireland is currently conducting a survey for new research at UCD aimed to reduce the risk of Weil's disease infection among Irish paddlers.

Those who have at one time contracted a medically confirmed case of Weil's disease (Leptospirosis) are being sought to complete a questionnaire to improve understanding and awareness about the disease in Ireland's waterways.

Weil's disease is a bacterial disease contracted by exposure to water contaminated by animal urine, often from rats. Symptoms are usually flu-like in the early stages, progressing to meningitis, liver damage and renal failure if left untreated.

Canoeing Ireland advises that all information submitted will be handled in the strictest confidence and will only be shared with researchers directly involved with the project.

The questionnaire can be accessed HERE

Published in Canoeing

Irish Water Safety is the statutory body established to promote water safety in Ireland. Their role is to educate people in water safety best practices. They develop public awareness campaigns to promote necessary attitudes, rescue skills and behaviour to prevent drownings and water related accidents. Activities include:

Teaching swimming and lifesaving courses to children and adults. Recipients build skills in swimming, water confidence, safety, survival, rescue skills and resuscitation. Participants can progress to qualify as Pool and Beach Lifeguards, there are 27 qualifications that are internationally recognized and are available to children and adults nationwide.

Lectures and demonstrations to members of the Public and other interested parties.

Publishing literature to promote water safety and target at-risk groups. Popular posters include safe boating, safe swimming, and lifejacket posters. A Cold shock/hypothermia leaflet is also available as are many other publications.

Volunteers carry out Risk Assessments on all Bathing Areas nationwide, free of charge in order to make them safer by the erection of ring buoys, signage and other necessary action. The Local Authorities are most helpful in this regard.

Advise and assist Local Authorities on all matters relating to water safety.

The Nation’s Beach Lifeguards are tested by IWS examiners for the local authorities, free of charge prior to the annual summer season.

A programme exists in which National School teachers are coached in teaching water safety principles to their pupils.

Training all the boats crews for the Inshore Rescue Boat Service nationwide. The IWS also train and examine the Coast Guard Inshore Rescue Boats crews.

Promoting water safety along with other members of the Marine Safety Working Group and the Irish Marine Search and Rescue Committee.

National and local media actively communicates IWS safety messages to the public.

Issuing advice on all aspects of water safety. Press Releases are available all year round, which target the seasonal hazards on Irish waterways.

Organising the Annual National Lifesaving Championships; some members thn go on to compete in international events each year.

Awarding the ‘Just in Time’ Rescue Award to rescuers nationwide; other awards recognise work promoting Water Safety in Ireland.

The IWS develop a partnership approach with private sponsors to deliver safety messages to the public.

Providers of information on the locations of Lifeguarded beaches in Ireland.

History of Irish Water Safety

Before 1945, life-guarding was confined to a few counties in Ireland – that is, in Wexford, Waterford, Cork, Dublin and Clare. Indeed, the teaching of swimming and water safety as we know it was done on an ad hoc basis around the country, but mostly in the cities of Dublin and Cork where indoor swimming pools were available. It was only when a member of An Garda Síochána, Mr Harry Gillespie (who was Chairman of a small Water Safety Committee in County Clare) decided to approach the Irish Red Cross Society in May 1945 that Water Safety was established in Ireland on a formal basis.

Under the auspices of the Irish Red Cross Society, local Area Water Safety Committees were established in all of the counties of Ireland. Naturally, there was very little expertise in this country in the matter of water safety and swimming rescue, so it was decided that the American Red Cross should be approached as they had an excellent Water Safety Service running in the USA for many years. From them came the necessary approach to teaching water safety, then generally known as swimming rescue. Their booklets were also used as the basis for the first water safety manuals published by the Irish Red Cross Society (Water Safety Service).

It is worthy of note that several present members are recipients of the ‘Service Medal of Honour’ being founding members of the Water Safety Organisation in Ireland. For twenty-six years, Water Safety operated under the auspices of the Irish Red Cross Society and it was during this period that the structure of Examiners, Instructors and other voluntary (non-technical) personnel was established. During those early days, there were few indoor swimming pools in this country for the teaching of swimming and lifesaving. Much of the work was done during the Summer months at piers, quays, beaches, on riverbanks, and at lake sides. It was also during those first twenty-six years that we saw the increase in the use of lifeguards around the coast of Ireland during the summer. It must be remembered that few people could swim and fewer still could swim and save a life. Indeed, in many of the coastal towns and villages, particularly where their livelihood was derived from the sea, there was an old superstition, that it was better not to learn how to swim as it only prolonged the agony in the water when in difficulty.

Change was slow due to a lack of resources, but voluntary commitment was strong among the members, as it is to day. With time, improvements followed and a more conscious awareness of water safety began to unfold throughout the country, particularly as the seventies approached and the work of the Water Safety Service expand to every county throughout the country. The leading light at that time was a man called Plunkett Walsh, an employee of the Irish Red Cross Society with special responsibility for Water Safety. His great enthusiasm was an inspiration to all involved in the Water Safety Service to promote water safety awareness. However, his untimely and sudden death left a great void within the organisation.

Following this, in 1971 an approach was made to the Minister of Local Government who agreed to the establishment of the Irish Water Safety Association under the auspices of the Department of Local Government. This move was universally welcomed, albeit tinged with certain sadness on leaving the Irish Red Cross, with whom water safety had been for twenty-five years. The first Chairman of the Irish Water Safety Association was Mr Desmond Kenny who was from Galway.

With the establishment of the Irish Water Safety Association came an upsurge in membership, to meet the growing demand for swimming and lifesaving instruction throughout the country. In turn, this demand led to the construction of many indoor swimming pools and improved bathing facilities in many parts of Ireland. Shortly after the establishment of the Irish Water Safety Association, it was invited to join both Federation International De Sauvetage and World Life Saving, both international bodies dealing with water safety and rescue.

In 1987, a Government decision was made resulting in the IWSA being amalgamated with fire and road safety under the auspices of the National Safety Council. The members continued to give exceptional time and effort on a voluntary basis to ensure that swimming and lifesaving was taught nationwide and Water Safety went from strength to strength and the number of voluntary members involved continued to grow. Certificates issued for swimming and lifesaving increased annually, and the ‘Water Safety Awareness’ campaign was promulgated nationwide. With the encouragement of the National Safety Council, water safety personnel played an active role in the formation of the new International Life Saving Federation, which was established in 1994.

1995 was the 50th anniversary of the formation of Water Safety under the auspices of the Irish Red Cross, the Irish Water Safety Association and the National Safety Council. To mark this occasion, a suitable medal was struck to honour those who had given long and valued service throughout those fifty years. In November 1996 at a meeting of the Board of the National Safety Council, it was agreed that Water Safety be known as Water Safety Ireland. In the National Budget of 1998, it was announced that the Government had set a side the necessary finance to re-establish Water Safety as a singular organisation. The effect of this decision being that Water Safety was to leave the National Safety Council. The decision to establish Water Safety as the Irish Water Safety Association with its Headquarters in Galway took effect in November 1999. A Council of 12 persons was appointed with Mr Frank Nolan (a retired member of An Garda Siochana) being appointed as Chairman. The functions of the new body are similar to those that have been traditionally carried out over the past fifty-five years.

The new Association, which is the Statutory Water Safety Body for Ireland, is financed by Government, Local Authorities, fund-raising and sponsorship. The Association continues to be actively involved with International Life Saving (the world body) and co-operates with the other national organisations involved in water safety and rescue.

On the 25th August 2000, in front of a large audience, Minister of State, Mr Robert Molloy, TD, opened the new Headquarters of Irish Water Safety close to the Spanish Arch in Galway City. Irish Water Safety is governed by the Council, which is appointed by the Government for three years, supported by a full-time permanent staff. The functions of the Association are supported nationwide on a voluntary basis through 28 area Water Safety Committees and two special Committees (one within the Irish Police Force and the other within the Defence Forces). Persons who give exceptional Service over 25 to 50 years receive the ‘Medal of Honour with Bar’. Persons outside the Association, who have been supportive of Irish Water Safety over a number of years, can be honoured with a Life Governorship of the Association. Ten persons so far have been conferred with this honour.

The Irish Water Safety Motto: 'Every Person a Swimmer and Every Swimmer a Lifesaver' 

Irish Water Safety (IWS), The Long Walk, Galway. Tel: 1890 420202, Fax: 091 564700, Email: [email protected]

 

Other IWS Afloat posts here:

Summer Rain adds to danger

Published in Organisations
Page 11 of 11

Dublin Bay

Dublin Bay on the east coast of Ireland stretches over seven kilometres, from Howth Head on its northern tip to Dalkey Island in the south. It's a place most Dubliners simply take for granted, and one of the capital's least visited places. But there's more going on out there than you'd imagine.

The biggest boating centre is at Dun Laoghaire Harbour on the Bay's south shore that is home to over 1,500 pleasure craft, four waterfront yacht clubs and Ireland's largest marina.

The bay is rather shallow with many sandbanks and rocky outcrops, and was notorious in the past for shipwrecks, especially when the wind was from the east. Until modern times, many ships and their passengers were lost along the treacherous coastline from Howth to Dun Laoghaire, less than a kilometre from shore.

The Bay is a C-shaped inlet of the Irish Sea and is about 10 kilometres wide along its north-south base, and 7 km in length to its apex at the centre of the city of Dublin; stretching from Howth Head in the north to Dalkey Point in the south. North Bull Island is situated in the northwest part of the bay, where one of two major inshore sandbanks lie, and features a 5 km long sandy beach, Dollymount Strand, fronting an internationally recognised wildfowl reserve. Many of the rivers of Dublin reach the Irish Sea at Dublin Bay: the River Liffey, with the River Dodder flow received less than 1 km inland, River Tolka, and various smaller rivers and streams.

Dublin Bay FAQs

There are approximately ten beaches and bathing spots around Dublin Bay: Dollymount Strand; Forty Foot Bathing Place; Half Moon bathing spot; Merrion Strand; Bull Wall; Sandycove Beach; Sandymount Strand; Seapoint; Shelley Banks; Sutton, Burrow Beach

There are slipways on the north side of Dublin Bay at Clontarf, Sutton and on the southside at Dun Laoghaire Harbour, and in Dalkey at Coliemore and Bulloch Harbours.

Dublin Bay is administered by a number of Government Departments, three local authorities and several statutory agencies. Dublin Port Company is in charge of navigation on the Bay.

Dublin Bay is approximately 70 sq kilometres or 7,000 hectares. The Bay is about 10 kilometres wide along its north-south base, and seven km in length east-west to its peak at the centre of the city of Dublin; stretching from Howth Head in the north to Dalkey Point in the south.

Dun Laoghaire Harbour on the southside of the Bay has an East and West Pier, each one kilometre long; this is one of the largest human-made harbours in the world. There also piers or walls at the entrance to the River Liffey at Dublin city known as the Great North and South Walls. Other harbours on the Bay include Bulloch Harbour and Coliemore Harbours both at Dalkey.

There are two marinas on Dublin Bay. Ireland's largest marina with over 800 berths is on the southern shore at Dun Laoghaire Harbour. The other is at Poolbeg Yacht and Boat Club on the River Liffey close to Dublin City.

Car and passenger Ferries operate from Dublin Port to the UK, Isle of Man and France. A passenger ferry operates from Dun Laoghaire Harbour to Howth as well as providing tourist voyages around the bay.

Dublin Bay has two Islands. Bull Island at Clontarf and Dalkey Island on the southern shore of the Bay.

The River Liffey flows through Dublin city and into the Bay. Its tributaries include the River Dodder, the River Poddle and the River Camac.

Dollymount, Burrow and Seapoint beaches

Approximately 1,500 boats from small dinghies to motorboats to ocean-going yachts. The vast majority, over 1,000, are moored at Dun Laoghaire Harbour which is Ireland's boating capital.

In 1981, UNESCO recognised the importance of Dublin Bay by designating North Bull Island as a Biosphere because of its rare and internationally important habitats and species of wildlife. To support sustainable development, UNESCO’s concept of a Biosphere has evolved to include not just areas of ecological value but also the areas around them and the communities that live and work within these areas. There have since been additional international and national designations, covering much of Dublin Bay, to ensure the protection of its water quality and biodiversity. To fulfil these broader management aims for the ecosystem, the Biosphere was expanded in 2015. The Biosphere now covers Dublin Bay, reflecting its significant environmental, economic, cultural and tourism importance, and extends to over 300km² to include the bay, the shore and nearby residential areas.

On the Southside at Dun Laoghaire, there is the National Yacht Club, Royal St. George Yacht Club, Royal Irish Yacht Club and Dun Laoghaire Motor Yacht Club as well as Dublin Bay Sailing Club. In the city centre, there is Poolbeg Yacht and Boat Club. On the Northside of Dublin, there is Clontarf Yacht and Boat Club and Sutton Dinghy Club. While not on Dublin Bay, Howth Yacht Club is the major north Dublin Sailing centre.

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