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Dublin Bay Boating News and Information

Displaying items by tag: canoeing

#LiffeyDescent - The Irish Mirror has posted footage of a daring rescue of two kayakers stranded after their tandem canoe crashed into a bridge support during the recent Liffey Descent.

The incident occurred at Leixlip bridge on the Dublin/Kildare border during the annual canoe and kayak race on Saturday 26 September.

In the video, British kayakers Sam Weller and Steven Bush can clearly be seen fighting against the fast current after their boat crashes into the bridge and splits in two.

But volunteers from Dublin Scouts immediately raced into action from the bridge overhead, abseiling down to the water to ensure the men's safety.

Bush confirmed that their brush with danger "hasn't put us off kayaking and we can't wait to come back next year and hopefully complete the race."

Neil Fleming and Robin Koenders's K2 was the fastest vessel home at this year's Liffey Descent, the 56th running of the canoe and kayak race, as previously reported on Afloat.ie.

Published in Kayaking

#CanoeingLiffeyDescent: Neil Fleming and Robin Koenders were the fastest crew home at the 56th Liffey Descent today. In a race run in warm sunshine and light winds from Straffan to Islandbridge, the K2 of Fleming and Dutchman Koenders gained a considerable lead by Lucan over nearest challengers Gary Mawer and Barry Watkins. The winning time of one hour 48 minutes 32 seconds was outside the record for the course.

 The fastest K1 paddler was Tom Brennan, winning this class for the first time, and coming home well under two hours.

 Jenny Egan and her boyfriend Jon Simmons won the mixed K2. They set a new record time of one hour 53 minutes and 26 seconds.

Liffey Descent 2015 (Selected Results)

K2: 1 R Koenders, N Fleming 1 hour 48 minutes 32 seconds, 2 B Watkins, G Mawer 1:51.00, 3 L Van Riet, E Van Riet (Sth Africa) 1:51.42. Junior: C Crate, J O’Hagan 2:05.04. Master: D Halton, J Morrissey 2:02.51.

K1: 1 T Brennan 1:56.22, 2 J Boyton 1:59.38, 3 M Brennan 1:59.44. Junior: E Forristal 2:05.35.

K2 Mixed: J Simmons, J Egan 1:53.26.

Wildwater - Junior: C Clarke 2:19.16

General Purpose – Junior: 2:35.34. Masters: J Mescal 2:31.30. Veteran: E Moran 2:43.36.

Published in Liffey Descent

#Canoeing: Ireland C1 paddler Liam Jegou finished outside the top 10 nations at the canoe sprint World Championships in Lee Valley in England today and missed out on this chance of qualifying the boat for the Olympic Games. Jegou went off second in his semi-final and had a penalty-free run down the course, but his time of 106.29 seconds was not fast enough to stand in the top 10 nations. Jegou came in 27th, ahead of Italy and Canada. Spain, Portugal and Australia also missed out.  

Canoe Slalom World Championships, Lee Valley, London, Day Five (Irish interest)

Men

C1 – Semi-Finals (10 to Final): 27 L Jegou 106.29

K1 – Team Final: 19 Ireland 161.62

 

Published in Canoeing

#Canoeing: Cade Ryan was the most impressive of Ireland’s three competitors in the K1 at the canoe slalom World Championships in Lee Valley in England today. Ryan clocked 90.42 seconds and 89.69 in the two runs, with no penalties on either. Elliott Davidson and Sam Curtis were pushed well down the rankings, through penalties on both runs.  

Canoe Slalom World Championships, Lee Valley, London, Day Three (Irish interest)

Men

K1 – First Run (top 30 to Semi-Finals): 60 C Ryan 90.42; 98 S Curtis 145.17 (incl 54 seconds penalty); 102 E Davidson 203.59 (incl 104 sec pen). Second Run (10 qualify): 27 Ryan 89.69; 41 Davidson 99.06 (incl 6 sec pen); 65 Curtis 146.05 (incl 56 sec pen).

Published in Canoeing

#Canoeing: Liam Jegou qualified for the semi-final of the canoe slalom World Championships in Lee Valley, England today. The France-based teenager produced an impressive, penalty-free, second run in the C1 to place ninth, with 10 places available. In his first run, he incurred penalties on gates eight and 11 and had four seconds in penalties, but would have fallen outside qualification in any case. Jake Cochrane placed 68th and 64th in his two runs.

Canoe Slalom World Championships, Lee Valley, London, Day Two (Irish interest)

Men

C1 – First Run (top 20 to semi-finals): 37 L Jegou 95.98 seconds (incl 4 sec pen); J Cochrane 161.15 (incl 54 sec pen). Second Run (10 qualify): 9 Jegou 90.83; 64 Cochrane 108.38 (incl 8 sec pen).

Women

C1 – First Run (top 15 to semi-finals) 32 C O’Ferrall 191.62; Second Run: O’Ferrall 132.14 (incl 4 sec pen)

Published in Canoeing

#CANOEING: Jenny Egan finished fourth, in a photo finish, in the final of the K1 5000 metres at the European Games in Azerbaijan today. Egan was just .455 of a second off matching the bronze medal she achieved at the European Canoe Sprint Championships in the Czech Republic in May. That race was won by Maryna Litvinchuk of Belarus, who again took gold today in Baku. Britain’s Lani Belcher, who was second, and Renata Csay of Hungary edged Egan out of medal contention. Both were within .7 of a second of Egan’s time.

Earlier Jenny Egan finished sixth in the B final of the K1 500 metres, 15th overall. Andrzej Jezierski finished fourth in the B Final of the men’s C1 200 metres, 13th overall. Peter Egan finished 21st in the men’s K1 5,000 metres.

European Games 2015, Baku, Azerbaijan

Canoe Sprint (Irish interest)

Men

C1 200 – B Finals (Places 10 to 18): 4 A Jezierski 42.244 seconds.

K1 5000 – Final: 21 P Egan 23 mins 13.183.

Women

K1 500 – B Final (Places 10 to 18): 6 J Egan 2 min 11.396 seconds.

K1 5000 – Final: 1 Belarus (M Litvinchuk) 22 min 48.990 secs, 2 Britain (L Belcher) 23:05.625, 3 Hungary (R Csay) 23:05.851; 4 Ireland (J Egan) 23:06.306.

Published in Canoeing

#CANOEING: Ireland’s Andrzej Jezierski qualified for the B Final (places 10 to 18) of the men’s C1 200 metres at the European Games in Baku, Azerbaijan today. Jezierski finished sixth in his heat but improved to fifth in his semi-final. Jenny Egan will compete in the B Final of the K1 500, having qualified on Sunday. She made the semi-finals in the K1 200m but her eighth-placing there means she did not make it through to the A or B final. She is also set to compete in the K1 5000m straight final tomorrow.

Peter Egan and Simas Dobrovolskis finished eighth of eight in their heat of the K2 200m and did not qualify for the semi-finals, while Tom Brennan in the K1 200 made it to the semi-finals but finished outside the qualification mark for the A and B Finals.

European Games 2015, Baku, Azerbaijan

Canoe Sprint (Irish interest)

Men

K2 200 – Heat One: 8 P Egan, S Dobrovolskis 35:049.

K1 200 – Heat Two: 6 T Brennan 35.446. Semi-Final: 8 Brennan 36.191.

C1 200 – Heat One: 6 A Jezierski 42.339 seconds. Semi-Final One: 5 Jezierski 40.277

Women

K1 200 – Heat Three: 6 J Egan 42.843. Semi-Final Two: 8 J Egan 42.657.

K1 500 – Heat One: 6 J Egan 1:55.468. Semi-Final: 7 J Egan 1:52.536.

Published in Canoeing

#CANOEING: Jenny Egan finished seventh in the K1 5,000 metres at the Canoe Sprint World Cup in Duisburg in Germany today. The race was won by Lani Belcher of Britain, and Britain also took bronze through Louisa Sawers, with Serbian Kristina Bedec second. Egan took a bronze medal at the European Championships in this event, but she was over half a minute behind Sawers today

Canoe Sprint World Cup, Duisburg, Germany (Irish interest)

Men

Paracanoeing: KL3 200 – Final: 1 Germany (T Kierey) 41.305, 2 Russia (A Voronkov) 42.247, 3 Britain (T Lodge) 42.891; 4 Ireland (T O’Leary) 43.486.

Women

K1 5,000m: 7 J Egan 22 min 24.634.

Published in Canoeing

#CANOEING: Jenny Egan qualified for the semi-final of the K1 200 metres by finishing fourth in her heat this evening at the Canoe Sprint World Cup in Duisburg. Egan also qualified for semi-finals of the K1 500m, but finished seventh and takes a place in the the C Final (places 19 to 27). Barry Watkins and Michael Fitzsimons, in the K2 1,000, also qualified for the semi-finals, but their ninth-place finish meant they missed out on the C Final. Tom Brennan qualified for the semi-final of the K1 200m. Ireland will have at least one finalist, as paracanoeist Pat O’Leary took second in his heat of the KL3 200 metres.

Canoe Sprint World Cup, Duisburg, Germany (Irish interest)

Men, KL3 200m – Heat Two (First Three Directly to Final; rest to Semi-Final): 1 Germany (T Keirey) 41.870 seconds, 2 Ireland (P O’Leary) 44.245, 3 Russia (V Potanin) 44.658.

K2 1000m – Heat Four: 6 B Watkins, M Fitzsimons 3:21.908. Semi-Final Three: 9 Watkins, Fitzsimons 3:21.699.

K2 200 – Heat One: 9 P Egan, S Dobrovolskis 34.976.

K1 200m – Heat Three: 5 T Brennan 37.462

Women

K1 200 – Heat One: 4 J Egan 44.171 seconds (to Semi-Final).

500m – Heat One: 7 J Egan 1:57.293. Semi-Final Three: 7 Egan 1:55.688.

Published in Canoeing

#CANOEING: Jenny Egan and Tom Brennan moved into B Finals but Andrzej Jezierski did not start his semi-final of the C1 200 at the European Canoe Sprint Championships in Racice in the Czech Republic. Egan was competing in the K1 200 and Brennan in the men’s equivalent. Peter Egan and Simas Dobrovolskis finished eighth in their heat and did not make it to the semi-final.

European Canoe Sprint Championships, Racice, Czech Republic (Selected Results; Irish interest)

Men

K2 200 – Heat Three (First Three to A Final; 4-7 to B Final; rest out): 1 Serbia 31.676; 8 P Egan, S Dobrovolskis 34.808.

C1 200 - Heat Three (Winner to Final; second to seventh to semi-final): 1 Portugal (H Silva) 39.236; 7 A Jezierski 43.220. Semi-Final: Jezierski did not start.

K1 200 – Heat Two: 6 T Brennan 37.596. Semi-Final (First Three to A Final, 4-7 to B Final): 1 Latvia (A Rumjancevs) 36.072; 7 T Brennan 37.852

Women

K1 200 – Heat Three (Winner to Final; second to seventh to semi-final): 1 Serbia (N Moldovan) 40.236; 7 J Egan 43.384. Semi-Final (First Three to A Final, 4-7 to B Final): 1 Russia (N Podolskaya) 42.196; 7 Egan 45.344.

Published in Canoeing
Page 3 of 11

Dublin Bay

Dublin Bay on the east coast of Ireland stretches over seven kilometres, from Howth Head on its northern tip to Dalkey Island in the south. It's a place most Dubliners simply take for granted, and one of the capital's least visited places. But there's more going on out there than you'd imagine.

The biggest boating centre is at Dun Laoghaire Harbour on the Bay's south shore that is home to over 1,500 pleasure craft, four waterfront yacht clubs and Ireland's largest marina.

The bay is rather shallow with many sandbanks and rocky outcrops, and was notorious in the past for shipwrecks, especially when the wind was from the east. Until modern times, many ships and their passengers were lost along the treacherous coastline from Howth to Dun Laoghaire, less than a kilometre from shore.

The Bay is a C-shaped inlet of the Irish Sea and is about 10 kilometres wide along its north-south base, and 7 km in length to its apex at the centre of the city of Dublin; stretching from Howth Head in the north to Dalkey Point in the south. North Bull Island is situated in the northwest part of the bay, where one of two major inshore sandbanks lie, and features a 5 km long sandy beach, Dollymount Strand, fronting an internationally recognised wildfowl reserve. Many of the rivers of Dublin reach the Irish Sea at Dublin Bay: the River Liffey, with the River Dodder flow received less than 1 km inland, River Tolka, and various smaller rivers and streams.

Dublin Bay FAQs

There are approximately ten beaches and bathing spots around Dublin Bay: Dollymount Strand; Forty Foot Bathing Place; Half Moon bathing spot; Merrion Strand; Bull Wall; Sandycove Beach; Sandymount Strand; Seapoint; Shelley Banks; Sutton, Burrow Beach

There are slipways on the north side of Dublin Bay at Clontarf, Sutton and on the southside at Dun Laoghaire Harbour, and in Dalkey at Coliemore and Bulloch Harbours.

Dublin Bay is administered by a number of Government Departments, three local authorities and several statutory agencies. Dublin Port Company is in charge of navigation on the Bay.

Dublin Bay is approximately 70 sq kilometres or 7,000 hectares. The Bay is about 10 kilometres wide along its north-south base, and seven km in length east-west to its peak at the centre of the city of Dublin; stretching from Howth Head in the north to Dalkey Point in the south.

Dun Laoghaire Harbour on the southside of the Bay has an East and West Pier, each one kilometre long; this is one of the largest human-made harbours in the world. There also piers or walls at the entrance to the River Liffey at Dublin city known as the Great North and South Walls. Other harbours on the Bay include Bulloch Harbour and Coliemore Harbours both at Dalkey.

There are two marinas on Dublin Bay. Ireland's largest marina with over 800 berths is on the southern shore at Dun Laoghaire Harbour. The other is at Poolbeg Yacht and Boat Club on the River Liffey close to Dublin City.

Car and passenger Ferries operate from Dublin Port to the UK, Isle of Man and France. A passenger ferry operates from Dun Laoghaire Harbour to Howth as well as providing tourist voyages around the bay.

Dublin Bay has two Islands. Bull Island at Clontarf and Dalkey Island on the southern shore of the Bay.

The River Liffey flows through Dublin city and into the Bay. Its tributaries include the River Dodder, the River Poddle and the River Camac.

Dollymount, Burrow and Seapoint beaches

Approximately 1,500 boats from small dinghies to motorboats to ocean-going yachts. The vast majority, over 1,000, are moored at Dun Laoghaire Harbour which is Ireland's boating capital.

In 1981, UNESCO recognised the importance of Dublin Bay by designating North Bull Island as a Biosphere because of its rare and internationally important habitats and species of wildlife. To support sustainable development, UNESCO’s concept of a Biosphere has evolved to include not just areas of ecological value but also the areas around them and the communities that live and work within these areas. There have since been additional international and national designations, covering much of Dublin Bay, to ensure the protection of its water quality and biodiversity. To fulfil these broader management aims for the ecosystem, the Biosphere was expanded in 2015. The Biosphere now covers Dublin Bay, reflecting its significant environmental, economic, cultural and tourism importance, and extends to over 300km² to include the bay, the shore and nearby residential areas.

On the Southside at Dun Laoghaire, there is the National Yacht Club, Royal St. George Yacht Club, Royal Irish Yacht Club and Dun Laoghaire Motor Yacht Club as well as Dublin Bay Sailing Club. In the city centre, there is Poolbeg Yacht and Boat Club. On the Northside of Dublin, there is Clontarf Yacht and Boat Club and Sutton Dinghy Club. While not on Dublin Bay, Howth Yacht Club is the major north Dublin Sailing centre.

© Afloat 2020