Menu
Allianz and Afloat - Supporting Irish Boating

Ireland's sailing, boating & maritime magazine

Dublin Bay Boating News and Information

Displaying items by tag: castletownbere

Castletownbere RNLI has officially opened its new lifeboat station and facilities on the Beara Peninsula in West Cork. The entire project cost €950,000 and has resulted in the volunteer lifeboat crew moving from the temporary accommodation, where they were based for 15 years, to a more central location. The move has resulted in the launch time of the lifeboat being halved.

Over four hundred people turned out for the ceremony and service of dedication where afterwards they took the opportunity to take a tour of the new station and pontoon, where the all-weather lifeboat Annette Hutton is moored.

Accepting the station and facilities into the care of the Institution, John Coyle, Chairperson of the RNLI Irish Council said, "This day stands as a testament to years of hard work by the people of Castletownbere.  Long before there was a station here the people of Castletownbere supported the lifeboats. What this station has achieved in less than two decades is nothing short of remarkable.

Today we spare a thought for those whom we have lost to the sea and we hope that this station will be a symbol of hope and reassurance to those families whose loved ones are involved with the sea whether through work or pleasure."

Aflaot.ie correspondent Tom MacSweeney officially declared the facilities open.  Speaking about the station he said, "This is an impressive building, providing facilities which are essential for the lifeboat crew and to which they are entitled.  They deserve every support and facility in the difficult and dangerous task which they undertake; saving lives at sea.

The modern facilities here might only have been the dream of past lifeboat crews, today they are welcome, adding to this voluntary service.  There is no greater service which a human being can give to another than to risk one's own life. May you always be available to those in peril from the sea and may the sea always be kind to you."

castletownberelifeboatcrew

Castletownbere RNLI volunteer lifeboat crew L-R Killian Martin-Sullivan, Ciara O’Driscoll and Cian Murphy at yesterday's new station opening. Photo: Provision

Speaking on behalf of all the volunteers involved with Castletownbere RNLI, Lifeboat Operations Manager Tony O'Sullivan concluded, "Castletownbere lifeboat is well equipped to provide a first class rescue service to all marine traffic in the vicinity.  Together with other organisations the crew in Castletownbere provides an excellent service to their community.  The crew is ready and willing to respond to a call for help no matter what time of day and whatever the weather."

The volunteer lifeboat crew moved into the new station late last year after spending 15 years in temporary accommodation at Dinish Island.  The ambitious building project includes a two storey lifeboat station with an adjoining pontoon from where the station's Severn class all weather lifeboat launches.  The station houses a crew changing room, RNLI shop, training room and an operations office.

Casltetownbere RNLI has launched 223 times since the lifeboat was first put on service. Its crews have rescued 288 people and saved 30 lives. Last year alone, the lifeboat launched 10 times, bringing 12 people to safety. Five of those services took place in the dark while the volunteer crew spent 258 service hours at sea.

Among those in attendance at the event were John Nolan, Chairman of the Castletownbere RNLI Lifeboat Management Group, Father Sean O'Shea, RNLI Chaplain and Reverend Paul Willoughby, who both performed a service of dedication.

 

Published in RNLI Lifeboats

Castletownbere RNLI will today officially open its new lifeboat station in west county Cork.

Afloat.ie correspondent Tom MacSweeney will declare the building open at a special ceremony beginning at 2.30pm which will include a service of dedication where the boathouse will be blessed and the official handing over of the station from the institution to Castletownbere RNLI.

The event will mark a significant milestone in the station's 16 year history as the new building and facilities will greatly enhance the operational capability of Castletownbere's all-weather Severn class lifeboat Annette Hutton, and support the crew in their work of saving lives at sea.

The volunteer lifeboat crew moved into the new station late last year after spending 15 years in temporary accommodation at Dinish Island.
The new station and pontoon has been built on reclaimed land in Castletownbere and the new location means that the lifeboat crew can respond to callouts even faster.

The entire project cost €950,000 and includes a two storey lifeboat station with an adjoining pontoon from where the station's Severn class all weather lifeboat launches.  The station houses a crew changing room, RNLI shop, training room and an operations office.

The building was designed by Gordon Philips who has worked on seven RNLI lifeboat stations for the charity. Work on the lifeboat station was carried out by Castletownbere construction and the pontoon was constructed by Crowley Engineering in Cork.

The project was made possible by the provision, from the Department of Agriculture, Food and Marine, to the RNLI of a plot of reclaimed land on which the station was built.  It has provided the lifeboat crew with the perfect location from which to launch.

Casltetownbere RNLI has launched 223 times since the lifeboat was first put on service. Its crews have rescued 288 people and saved 30 lives. Last year alone, the lifeboat launched 10 times, bringing 12 people to safety. Five of those services took place in the dark while the volunteer crew spent 258 service hours at sea.

Throughout its history, there have been a great variety of call outs - sometimes long in duration, sometimes brief. There have been moments of humour and occasionally tragic circumstances. Two particular rescues, undertaken in difficult circumstances received commendation from the RNLI's Operations Director Michael Vlasto. These included the rescue of a seriously injured fisherman on the Skellig Dawn in February 2002 and the rescue of the Saint Gothard in February 2007.

Back in August 2004, when the station's crew travelled to RNLI Headquarters in Poole to receive their Severn class all weather lifeboat, they brought the Queen who was officially opening the RNLI College for a trip around the harbour on their new lifeboat.

In July 2007, Castletownbere launched with their neighbours in Baltimore following reports of a capsized rib in heavy seas with one man missing. While the man was rescued by lifeboat crew, the call out turned out to be part of the biggest drugs seizure in the state making headlines across the world.

Speaking ahead of this afternoon's ceremony, Paul Stevens, Castletownbere RNLI Second Coxswain and Volunteer Lifeboat Press Officer said the opening ceremony will provide a special opportunity for the West Cork community to welcome the station's new home: 'Since Castletownbere lifeboat station was established in 1997, we have been very fortunate in the level of support we have received both locally and from further afield. We have dedicated lifeboat volunteers and supporters and now we have a station that reflects that.  The official opening ceremony will give us the opportunity to thank all those who organised fundraising activities, events, contributed financially or helped in any way to get us to this point as well as allowing us to acknowledge and thank our crew both past and present.'

Among those who will join Tom MacSweeney in officiating at today's ceremony will be John Nolan, chairman of the Castletownbere RNLI Lifeboat Management Group, John Coyle, chairman of the Irish RNLI Council, Tony O'Sullivan, Castletownbere RNLI Lifeboat Operations Manager, Father Sean O'Shea, RNLI Chaplain and Reverend Paul Willoughby

Published in RNLI Lifeboats

A website launched by West Cork fishermen says now is the time to reform the Common Fisheries Policy because 'Ireland continues to gift the EU with €1billion of fish annually from Irish national waters'.

The website is supported with significant statistics showing Ireland's low rights compared with European neighbours.

Ireland, a peripheral island with some of the richest fishing waters in the E.U. and a three thousand mile coastline, get a mere 4% of the valuable demersal (bottom feeding fish) quotas.  This is meant to serve over 2,000 vessels while, as the website says 'our so called partners take over one billion Euro per annum from what we call our water'.

More on http://fishingforjustice.eu

 

 

Published in Fishing
Tagged under

#Rescue - The Irish Times reports on the rescue of five fishermen of West Cork this morning (21 February) after their fishing trawler was stranded in strong coastal winds.

RNLI Castletownbere's lifeboat crew responded to the trawler Anders Nees after its propeller fouled some 6km south of Bere Island in the early hours.

The stricken fishing boat was subsequently towed back to Castletownbere.

Published in Rescue

#RNLI - The Southern Star reports that Castletownbere RNLI in West Cork has a found a permanent home with the construction of a new station and pontoon.

Coxswain Brian O'Driscoll told the paper that the new station was "a long time coming".

The new €950,000 facility, replacing temporary accommodation that the lifeboat crews had occupied for 15 years, was build on reclaimed land provided by the Department of the Marine.

It comprises a two-storey lifeboat station and a pontoon from where the all-weather lifeboat can be launched for missions such as the fishing trawler grounded off Bere Island last month.

When completed, the building will also boast a crew changing room, training room, operations office and a charity shop.

The new station is scheduled to be open in the spring. The Southern Star has more on the story HERE.

Published in RNLI Lifeboats

#rnli – Castletownbere lifeboat crew responded to an early morning callout on Saturday when they launched at 5am to reports that a Spanish fishing trawler had grounded at Ard na Kinna on the western point of Bere Island in Cork.  The 33 metre vessel had eleven crewmembers onboard.

The Castletownbere lifeboat under Coxswain Brian O'Driscoll pulled up alongside the grounded vessel and assisted some of the crew onboard the lifeboat.  Images taken from the RNLI lifeboat camera show the transfer and the crew were safely evacuated. They had not sustained any injuries during the incident.

Commenting on the callout Paul Stevens Castletownbere RNLI lifeboat press officer said, "None of the crew were in any immediate danger but for their own safety we evacuated them from the grounded vessel.  They are very fortunate that they sustained no injuries and that conditions were excellent at the time of the grounding."

The vessel was successfully refloated at 4pm yesterday.

Published in RNLI Lifeboats

#rnli – There was a tragic end to an afternoon sail for a father and son in an Enterprise sailing dinghy in West Cork yesterday. As reported earlier on Afloat.ie the Castletownbere lifeboat was launched shortly after 9.30pm on Monday night to search for a man who was reported by his son to be clinging to an upturned boat. The son had managed to make his way ashore after spending four hours clinging to the boat with his father.

Castletownbere RNLI was involved in the subsequent search and recovery for the man in the early hours of this morning (Tuesday). A search at sea and along the shore continued all last evening in good weather conditions and at about ten past one in the morning, the casualty was spotted by a helicopter in a place known locally as Cod's Head. He was recovered by the Derrynane inshore boat to the Castletownbere lifeboat and brought to Castletownbere.

Sadly the man did not survive his ordeal and Lifeboat spokesman Paul Stevensl extended his sympathy on behalf of Castletownbere RNLI to the family of the deceased who has been named locally as John O'Leary from Allihies.

Early yesterday evening it is understood that the father and his teenage son went sailing in a small dingy off Allihies in West Cork and shortly after that the boat capsized. Both hung on to the upturned craft for approximately four hours where upon the teenage son made his way ashore and raised the alarm.

Stevens said the whole Beara Pennisula would be shocked by the loss: 'The Beara Pennisula is waking up this morning with a huge sense of shock. It's no stranger to this sort of tragedy sadly. However, every time an incident like this occurs, of course it has great impact on many people in what is really a very small tight knit community. Moreover, this week is festival week in the village of Allihes where John was from, so this sad tragedy will in the midst of the people of Allihes have changed the mood locally to one of great sadness and great sense of loss'.

Published in RNLI Lifeboats

#NAVAL SERVICE – Within a space of seven days the Naval Service OPV L.E. Roisin (P51) detained two foreign registered fishing vessels for alleged breaches of fishing regulations.

The most recent detainment was on Tuesday where a UK registered trawler was approximately 33 nautical miles off Mizen Head, Co. Kerry. The detained vessel was escorted to Castletownbere and handed over to the Gardai.

As previously reported on Afloat.ie the other detention took place last week where a Spanish fishing vessel was 150 miles south-west off Co. Clare. and likewise the trawler was escorted to Castletownbere.

To date the Naval Service have carried out 426 boardings, issued 17 warnings and detained four vessels so far in 2012. The navy last year carried out 1,313 boardings and eight detentions of vessels off the Irish Coast.

Published in Navy

#IRISH HARBOURS - Yachts berthing at Ireland's main fishing harbours could see their charges hiked by an incredible 800 per cent.

According to The Irish Times, Marine Minister Simon Coveney has announced a mere 21 days for comment and consultation on the draft Fishery Harbour Centres (Rates and Charges) Order 2012. The consultation document is attached to the bottom of this post and available to download as a pdf.

The proposed new charges include an annual fee of €250 per metre for yachts, which could see a 10-metre yacht currently paying €312 a year for a berth shell out as much as €2,500 annually for the same space.

Additional water and electricity costs could even see this bill rise to €3,100 - for berths that come "without proper marina facilities in most cases".

The proposals apply to the State's six fishery centres at Killybegs, Rossaveal, Dingle, Castletownbere, Dunmore East and Howth, only two of which have pontoons suitable for leisure boats.

The Irish Times has more on the story HERE.

Published in Irish Harbours

#RESCUE - The Irish Times reports that an Air Corps maritime patrol aircraft joined a search and rescue mission to evacuate a fisherman off the West Cork coast today.

The Casa CN 235 - one of two operated by the Air Corps - diverted from its daily patrol to provide a communications relay in the operation to rescue an injured crewman from a Spanish fishing boat some 100 miles south of of Castletownbere.

The fisherman was airlifted by an Irish Coast Guard helicopter which at last report was taking him to medical attention in Cork.

Published in Rescue
Page 5 of 6

Dublin Bay

Dublin Bay on the east coast of Ireland stretches over seven kilometres, from Howth Head on its northern tip to Dalkey Island in the south. It's a place most Dubliners simply take for granted, and one of the capital's least visited places. But there's more going on out there than you'd imagine.

The biggest boating centre is at Dun Laoghaire Harbour on the Bay's south shore that is home to over 1,500 pleasure craft, four waterfront yacht clubs and Ireland's largest marina.

The bay is rather shallow with many sandbanks and rocky outcrops, and was notorious in the past for shipwrecks, especially when the wind was from the east. Until modern times, many ships and their passengers were lost along the treacherous coastline from Howth to Dun Laoghaire, less than a kilometre from shore.

The Bay is a C-shaped inlet of the Irish Sea and is about 10 kilometres wide along its north-south base, and 7 km in length to its apex at the centre of the city of Dublin; stretching from Howth Head in the north to Dalkey Point in the south. North Bull Island is situated in the northwest part of the bay, where one of two major inshore sandbanks lie, and features a 5 km long sandy beach, Dollymount Strand, fronting an internationally recognised wildfowl reserve. Many of the rivers of Dublin reach the Irish Sea at Dublin Bay: the River Liffey, with the River Dodder flow received less than 1 km inland, River Tolka, and various smaller rivers and streams.

Dublin Bay FAQs

There are approximately ten beaches and bathing spots around Dublin Bay: Dollymount Strand; Forty Foot Bathing Place; Half Moon bathing spot; Merrion Strand; Bull Wall; Sandycove Beach; Sandymount Strand; Seapoint; Shelley Banks; Sutton, Burrow Beach

There are slipways on the north side of Dublin Bay at Clontarf, Sutton and on the southside at Dun Laoghaire Harbour, and in Dalkey at Coliemore and Bulloch Harbours.

Dublin Bay is administered by a number of Government Departments, three local authorities and several statutory agencies. Dublin Port Company is in charge of navigation on the Bay.

Dublin Bay is approximately 70 sq kilometres or 7,000 hectares. The Bay is about 10 kilometres wide along its north-south base, and seven km in length east-west to its peak at the centre of the city of Dublin; stretching from Howth Head in the north to Dalkey Point in the south.

Dun Laoghaire Harbour on the southside of the Bay has an East and West Pier, each one kilometre long; this is one of the largest human-made harbours in the world. There also piers or walls at the entrance to the River Liffey at Dublin city known as the Great North and South Walls. Other harbours on the Bay include Bulloch Harbour and Coliemore Harbours both at Dalkey.

There are two marinas on Dublin Bay. Ireland's largest marina with over 800 berths is on the southern shore at Dun Laoghaire Harbour. The other is at Poolbeg Yacht and Boat Club on the River Liffey close to Dublin City.

Car and passenger Ferries operate from Dublin Port to the UK, Isle of Man and France. A passenger ferry operates from Dun Laoghaire Harbour to Howth as well as providing tourist voyages around the bay.

Dublin Bay has two Islands. Bull Island at Clontarf and Dalkey Island on the southern shore of the Bay.

The River Liffey flows through Dublin city and into the Bay. Its tributaries include the River Dodder, the River Poddle and the River Camac.

Dollymount, Burrow and Seapoint beaches

Approximately 1,500 boats from small dinghies to motorboats to ocean-going yachts. The vast majority, over 1,000, are moored at Dun Laoghaire Harbour which is Ireland's boating capital.

In 1981, UNESCO recognised the importance of Dublin Bay by designating North Bull Island as a Biosphere because of its rare and internationally important habitats and species of wildlife. To support sustainable development, UNESCO’s concept of a Biosphere has evolved to include not just areas of ecological value but also the areas around them and the communities that live and work within these areas. There have since been additional international and national designations, covering much of Dublin Bay, to ensure the protection of its water quality and biodiversity. To fulfil these broader management aims for the ecosystem, the Biosphere was expanded in 2015. The Biosphere now covers Dublin Bay, reflecting its significant environmental, economic, cultural and tourism importance, and extends to over 300km² to include the bay, the shore and nearby residential areas.

On the Southside at Dun Laoghaire, there is the National Yacht Club, Royal St. George Yacht Club, Royal Irish Yacht Club and Dun Laoghaire Motor Yacht Club as well as Dublin Bay Sailing Club. In the city centre, there is Poolbeg Yacht and Boat Club. On the Northside of Dublin, there is Clontarf Yacht and Boat Club and Sutton Dinghy Club. While not on Dublin Bay, Howth Yacht Club is the major north Dublin Sailing centre.

© Afloat 2020