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Dublin Bay Boating News and Information

Displaying items by tag: coastguard station

#COASTGUARD - The Office of Public Works has given the go-ahead to a long-awaited new coastguard station for Killybegs, the Donegal Democrat reports.

The multi-million-euro three-storey station - replacing the current 20-year-old building, which is deemed no longer suitable to demands - will be constructed at the Rough Point and will include a boat house and pollution control centre.

The Irish Coast Guard unit at Killybegs has 25 volunteer members, and also operates as a mountain and cliff rescue service. The unit serves one of Ireland's busiest ports.

The Donegal Democrat has more on the story HERE.

Published in Coastguard
Ever dreamt of owning your own coastguard station? Now you have the chance!
The Old Coastguard Station in Dromard, Co Sligo is an historic five-bedroom property on seven acres with 1,000ft of sea frontage and stunning views across Sligo Bay, on the market for €2,175,000.
Within, the preserved stone building - which dates from 1873 - has been refurbished as bright and spacious accomodation, with all internal woodwork in solid light oak.
Rooms are spread over two levels, comprising three reception rooms, a study, an office, library and the watchtower, as well as five bedrooms (for en suite), five bathrooms, the kitchen, utility room, pantry and other rooms once used for storing equipment and munitions during the building's former life.
The front of the property hosts a split-level lawn enclosed by stone walls and shrubbery to give protection from the elements. At the rear is a 300sqm sheltered courtyard with an original freshwater well and a number of modernised outbuildings, such as garages and a greenhouse.
The property also comes with its original boathouse and slipway to a small sandy beach.
Prospective owners can stay connected with full broadband and landline service, while the internet-accessible CCTV system will give extra peace of mind.
The Old Coastguard Station is located south of Ballisadare Bay just five minutes from Beltra and 18 minutes from Sligo town in an area known for its top-class golf courses and fishing spots. Yachtsmen especially will be pleased to know that Sligo Yacht Club is just a short sail away.
More details including photos are available from Waterside Properties and Knight Frank Estate Agents.

Ever dreamt of owning your own coastguard station? Now you have the chance!

The Old Coastguard Station in Dromard, Co Sligo is an historic five-bedroom property on seven acres with 1,000ft of sea frontage and stunning views across Sligo Bay, on the market for €2,175,000.

Within, the preserved stone building - which dates from 1873 - has been refurbished as bright and spacious accomodation, with all internal woodwork in solid light oak. 

Rooms are spread over two levels, comprising three reception rooms, a study, an office, library and the watchtower, as well as five bedrooms (for en suite), five bathrooms, the kitchen, utility room, pantry and other rooms once used for storing equipment and munitions during the building's former life.

The front of the property hosts a split-level lawn enclosed by stone walls and shrubbery to give protection from the elements. At the rear is a 300sqm sheltered courtyard with an original freshwater well and a number of modernised outbuildings, such as garages and a greenhouse.

The property also comes with its original boathouse and slipway to a small sandy beach. 

Prospective owners can stay connected with full broadband and landline service, while the internet-accessible CCTV system will give extra peace of mind.

The Old Coastguard Station is located south of Ballisadare Bay just five minutes from Beltra and 18 minutes from Sligo town in an area known for its top-class golf courses and fishing spots. Yachtsmen especially will be pleased to know that Sligo Yacht Club is just a short sail away. 

More details including photos are available from Waterside Properties and Knight Frank Estate Agents.

Published in Waterfront Property
This weekend sees the Dublin Bay Prawn Festival (1-3 April) take place at Howth Harbour and throughout the peninsula, writes Jehan Ashmore.
Throughout the three-day festival which starts this Friday, a wide ranging programme of events and activities will be held at the north county Dublin fishing and yachting harbour.

A Sampi trail will be held in various pubs and hotels on the Friday night starting at 7pm, no booking is required. On the Saturday afternoon there is a Prawn Shelling Competition starting at 2.30pm.

Howth Yacht Club will open its doors to public viewing on the Saturday and the Howth Coastguard Station (West Pier) will also be open on that day too in addition to the Sunday. The West Pier is also to host a Fishing Techniques demonstration on Sunday at 3pm.

On the mornings of Saturday and Sunday a self-guided walk from Howth to up to Howth Hill taking up to two hours will meet at The Courthouse at 10am. The walk which is to be pre-booked and registered online is also suitable for families. The route is weather dependant and will follow one of the four looped walks.

The Irish Seal Sactuary will be offering a seal watching tour and harbour walks guided by volunteers on the Saturday and Sunday. An information stand will be made available for more details click www.irishsealsanctuary.ie

Throughout the weekend there will be all day events which include island boat / eco tour trips and the National Transport Musuem, noting that these activities will be charged. It should be noted that festival programme is provisional and is subject to change.

For more information about the full festival programme logon HERE and by contacting Howth Tourist Office on 01 8396955 and by email: [email protected]

Published in Coastal Notes

Clare County Council granted planning permission for a €1.9 million coastguard station at Doolin. The new station will have capacity for three boats will be one of the biggest of its kind in Ireland. More from the Clare People HERE

Published in Coastguard

Dublin Bay

Dublin Bay on the east coast of Ireland stretches over seven kilometres, from Howth Head on its northern tip to Dalkey Island in the south. It's a place most Dubliners simply take for granted, and one of the capital's least visited places. But there's more going on out there than you'd imagine.

The biggest boating centre is at Dun Laoghaire Harbour on the Bay's south shore that is home to over 1,500 pleasure craft, four waterfront yacht clubs and Ireland's largest marina.

The bay is rather shallow with many sandbanks and rocky outcrops, and was notorious in the past for shipwrecks, especially when the wind was from the east. Until modern times, many ships and their passengers were lost along the treacherous coastline from Howth to Dun Laoghaire, less than a kilometre from shore.

The Bay is a C-shaped inlet of the Irish Sea and is about 10 kilometres wide along its north-south base, and 7 km in length to its apex at the centre of the city of Dublin; stretching from Howth Head in the north to Dalkey Point in the south. North Bull Island is situated in the northwest part of the bay, where one of two major inshore sandbanks lie, and features a 5 km long sandy beach, Dollymount Strand, fronting an internationally recognised wildfowl reserve. Many of the rivers of Dublin reach the Irish Sea at Dublin Bay: the River Liffey, with the River Dodder flow received less than 1 km inland, River Tolka, and various smaller rivers and streams.

Dublin Bay FAQs

There are approximately ten beaches and bathing spots around Dublin Bay: Dollymount Strand; Forty Foot Bathing Place; Half Moon bathing spot; Merrion Strand; Bull Wall; Sandycove Beach; Sandymount Strand; Seapoint; Shelley Banks; Sutton, Burrow Beach

There are slipways on the north side of Dublin Bay at Clontarf, Sutton and on the southside at Dun Laoghaire Harbour, and in Dalkey at Coliemore and Bulloch Harbours.

Dublin Bay is administered by a number of Government Departments, three local authorities and several statutory agencies. Dublin Port Company is in charge of navigation on the Bay.

Dublin Bay is approximately 70 sq kilometres or 7,000 hectares. The Bay is about 10 kilometres wide along its north-south base, and seven km in length east-west to its peak at the centre of the city of Dublin; stretching from Howth Head in the north to Dalkey Point in the south.

Dun Laoghaire Harbour on the southside of the Bay has an East and West Pier, each one kilometre long; this is one of the largest human-made harbours in the world. There also piers or walls at the entrance to the River Liffey at Dublin city known as the Great North and South Walls. Other harbours on the Bay include Bulloch Harbour and Coliemore Harbours both at Dalkey.

There are two marinas on Dublin Bay. Ireland's largest marina with over 800 berths is on the southern shore at Dun Laoghaire Harbour. The other is at Poolbeg Yacht and Boat Club on the River Liffey close to Dublin City.

Car and passenger Ferries operate from Dublin Port to the UK, Isle of Man and France. A passenger ferry operates from Dun Laoghaire Harbour to Howth as well as providing tourist voyages around the bay.

Dublin Bay has two Islands. Bull Island at Clontarf and Dalkey Island on the southern shore of the Bay.

The River Liffey flows through Dublin city and into the Bay. Its tributaries include the River Dodder, the River Poddle and the River Camac.

Dollymount, Burrow and Seapoint beaches

Approximately 1,500 boats from small dinghies to motorboats to ocean-going yachts. The vast majority, over 1,000, are moored at Dun Laoghaire Harbour which is Ireland's boating capital.

In 1981, UNESCO recognised the importance of Dublin Bay by designating North Bull Island as a Biosphere because of its rare and internationally important habitats and species of wildlife. To support sustainable development, UNESCO’s concept of a Biosphere has evolved to include not just areas of ecological value but also the areas around them and the communities that live and work within these areas. There have since been additional international and national designations, covering much of Dublin Bay, to ensure the protection of its water quality and biodiversity. To fulfil these broader management aims for the ecosystem, the Biosphere was expanded in 2015. The Biosphere now covers Dublin Bay, reflecting its significant environmental, economic, cultural and tourism importance, and extends to over 300km² to include the bay, the shore and nearby residential areas.

On the Southside at Dun Laoghaire, there is the National Yacht Club, Royal St. George Yacht Club, Royal Irish Yacht Club and Dun Laoghaire Motor Yacht Club as well as Dublin Bay Sailing Club. In the city centre, there is Poolbeg Yacht and Boat Club. On the Northside of Dublin, there is Clontarf Yacht and Boat Club and Sutton Dinghy Club. While not on Dublin Bay, Howth Yacht Club is the major north Dublin Sailing centre.

© Afloat 2020