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Dublin Bay Boating News and Information

Displaying items by tag: fish kill

#FishKill - A Carlow farmer has pleaded guilty to the accidental discharge of 'deleterious matter' into the River Burren at Cloontoose on 10 June last year, resulting in a fish kill that cost as many as 5,000 brown trout.

At a sitting of the District Court at Carlow Court House on Thursday 2 January, Judge O’Brien awarded costs of €2,135 to Inland Fisheries Ireland (IFI) and ordered that the farmer pay a contribution for habitat works.

The incident related to the release of fungicide to the river during the filling a a crop sprayer.

Donnachadh Byrne, senior fisheries environmental officer with IFI, told Judge O’Brien that following receipt of a fish kill report from Carlow County Council on Monday 10 June, IFI carried out investigations on the River Burren and had established that the fish kill extended over 4.2km with an estimate of 4,000-5,000 dead brown trout.

Giving details of sampling and analysis undertaken, Byrne confirmed that samples of dead fish taken from the Burren River when sent for analysis were found to have elevated concentrations of Pyraclostrobin, one of the main active ingredients of the fungicide Lumen, used to treat barley or oats, which was being used by the defendant.

The court was informed that the spillage of fungicides to the Burren River was accidental and related to a non-return valve which upon later inspection was found to be faulty,

These facts were acknowledged by IFI, who also confirmed that the defendant was fully co-operative at all times during the investigation.

The Burren River fish kill which extended over 4.2 kilometres, related to a relatively small discharge of pesticide to the Burren River.

IFI said the incident highlights the extreme toxicity of certain pesticides to the aquatic environment, as what was a relatively small discharge of pesticide extended to a stretch of more than 4.2km of the watercourse.

Published in Inland Waterways
Tagged under

#FishKill - Inland Fisheries Ireland has secured a successful prosecution of a Galway-based construction company over a fish kill on the River Dodder in South Dublin earlier this year.

Ward and Burke Construction Ltd of Stradbally East, Kilcolgan, Co Galway was convicted and fined €2,000 by Judge William Hamill at a sitting of the District Court at the Four Courts on Monday 14 October.

The judge found in favour of Inland Fisheries Ireland (IFI) who took the prosecution following its investigation into the fish kill, which saw some 500 freshwater fish - including juvenile brown trout, lamprey and stoneloach - deceased over a 2km stretch of the River Dodder in the Tallaght area from below an outfall from Boherboy Water Supply Pipeline to a point upstream of Firhouse Weir.

Giving details of the sampling and analysis undertaken, IFI fisheries environmental officer Brian Beckett confirmed the discharge from the water supply pipeline to the Dodder was characterised by seriously elevated levels of chlorine.

Beckett said that on the afternoon of 1 March 2013, he instructed staff from Ward and Burke Construction Ltd to immediately terminate the discharge, and prevent all remaining effluent residues from entering the watercourse. Ward and Burke staff were found to be fully co-operative at all times during the investigation.

Legal representatives for Ward and Burke who had earlier told Judge Hamill there was a plea in the matter said that the discharge occurred as a result of human error, and as soon as this had come to their attention they had taken steps to prevent any further discharge.

It was also submitted that the construction firm had committed to provision of a sum of money to cover restocking or other appropriate costs to mitigate against damage caused as a result of the discharge.

Judge Hamill convicted Ward and Burke Construction Ltd and imposed a fine of €2000 and awarded legal costs and expenses to Inland Fisheries Ireland.

Published in Inland Waterways
Tagged under

#FishKill - Staff with Inland Fisheries Ireland (IFI) are investigating two separate fish kill incidents on Lough Keeldra in Co Leitrim and in the Camlin River in Longford town.

Considerable numbers of dead perch were recorded at Lough Keeldra, outside Mohill, following a report to IFI on 10 September. Live fish also observed in the lake were noted to be in distress.

The presence of blue/green algae is currently being considered as part of the investigations. Lough Keeldra is a designated bathing area and signs erected by Leitrim County Council prohibit bathing at present.

Elsewhere, more than 2,000 fish mortalities were recorded over a 6km stretch of the Camlin River from Cartron Bridge downstream as far as the confluence with the River Shannon after IFI staff began their investigation on 4 September following a tip-off from the public.

Brown trout, roach, pike, eel and white-clawed crayfish were among the dead fish discovered, although live fish have since been recorded within the affected area.

Water samples have been taken for analysis and IFI continuing with its investigation to try to identify the source of the pollution that caused the fish kill. This may not be possible given the fact that the fish kill is believed to have occurred on the weekend of the 1 September.

Members of the public are being urged to note that after a prolonged period of low flow levels and unseasonably high water temperatures, all aquatic life - but especially fish - are extremely vulnerable to the slightest deterioration in water quality.

Landowners and the owners of any premises or property that adjoins a watercourse should take particular care to ensure that every reasonable measure is taken to minimise any threat to water quality and fish life.

IFI is appealing to the public to report any incident or suspected incident of pollution or deterioration of water quality and sightings of distressed fish.

Amanda Mooney, director for the Shannon River Basin District, said: “Whether an incident occurs deliberately or inadvertently, it is critical for fish welfare and general water quality that incidents can be dealt with promptly.”

Inland Fisheries Ireland operates a confidential 24 hour hotline and suspected illegal fishing or pollution can be reported to 1890 347 424.

Published in Inland Waterways

#Angling - Inland Fisheries Ireland (IFI) is seeking the help of anglers and the general public to report any sightings of distressed fish due to high water temperatures or low water levels. 

The national fisheries body also requests that anglers voluntarily cease using keep nets during this period, so as not to cause unintentional distress to fish kept for long periods in these nets.

Reports may be made to the local fisheries offices or the 24-hour hotline number on 1890 34 74 24. 

IFI staff will continue to monitor canals, lakes and rivers for any signs of distressed fish in shallow water, but may be able to react more quickly to timely reports received.

"Low water levels and high water temperatures may lead to fish kills," said IFI chief Dr Ciaran Byrne, "and as the temperatures for salmon and trout are perilously hot at the moment, fish kills may be unavoidable. In many instances, moving fish may also prove too stressful. 

"Anglers practicing catch and release during this hot spell may wish to consider desisting from fishing until conditions are more favourable."

Minister Fergus O'Dowd also urged anglers and the public to "please be vigilant and help conserve our wonderful inland fisheries resource".

Local Fisheries Offices contacts:

  • IFI Swords – 01 884 2600
  • IFI Limerick – 061 300 238
  • IFI Blackrock – 01 278 7022
  • IFI Galway – 091 563 118
  • IFI Clonmel – 052 618 0055
  • IFI Ballina – 096 22788
  • IFI Macroom – 026 41222
  • IFI Ballyshannon – 071 985 1435
Published in Angling

#Angling - The World Youth Fly Fishing Championship is coming to Ireland's border region next month.

And as the Carrick Times reports, Carrickfergus in Co Antrim is looking forward to hosting part of the event at the Woodford Fly Fishery.

What's more, local lad and Woodford member Darren Crawford will be among the all-Ireland fly fishing squad vying for the international title at the event, co-sponsored by the Loughs Agency and Inland Fisheries Ireland.

Rivers and lakes hosting the competition are spread over the counties of Antrim, Louth, Monaghan, Meath and Tyrone.

In other inland fisheries news, Galway Bay FM reports that testing carried out after a fish kill in Loughrea Lake last month found no evidence of any bacterial or viral outbreak.

The cause of the incident that killed 100 perch in the lake are still unclear, though stresses connected with the spawning season are a distinct possibility.

Published in Angling

#FishKill - Galway Bay FM reports on an investigation into a fish kill discovered in Loughrea Lake yesterday 12 May.

Inland Fisheries Ireland staff have attended the scene after being alerted by the public, discovering some 100 dead perch in the water.

However, it is believed the fish died as a result of a natural phenomenon, as no dead fish of any other species was found.

Such mortalities in the wake of the perch spawning season are not uncommon due to the stresses it puts on the fish, leaving them susceptible to infection.

Published in Inland Waterways

#FishKill - Accidental pollution from a farm in Co Kerry has resulted in a fish kill on a tributary of the Ballyline River.

Inland Fisheries Ireland were contacted by Kerry County Council on Saturday 16 March after being altered by a farmer to a slurry spill on his property in the Kilgarvan area of Ballylongford.

Upon arriving at the farm, IFI officers found one side of the slurry pit wall had collapsed, resulting in a large slurry spill. Two cattle were also injured in the incident and had to be put down. 

The slurry went into a watercourse that eventually flows into the Shannon Estuary at Ballylongford Bay.

The farmer had carried out emergency measures on site attempting to contain the slurry and also trying to minimise the impact to fish and wildlife downstream.

Fisheries officers carried out a visual inspection downstream but as the slurry was still passing there was strong discolouration and so it was impossible to see any dead fish. Samples were taken and sent for analysis immediately.

The situation was monitored over the weekend, and a full walkover of the stream was carried out as the water cleared on Tuesday 19 March.

IFI can confirm that a fish kill took place as a result of the pollution incident, and that 150 brown trout, hundreds of stickleback, one eel and one flounder were recovered. The section of river downstream from the farm to Gortanacooka Bridge was the most heavily impacted.

Currently there is a buildup of organic sediment in the river from the farm to the first bridge in Graffa Bog, which IFI says will not disperse until there is a flood in the river. 

The farm was also inspected on the evening of 19 March and the water within the watercourse was clear. The investigation continues.

Published in Inland Waterways

#FishKill - Inland Fisheries Ireland (IFI) staff are continuing their investigation into the deaths into some 500 freshwater fish in the River Dodder late last week.

The fish kill is now thought to cover a 2km stretch of the river in the Tallaght area of south Dublin, and species affected include adult and juvenile brown trout, lamprey and stoneloach.

According to the IFI, live fish were recorded immediately upstream and downstream of the affected area.

As previously reported on Afloat.ie, the fisheries body is following a definite line of enquiry regarding the source of the contamination that caused what Redmond O'Hanlon of the Dodder Anglers Group called the worst fish kill he had witnessed "in 30 years".

Published in Inland Waterways

#InlandWaterways - Reports indicate that as many as 500 freshwater fish of various species have been found dead in the River Dodder in Tallaght, south Dublin.

The fish kill was discovered on Friday evening upstream of the Old Bawn bridge, and according to the Irish Independent, Inland Fisheries Ireland says samples have been taken from the scene - and that a possible source has been identified.

However, the fisheries body refused to comment on speculation that the fish kill was a result of discharge from industrial waste or illegal dumping.

The fish kill covers a 600-metre stretch of the river in the south Dublin suburb.

Speaking to The Irish Times, Redmond O’Hanlon of the Dodder Anglers Group said it is the worst fish kill he has witnessed "in 30 years".

Published in Inland Waterways

#INLAND WATERWAYS - Fisheries environmental officers at Inland Fisheries Ireland received reports of a fish kill in the Kiltha River in Castlemartyr, Co Cork from anglers late on Saturday 11 August last.

The investigation which initiated early the following morning revealed that many thousands of brown trout fry, parr and adults, salmon fry and parr, brook lamprey, stickleback and stone loach were killed.

The fish kill affected a 5.5km section of the Kiltha River from Mogeely downstream to its confluence with the Dower River.

The Kiltha River is an important salmonid spawning and nursery tributary of the Womanagh River which flows east into the sea at Youghal Harbour. This fish kill is particularly disappointing as the Womanagh River, which is currently closed to salmon angling, had been responding well to management and has seen its fish populations increase over the past several years.

The effects of the pollutant which entered the river were quick-acting, indicating that the pollutant was of a toxic nature.

Inland Fisheries Ireland is awaiting test results of water samples to determine the nature of the pollutant. While this analysis is taking place IFI’s investigation into the cause of the kill is continuing with several potential sources being examined.

The news comes just weeks after reports of fish mortalities along a 9km stretch of the River Vartry in Co Wicklow.

Members of the public are reminded that Inland Fisheries Ireland operates a confidential 24 hour hotline and suspected illegal fishing or pollution can be reported to 1890 347 424 or for easier recall 1890 FISH 24.

Published in Inland Waterways
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Dublin Bay

Dublin Bay on the east coast of Ireland stretches over seven kilometres, from Howth Head on its northern tip to Dalkey Island in the south. It's a place most Dubliners simply take for granted, and one of the capital's least visited places. But there's more going on out there than you'd imagine.

The biggest boating centre is at Dun Laoghaire Harbour on the Bay's south shore that is home to over 1,500 pleasure craft, four waterfront yacht clubs and Ireland's largest marina.

The bay is rather shallow with many sandbanks and rocky outcrops, and was notorious in the past for shipwrecks, especially when the wind was from the east. Until modern times, many ships and their passengers were lost along the treacherous coastline from Howth to Dun Laoghaire, less than a kilometre from shore.

The Bay is a C-shaped inlet of the Irish Sea and is about 10 kilometres wide along its north-south base, and 7 km in length to its apex at the centre of the city of Dublin; stretching from Howth Head in the north to Dalkey Point in the south. North Bull Island is situated in the northwest part of the bay, where one of two major inshore sandbanks lie, and features a 5 km long sandy beach, Dollymount Strand, fronting an internationally recognised wildfowl reserve. Many of the rivers of Dublin reach the Irish Sea at Dublin Bay: the River Liffey, with the River Dodder flow received less than 1 km inland, River Tolka, and various smaller rivers and streams.

Dublin Bay FAQs

There are approximately ten beaches and bathing spots around Dublin Bay: Dollymount Strand; Forty Foot Bathing Place; Half Moon bathing spot; Merrion Strand; Bull Wall; Sandycove Beach; Sandymount Strand; Seapoint; Shelley Banks; Sutton, Burrow Beach

There are slipways on the north side of Dublin Bay at Clontarf, Sutton and on the southside at Dun Laoghaire Harbour, and in Dalkey at Coliemore and Bulloch Harbours.

Dublin Bay is administered by a number of Government Departments, three local authorities and several statutory agencies. Dublin Port Company is in charge of navigation on the Bay.

Dublin Bay is approximately 70 sq kilometres or 7,000 hectares. The Bay is about 10 kilometres wide along its north-south base, and seven km in length east-west to its peak at the centre of the city of Dublin; stretching from Howth Head in the north to Dalkey Point in the south.

Dun Laoghaire Harbour on the southside of the Bay has an East and West Pier, each one kilometre long; this is one of the largest human-made harbours in the world. There also piers or walls at the entrance to the River Liffey at Dublin city known as the Great North and South Walls. Other harbours on the Bay include Bulloch Harbour and Coliemore Harbours both at Dalkey.

There are two marinas on Dublin Bay. Ireland's largest marina with over 800 berths is on the southern shore at Dun Laoghaire Harbour. The other is at Poolbeg Yacht and Boat Club on the River Liffey close to Dublin City.

Car and passenger Ferries operate from Dublin Port to the UK, Isle of Man and France. A passenger ferry operates from Dun Laoghaire Harbour to Howth as well as providing tourist voyages around the bay.

Dublin Bay has two Islands. Bull Island at Clontarf and Dalkey Island on the southern shore of the Bay.

The River Liffey flows through Dublin city and into the Bay. Its tributaries include the River Dodder, the River Poddle and the River Camac.

Dollymount, Burrow and Seapoint beaches

Approximately 1,500 boats from small dinghies to motorboats to ocean-going yachts. The vast majority, over 1,000, are moored at Dun Laoghaire Harbour which is Ireland's boating capital.

In 1981, UNESCO recognised the importance of Dublin Bay by designating North Bull Island as a Biosphere because of its rare and internationally important habitats and species of wildlife. To support sustainable development, UNESCO’s concept of a Biosphere has evolved to include not just areas of ecological value but also the areas around them and the communities that live and work within these areas. There have since been additional international and national designations, covering much of Dublin Bay, to ensure the protection of its water quality and biodiversity. To fulfil these broader management aims for the ecosystem, the Biosphere was expanded in 2015. The Biosphere now covers Dublin Bay, reflecting its significant environmental, economic, cultural and tourism importance, and extends to over 300km² to include the bay, the shore and nearby residential areas.

On the Southside at Dun Laoghaire, there is the National Yacht Club, Royal St. George Yacht Club, Royal Irish Yacht Club and Dun Laoghaire Motor Yacht Club as well as Dublin Bay Sailing Club. In the city centre, there is Poolbeg Yacht and Boat Club. On the Northside of Dublin, there is Clontarf Yacht and Boat Club and Sutton Dinghy Club. While not on Dublin Bay, Howth Yacht Club is the major north Dublin Sailing centre.

© Afloat 2020