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Displaying items by tag: inland waters

#InlandWaters - Four weeks after its review by a joint Oireachtas committee, there is still an "information vacuum" regarding feedback on the proposed changes to Ireland's canal bye-laws, according to the Inland Waterways Association of Ireland (IWAI).

A meeting organised by the IWAI at a rally in Hazelhatch on the Grand Canal over the Easter weekend heard surprise among members that none of the some 2,000 individual submissions have been acknowledged, nor have these submissions been published on the Waterways Ireland website.

Members also expressed disappointment that no timeframe for the submissions review process has been announced.

The IWAI remains steadfast in its opposition to the current proposed amendments to canal bye-laws, which were recently rejected in a unanimous vote by Kildare County Council over concerns that they "do not put user requirements, tourism development and local communities at the centre of the regulations."

Hundreds of houseboat owners on Ireland's inland waterways would also be affected by the proposed changes that could see additional charges levied on different classes of canal and river users.

Published in Inland Waterways
Tagged under
11th October 2010

Talk on Moneypenny Canoe Trail

Historian Brian Cassells will give a 'TALK & SCREEN SHOW' - on buliding the Moneypenny Canoe Trail next Thursday evening at 7pm, October 21st. 

The talk takes place at the Millennium Arts Centre, William Street, Portadown.

More on Northern Ireland's Canoe trails HERE

More on the Moneypenny trail HERE

Inland Waterways

Published in Inland Waterways
Waterways Ireland has issued a notice tu users of the Grand Canal on the inland waterways that a section of the canal, extending from the 34th Lock to the 35th Lock inclusive, will be closed to navigation between 1st November 2010 and 14th March 2011 to facilitate the following improvement works to the Shannon Harbour area:

PROVISION OF HOUSE BOAT BERTHING AREA

The works site will extend from Griffith Bridge for approximately 350m eastwards of the bridge. Temporary dams will be constructed in the vicinity of this site. Due to low and/or possibly fluctuating water levels between the site and the 34th Lock, it is strongly advised that boats should not be moored between the site and the 34th Lock. Adequate berthage is available East of the 34th Lock. There will be no pedestrian or vehicular access through the work site. Pedestrian and vehicular entry/exit access will be via the south canal bank at L'Estrange Bridge for the duration of the works.

TRANS-SHIPMENT SHED CANOPY REMOVAL AND ASSOCIATED REMEDIAL WORKS
These works will extend for a period of approximately six weeks from November 1st 2010. Boats will not be permitted to moor in the vicinity of the work site during this period. The work site will extend from the 35th Lock for approximately 125m Eastwards, to a point approximately 15m beyond the Eastern gable of the trans-shipment shed. There will be no vessel mooring in the vicinity of the work site. There will be no pedestrian or vehicular access along the northerly canal bank from Griffith Bridge towards the 35th and 36th Locks for the site work duration.

Published in Inland Waterways

Waterways Ireland has commenced the first Phase of a Public Consultation programme on proposed new Bye-laws for all seven inland waterways under its remit. Bye-laws facilitate the management of a waterway, clearly outlining the roles and responsibility of Waterways Ireland and all the people involved in using the navigation, whether for recreational or commercial purposes.

It is intended that the proposed new Bye-Laws will reflect the breadth of modern day use of the waterways; bringing consistency in navigational rules across the waterway network. The new Bye-laws are also expected to facilitate waterway users understanding of their responsibilities in sharing this multi-functional environment. Whether the waterways users are in Killaloe (Shannon Navigation), Coleraine(Lower Bann), or Tullamore (Grand Canal) the same navigational rules will apply. Due to important differences in the enabling legislation in both jurisdictions as well as legislative and court procedures, Waterways Ireland will introduce the new Bye-laws separately in Northern Ireland and Ireland.

Waterways Ireland has considered global best practice, feedback from users and stakeholders and the individual characteristics of the different waterways in developing the new Bye-laws. Future proofing the Bye-laws has been an important feature of the drafting process to ensure they remain fit for purpose.

Phase 1 of the public consultation will be directed at stakeholders; groups who represent the interests of waterways users and organisations whose statutory remit could be affected. Stakeholders in each jurisdiction will receive the relevant Bye-laws for a 12 week consultation period. Copies of the Bye-laws of the other jurisdiction are available on request from Waterways Ireland HQ. Stakeholders are requested to hold internal discussions with their constituents before providing a single response to the draft Bye-laws.

The deadline for the end of Phase 1 of the Public Consultation is the 15th October 2010. Thereafter, the entire Bye-laws will undergo a further examination and revision, informed by the analysis of the responses received. Phase 2 will only commence once this full revision has taken place.

Phase 2 of the Public Consultation Programme is public meetings. These meetings will be held along each of the waterways and will be widely advertised and open to all who wish to attend.

Prior to Phase 2 of the consultation programme, copies of the revised Bye-laws will be downloadable from the Waterways Ireland website www.waterwaysireland.org. They will be distributed to all those attending the public meetings. Alternatively, they can be issued to individuals by email or post on request.

The completion of the public consultation programme will be followed by a further revision of the Bye-laws to take account of the points raised at the public meetings. The enactment of the legislation in each jurisdiction will follow.

For further information on Phase 1 or Phase 2 of the Public Consultation process contact  [email protected] or  Tel no +44 28 6634 6202.

 

Published in Inland Waterways
Page 17 of 17

Dublin Bay

Dublin Bay on the east coast of Ireland stretches over seven kilometres, from Howth Head on its northern tip to Dalkey Island in the south. It's a place most Dubliners simply take for granted, and one of the capital's least visited places. But there's more going on out there than you'd imagine.

The biggest boating centre is at Dun Laoghaire Harbour on the Bay's south shore that is home to over 1,500 pleasure craft, four waterfront yacht clubs and Ireland's largest marina.

The bay is rather shallow with many sandbanks and rocky outcrops, and was notorious in the past for shipwrecks, especially when the wind was from the east. Until modern times, many ships and their passengers were lost along the treacherous coastline from Howth to Dun Laoghaire, less than a kilometre from shore.

The Bay is a C-shaped inlet of the Irish Sea and is about 10 kilometres wide along its north-south base, and 7 km in length to its apex at the centre of the city of Dublin; stretching from Howth Head in the north to Dalkey Point in the south. North Bull Island is situated in the northwest part of the bay, where one of two major inshore sandbanks lie, and features a 5 km long sandy beach, Dollymount Strand, fronting an internationally recognised wildfowl reserve. Many of the rivers of Dublin reach the Irish Sea at Dublin Bay: the River Liffey, with the River Dodder flow received less than 1 km inland, River Tolka, and various smaller rivers and streams.

Dublin Bay FAQs

There are approximately ten beaches and bathing spots around Dublin Bay: Dollymount Strand; Forty Foot Bathing Place; Half Moon bathing spot; Merrion Strand; Bull Wall; Sandycove Beach; Sandymount Strand; Seapoint; Shelley Banks; Sutton, Burrow Beach

There are slipways on the north side of Dublin Bay at Clontarf, Sutton and on the southside at Dun Laoghaire Harbour, and in Dalkey at Coliemore and Bulloch Harbours.

Dublin Bay is administered by a number of Government Departments, three local authorities and several statutory agencies. Dublin Port Company is in charge of navigation on the Bay.

Dublin Bay is approximately 70 sq kilometres or 7,000 hectares. The Bay is about 10 kilometres wide along its north-south base, and seven km in length east-west to its peak at the centre of the city of Dublin; stretching from Howth Head in the north to Dalkey Point in the south.

Dun Laoghaire Harbour on the southside of the Bay has an East and West Pier, each one kilometre long; this is one of the largest human-made harbours in the world. There also piers or walls at the entrance to the River Liffey at Dublin city known as the Great North and South Walls. Other harbours on the Bay include Bulloch Harbour and Coliemore Harbours both at Dalkey.

There are two marinas on Dublin Bay. Ireland's largest marina with over 800 berths is on the southern shore at Dun Laoghaire Harbour. The other is at Poolbeg Yacht and Boat Club on the River Liffey close to Dublin City.

Car and passenger Ferries operate from Dublin Port to the UK, Isle of Man and France. A passenger ferry operates from Dun Laoghaire Harbour to Howth as well as providing tourist voyages around the bay.

Dublin Bay has two Islands. Bull Island at Clontarf and Dalkey Island on the southern shore of the Bay.

The River Liffey flows through Dublin city and into the Bay. Its tributaries include the River Dodder, the River Poddle and the River Camac.

Dollymount, Burrow and Seapoint beaches

Approximately 1,500 boats from small dinghies to motorboats to ocean-going yachts. The vast majority, over 1,000, are moored at Dun Laoghaire Harbour which is Ireland's boating capital.

In 1981, UNESCO recognised the importance of Dublin Bay by designating North Bull Island as a Biosphere because of its rare and internationally important habitats and species of wildlife. To support sustainable development, UNESCO’s concept of a Biosphere has evolved to include not just areas of ecological value but also the areas around them and the communities that live and work within these areas. There have since been additional international and national designations, covering much of Dublin Bay, to ensure the protection of its water quality and biodiversity. To fulfil these broader management aims for the ecosystem, the Biosphere was expanded in 2015. The Biosphere now covers Dublin Bay, reflecting its significant environmental, economic, cultural and tourism importance, and extends to over 300km² to include the bay, the shore and nearby residential areas.

On the Southside at Dun Laoghaire, there is the National Yacht Club, Royal St. George Yacht Club, Royal Irish Yacht Club and Dun Laoghaire Motor Yacht Club as well as Dublin Bay Sailing Club. In the city centre, there is Poolbeg Yacht and Boat Club. On the Northside of Dublin, there is Clontarf Yacht and Boat Club and Sutton Dinghy Club. While not on Dublin Bay, Howth Yacht Club is the major north Dublin Sailing centre.

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