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Displaying items by tag: inland waterways

#waterwaysireland – Dawn Livingstone has been appointed Chief Executive of Waterways Ireland and takes up post at the end of July 2013.
A committed outdoor recreationalist, Dawn joined Waterways Ireland in 2002 as the Head of Strategy & Policy. She established an Equality Scheme and led the integration of accessibility into project design and maintenance programmes. In 2008 Dawn moved to become Head of Property & Legal where she has modernised the organisations approach to both property management and legal matters.
Prior to working for Waterways Ireland, Dawn was Director of Share, a Charity promoting opportunities for integration between able bodied people and people with special needs of all age's, backgrounds and abilities. During her tenure Share grew to become a 220 bed residential activity centre on 60 acres, with a 300 seat multi-purpose theatre /arts/ bar complex, 50 berth marina, and indoor leisure suite. Dawn's entrepreneurial work in this role was recognised with the award of the Gallagher's Northern Ireland Business Women of the year winner in 1988
Dawn holds an MBA from the University of Ulster. Dawn is NI Trustee to the Family Fund, a member of the Consumer Council of NI and a Trustee of the Lloyds TSB NI Foundation. Originally from Co Down, and a keen sailor and gardener, Dawn is married with two daughters.

Published in Inland Waterways

#WaterSafety - Rescue call-outs for people swimming in inland waterways have risen more than 100% over the past two months compared to the same period last year, as The Irish Times reports.

Coastguard call-outs overall have risen 50 per cent in the same timeframe, with calls to help coastal swimmers up by more than half on 2012 figures.

With the death toll from drownings during the continuing heatwave now standing at 10 after two weeks, the Irish Coast Guard has also highlighted a growing number of "close shaves" that could have doubled this already shocking figure.

According to the Irish Examiner, coastguard units throughout the country dealt with 72 incidents this past weekend alone.

These include two children rescued at Ballybunion in Co Kerry after drifting out to sea on an inflatable toy.

Published in Water Safety

#Angling - The use of prawns and shrimp as bait in salmon angling could be banned in Northern Ireland under proposed restrictions on salmon and sea trout fishing, as Farming Life reports.

Aside from the bait regulations, Stormont is also putting forward a ban on commercial salmon netting and the introduction of a catch-and-release scheme for sport anglers in an effort to reverse dwindling salmon numbers in Ulster's inland waterways.

The moves come following an earlier voluntary ban on offshore salmon fishing in an effort to bolster wild salmon stocks which were last year feared to be "around dodo levels".

Similar restrictions were proposed this year for the River Suir - although anglers in Enniscorthy won support from Inland Fisheries Ireland last year in their call to lift a shrimp bait ban on their downstream fishery on the River Slaney.

Ulster Angling Federation chair Jim Haughey has urged angling club officials across Northern Ireland to study the consultation document published by the Department of Culture, Arts and Leisure with a view to making informed submissions on the proposed changes.

Farming Life has much more on the story HERE.

Published in Angling

#Angling - Inland Fisheries Ireland (IFI) is seeking the help of anglers and the general public to report any sightings of distressed fish due to high water temperatures or low water levels. 

The national fisheries body also requests that anglers voluntarily cease using keep nets during this period, so as not to cause unintentional distress to fish kept for long periods in these nets.

Reports may be made to the local fisheries offices or the 24-hour hotline number on 1890 34 74 24. 

IFI staff will continue to monitor canals, lakes and rivers for any signs of distressed fish in shallow water, but may be able to react more quickly to timely reports received.

"Low water levels and high water temperatures may lead to fish kills," said IFI chief Dr Ciaran Byrne, "and as the temperatures for salmon and trout are perilously hot at the moment, fish kills may be unavoidable. In many instances, moving fish may also prove too stressful. 

"Anglers practicing catch and release during this hot spell may wish to consider desisting from fishing until conditions are more favourable."

Minister Fergus O'Dowd also urged anglers and the public to "please be vigilant and help conserve our wonderful inland fisheries resource".

Local Fisheries Offices contacts:

  • IFI Swords – 01 884 2600
  • IFI Limerick – 061 300 238
  • IFI Blackrock – 01 278 7022
  • IFI Galway – 091 563 118
  • IFI Clonmel – 052 618 0055
  • IFI Ballina – 096 22788
  • IFI Macroom – 026 41222
  • IFI Ballyshannon – 071 985 1435
Published in Angling

#Angling - The World Youth Fly Fishing Championship is coming to Ireland's border region next month.

And as the Carrick Times reports, Carrickfergus in Co Antrim is looking forward to hosting part of the event at the Woodford Fly Fishery.

What's more, local lad and Woodford member Darren Crawford will be among the all-Ireland fly fishing squad vying for the international title at the event, co-sponsored by the Loughs Agency and Inland Fisheries Ireland.

Rivers and lakes hosting the competition are spread over the counties of Antrim, Louth, Monaghan, Meath and Tyrone.

In other inland fisheries news, Galway Bay FM reports that testing carried out after a fish kill in Loughrea Lake last month found no evidence of any bacterial or viral outbreak.

The cause of the incident that killed 100 perch in the lake are still unclear, though stresses connected with the spawning season are a distinct possibility.

Published in Angling

#Shannon - Passages on the River Shannon in 2013 so far have fallen more than 50% compared to numbers for the same period a decade ago, according to the Irish Waterways History blog written by Afloat's inland correspondent, Brian Goggin.

Using statistics supplied by Waterways Ireland, the site plotted a graph that shows an overall decline in lock and bridge passages on the Shannon in the months from January to May each year since 2003, with a slight spike in 2007 the only buck in the downward trend.

Though the figures do not record all uses of the waterway (such as sailing, angling and other watersports) and do not account for variables such as the weather, they are indicative - the site claims - of "the Shannon's most significant tourism activity, the cruiser hire business".

Indeed, the figures apparently show that boat hire passage numbers have fallen from 11,440 in January-May 2003 to just 4,781 in the same months this year.

Even private boat passages have been falling from a peak in 2009 to just below their 2003 numbers, if the site's interpretation of the stats is anything to go by.

However, a source close to Afloat.ie says that the falling numbers may be skewed by a growing emphasis on larger-capacity vessels on Ireland's inland waterways, with eight- and 12-berth boats supplanting older four-berth vessels, and families and groups consolidating their recreational boating.

It will be interesting to see how the rest of the year turns out, and whether the overall numbers from January to December will tell a different story of the state of the Shannon and other waterways.

Published in Inland Waterways

#inland – Sailing will be centre stage when teams from around Ireland battle it out in the Grand Canal Dock, Dublin over two days for the second edition of the Inter-Counties Sailing Championship to see which county has the best sailing team. 

Notice of Race is downloadable below as a PDF.

Sailors are invited to submit a team comprising a crew of up to 5 people capable of handling a 27ft keel boat, to include at least 1 female, to represent counties in what will be the battle of the sailing tribes & colours of Ireland. Which county is the best?
Racing will comprise a series of sprint flights (heats) of approximately 20 minutes duration leading to a final to decide the winner.

With boats constantly in close quarters and potential crash situations both with each other and the immovable solid quay walls, this event promises to be a testing and thrilling experience for the sailors crewing onboard and a highly entertaining spectacle with viewing areas for spectators on the quay walls and the Grand Canal Square.

The championship will run over the weekend of 7th & 8th September 2013 from 1000hrs - 1600hrs each day.

A fleet of one design boats 27ft in length is being provided so teams can compete on a level playing field. Ownership of a boat is not necessary, and sailors and clubs wishing to enter a team to represent their county should contact Waterways Racing for more details.

The Grand Canal Dock is part of Ireland's inland waterways system and comprises 44 acres of non-tidal freshwater in Dublin's Docklands. It has its own marina, Waterways Interpretive Centre, watersports centre and is surround by a multitude of bars and restaurants and is overlooked by the majestic Bord Gáis Energy Theatre.

The event is being supported by Waterways Ireland, an all island body set up to manage & promote all of Ireland's waterways. Commenting on their support of the event "We are delighted to be involved in this sailing championship which invites participation from the whole island of Ireland in keeping with our own remit as an inter-governmental agency. We are looking forward to welcoming teams, supporters and the general public to this historic dock in Dublin for the inaugural Waterways Ireland Inter-Counties Sailing Championship" Éanna Rowe, Marketing Manager, Waterways Ireland.

Published in Inland Waterways

MARINE NOTICE

No. 73 of 2013

Shannnon Navigation

Lough Ree (South)

Hexagon Shoal Buoy – Reported Out of Position

Marine Notice No 72 refers.

The buoy has been re-located to its correct position. Marine Notice No 72 is now withdrawn.

Charles Lawn
Lt Cdr (rtd)
Inspector of Navigation
24 June 2013
Tel: 00 353 (0)90 6494232
Fax :00 353 6494147

MARINE NOTICE
No.74 of 2011

SHANNON NAVIGATION

ATHLONE

NAVIGATION RESTRICTIONS

"WATERWAYS IRELAND TRIATHLONE"

Navigation restrictions will be in place in Athlone between the Athlone By-pass bridge (M6) and the Town bridge, to facilitate the swimming element of this national event.

Fri 5 Jul 2013
17.45 to 19.15

Course Active
1 hr 30min

Practice Swim
Sat 6 Jul 2013
14.00 to 17.00
Course Active
3 hrs

Racing
Sun 7 Jul 2013
12.00 to 12.45
14.00 to 14.45
Course Active
45min 45 min
Racing

Charles Lawn
Lt Cdr (rtd)
Inspector of Navigation
24 Jun 2013.
Tel: 00 353 (0)90 6494232

Published in Inland Waterways
Tagged under

#Tourism - The world-class surfing hotspot of Sligo has failed to make the grade in Fáilte Ireland's long list of leading tourism towns for 2013, according to the Irish Independent.

The north-east county was among a surprise selection of areas known for their maritime and waterways attractions - such as Westmeath on the Shannon and Galway, host of last year's Volvo Ocean Race finale - that were not featured in the Irish tourism board's list of 45 towns and villages put forward for the Highly Commended Tourism Towns award, part of the National Tidy Towns Awards to be announced later in the year.

Counties on the water that did make the cut include Clare and Mayo, with five towns each on the list, Kerry with four - including last year's winner Portmagee - and Donegal and Waterford, represented three times each.

The top prize winner, to be announced by Fáilte Ireland in November, will receive €10,000 in supports for tourism marketing and development.

Though Sligo is conspicuous by its absence, Donegal's triple placing shows the north-east region is a big tourism attraction - and the Tripclocker blog says surfing is at the forefront of that.

With Ireland's exposure to the open Atlantic giving is "better waves more often", according to Killian O'Kelly of Bundoran's Turn n' Surf, there is a wide variety of surf beaches stretching from Donegal to Clare in particular with swells for all levels of experience.

Published in Aquatic Tourism

MARINE NOTICE

No 59 of 2013

SHANNON NAVIGATION

Lanesborough

Aquathon Swimming Event

Waterways Ireland wishes to advise masters and users of the Shannon Navigation that the above event will take place in Lanesborough on Wed 26 th Jun between 1830 hrs and 2000hrs.

Masters are requested to proceed at slow speed and with minimum wash when in this area of the navigation and to note any advice given by race marshals when approaching the course.

Waterways Ireland thanks masters for their co-operation in this matter.

C.J.Lawn

Lt Cdr (rtd)

Inspector of Navigation

12 Jun 2013

Tel: 353 90 6494232

Fax: 353 90 6494147


Published in Inland Waterways
Tagged under
Page 8 of 28

Dublin Bay

Dublin Bay on the east coast of Ireland stretches over seven kilometres, from Howth Head on its northern tip to Dalkey Island in the south. It's a place most Dubliners simply take for granted, and one of the capital's least visited places. But there's more going on out there than you'd imagine.

The biggest boating centre is at Dun Laoghaire Harbour on the Bay's south shore that is home to over 1,500 pleasure craft, four waterfront yacht clubs and Ireland's largest marina.

The bay is rather shallow with many sandbanks and rocky outcrops, and was notorious in the past for shipwrecks, especially when the wind was from the east. Until modern times, many ships and their passengers were lost along the treacherous coastline from Howth to Dun Laoghaire, less than a kilometre from shore.

The Bay is a C-shaped inlet of the Irish Sea and is about 10 kilometres wide along its north-south base, and 7 km in length to its apex at the centre of the city of Dublin; stretching from Howth Head in the north to Dalkey Point in the south. North Bull Island is situated in the northwest part of the bay, where one of two major inshore sandbanks lie, and features a 5 km long sandy beach, Dollymount Strand, fronting an internationally recognised wildfowl reserve. Many of the rivers of Dublin reach the Irish Sea at Dublin Bay: the River Liffey, with the River Dodder flow received less than 1 km inland, River Tolka, and various smaller rivers and streams.

Dublin Bay FAQs

There are approximately ten beaches and bathing spots around Dublin Bay: Dollymount Strand; Forty Foot Bathing Place; Half Moon bathing spot; Merrion Strand; Bull Wall; Sandycove Beach; Sandymount Strand; Seapoint; Shelley Banks; Sutton, Burrow Beach

There are slipways on the north side of Dublin Bay at Clontarf, Sutton and on the southside at Dun Laoghaire Harbour, and in Dalkey at Coliemore and Bulloch Harbours.

Dublin Bay is administered by a number of Government Departments, three local authorities and several statutory agencies. Dublin Port Company is in charge of navigation on the Bay.

Dublin Bay is approximately 70 sq kilometres or 7,000 hectares. The Bay is about 10 kilometres wide along its north-south base, and seven km in length east-west to its peak at the centre of the city of Dublin; stretching from Howth Head in the north to Dalkey Point in the south.

Dun Laoghaire Harbour on the southside of the Bay has an East and West Pier, each one kilometre long; this is one of the largest human-made harbours in the world. There also piers or walls at the entrance to the River Liffey at Dublin city known as the Great North and South Walls. Other harbours on the Bay include Bulloch Harbour and Coliemore Harbours both at Dalkey.

There are two marinas on Dublin Bay. Ireland's largest marina with over 800 berths is on the southern shore at Dun Laoghaire Harbour. The other is at Poolbeg Yacht and Boat Club on the River Liffey close to Dublin City.

Car and passenger Ferries operate from Dublin Port to the UK, Isle of Man and France. A passenger ferry operates from Dun Laoghaire Harbour to Howth as well as providing tourist voyages around the bay.

Dublin Bay has two Islands. Bull Island at Clontarf and Dalkey Island on the southern shore of the Bay.

The River Liffey flows through Dublin city and into the Bay. Its tributaries include the River Dodder, the River Poddle and the River Camac.

Dollymount, Burrow and Seapoint beaches

Approximately 1,500 boats from small dinghies to motorboats to ocean-going yachts. The vast majority, over 1,000, are moored at Dun Laoghaire Harbour which is Ireland's boating capital.

In 1981, UNESCO recognised the importance of Dublin Bay by designating North Bull Island as a Biosphere because of its rare and internationally important habitats and species of wildlife. To support sustainable development, UNESCO’s concept of a Biosphere has evolved to include not just areas of ecological value but also the areas around them and the communities that live and work within these areas. There have since been additional international and national designations, covering much of Dublin Bay, to ensure the protection of its water quality and biodiversity. To fulfil these broader management aims for the ecosystem, the Biosphere was expanded in 2015. The Biosphere now covers Dublin Bay, reflecting its significant environmental, economic, cultural and tourism importance, and extends to over 300km² to include the bay, the shore and nearby residential areas.

On the Southside at Dun Laoghaire, there is the National Yacht Club, Royal St. George Yacht Club, Royal Irish Yacht Club and Dun Laoghaire Motor Yacht Club as well as Dublin Bay Sailing Club. In the city centre, there is Poolbeg Yacht and Boat Club. On the Northside of Dublin, there is Clontarf Yacht and Boat Club and Sutton Dinghy Club. While not on Dublin Bay, Howth Yacht Club is the major north Dublin Sailing centre.

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