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Dublin Bay Boating News and Information

Displaying items by tag: lease

A private jetty on the Liffey has caused unrest among local anglers, the Circuit Civil Court heard on Thursday.
According to The Irish Times, the Dublin and District Salmon Anglers' Association is seeking a court order against entrepreneur David Wright - of the noted Howth family of fish suppliers - who they claim is 'disturbing the calm of the river'.
The group also accused him of trespassing on a stretch of river leased to them by Dublin City Council for exclusive fishing rights, and were obliged by their lease to protect the fishery.
It is alleged that Wright built a double jetty with retractable pontoons at the rear of two houses he owns on the riverbank in Chapelizod.
His barrister Edward Farrelly told the court he would challenge Dublin City Council's right to lease the river.

A private inland waterways jetty on the Liffey has caused unrest among local anglers, the Circuit Civil Court heard on Thursday.

According to The Irish Times, the Dublin and District Salmon Anglers' Association is seeking a court order against entrepreneur David Wright - of the noted Howth family of fish suppliers - who they claim is 'disturbing the calm of the river'.

The group also accused him of trespassing on a stretch of river leased to them by Dublin City Council for exclusive fishing rights, and were obliged by their lease to protect the fishery.

It is alleged that Wright built a double jetty with retractable pontoons at the rear of two houses he owns on the riverbank in Chapelizod. 

His barrister Edward Farrelly told the court he would challenge Dublin City Council's right to lease the river.

Published in Inland Waterways

Dublin Bay

Dublin Bay on the east coast of Ireland stretches over seven kilometres, from Howth Head on its northern tip to Dalkey Island in the south. It's a place most Dubliners simply take for granted, and one of the capital's least visited places. But there's more going on out there than you'd imagine.

The biggest boating centre is at Dun Laoghaire Harbour on the Bay's south shore that is home to over 1,500 pleasure craft, four waterfront yacht clubs and Ireland's largest marina.

The bay is rather shallow with many sandbanks and rocky outcrops, and was notorious in the past for shipwrecks, especially when the wind was from the east. Until modern times, many ships and their passengers were lost along the treacherous coastline from Howth to Dun Laoghaire, less than a kilometre from shore. 

The Bay is a C-shaped inlet of the Irish Sea and is about 10 kilometres wide along its north-south base, and 7 km in length to its apex at the centre of the city of Dublin; stretching from Howth Head in the north to Dalkey Point in the south. North Bull Island is situated in the northwest part of the bay, where one of two major inshore sandbanks lie, and features a 5 km long sandy beach, Dollymount Strand, fronting an internationally recognised wildfowl reserve. Many of the rivers of Dublin reach the Irish Sea at Dublin Bay: the River Liffey, with the River Dodder flow received less than 1 km inland, River Tolka, and various smaller rivers and streams.