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Dublin Bay Boating News and Information

Displaying items by tag: postponed

The Cork head of the river rowing event due to be held this Saturday at the Marina in the city has been postponed. The committee decided on this course of action because of the bad weather forecast for this weekend.

 “Due to the adverse weather forecast for this weekend, and after getting approval from the Domestic Events committee in RI, Cork City Regatta Committee have decided to postpone Cork Head to the following weekend, Saturday March 7th, in the interests of safety. Under Rowing Ireland rules, the draw remains in place as is," the organisers said in an email to clubs.

 

Published in Rowing

#CoastalNotes - “Even Dermot Cronin, just home from competing in the 2018 Caribbean 600 in stormy conditions more typical of the Fastnet Race, can’t compete with “The Beast from the East”!

Consequently, the weather forecast for tomorrow (Thursday 1 March) has forced Glenua to postpone his presentation in Dublin entitled: “From the Aegean to the Fastnet Race 2017-Trom agus Éadrom”, scheduled for that night.

It will take place a week later, that is, Thursday 8 March, at Poolbeg Yacht & Boat Club, Ringsend at 8pm.

There will be an entry fee of €5 in aid of the RNLI.

 

 

Published in Coastal Notes

#Rowing: The Tribesmen Head of the River, set for Lough Rynn on Saturday (February 10th) has had to be called off because of a forecast of rain and gale force gusts of wind. The organisers hope to hold a deferred event in March.

 The weather has caused a change in venue for another event. Flooding at O’Brien’s Bridge has forced the organisers of the St Michael’s Head of the River on February 24th to move it to the St Michael’s club on O’Callaghan’s Strand in Limerick.  

Published in Rowing

#Rowing: Competition in the Cork Sculling Ladder has been postponed this weekend because of the forecast of bad weather. The organisers have chosen Sunday, October 29th, as the date for the next action in the event. Jack Dorney of Shandon and Margaret Cremen of Lee top the rankings after the time trials.

Published in Rowing

#Rowing: The Olympic rowing programme for today, Sunday, has been postponed. The strong crosswinds disrupted a number of races on Saturday and left the Serbian men's pair in the water after a capsize. Ireland single sculler Sanita Puspure had complained about the conditions, saying the boats would not be put out to train in such difficult waters. Two Ireland boats, the women’s lightweight double of Sinead Lynch and Claire Lambe and the men’s lightweight double of Paul and Gary O’Donovan were due to compete in their first race today, but must now wait.

Published in Rowing

ROWING: The St Michael’s head of the river, which was to be held this Saturday, February 1st, has been postoned for three weeks. The organisers say that he forecast of “very severe” weather prompted the move. The rescheduled head will be on February 22nd. Plans to hold the Kerry and Sligo heads of the river also fell to poor weather earlier this month.

Published in Rowing
#MARINE WILDLIFE - Some 14 Marine Conservation Zones in the Irish Sea are among the network of planned marine wildlife sanctuaries around the UK that has been postponed.
The Liverpool Echo reports that the UK Department for the Environment, Food and Rural Affairs (Defra) has shelved plans to create the conservation areas by the end of 2012 after pressure from "groups that use the coastline frequently including fishermen, yachting enthusiasts and seaside villagers".
There will now be a six-month delay while and impact assessment on the network of well over 100 proposed sites is presented to the British government.
As previously reported on Afloat.ie, conservation groups have raised concerns that fewer than a quarter of the proposed sites around the UK will receive official protection.

#MARINE WILDLIFE - Some 14 Marine Conservation Zones in the Irish Sea are among the network of planned marine wildlife sanctuaries around the UK that has been postponed.

The Liverpool Echo reports that the UK Department for the Environment, Food and Rural Affairs (Defra) has shelved plans to create the conservation areas by the end of 2012 after pressure from "groups that use the coastline frequently including fishermen, yachting enthusiasts and seaside villagers".

There will now be a six-month delay while and impact assessment on the network of well over 100 proposed sites is presented to the British government.

As previously reported on Afloat.ie, conservation groups have raised concerns that fewer than a quarter of the proposed sites around the UK will receive official protection.

Published in Marine Wildlife
The annual Liffey Descent canoe race has been pushed back by a month - due to a lack of water.
The Irish Canoe Union (ICU) announced that due to significantly low water levels in the ESB reservoirs that provide the flood for the race, the event has been postponed till 8 October.
Organisers said they were left with the "difficult decision" to either postpone the event or run the things as scheduled on 10 September without the flood.
"“It is considered that the running of the race in the absence of the excitement generated by a flood would detract from its value as the premier Irish canoeing event," said a statement from the ICU.
The Liffey Swim has been an institution since 1960, atracting canoeists from around the world every September for the run from Kildare to Islandbridge.
The Irish Times has more on the story HERE.

The annual Liffey Descent canoe race has been pushed back by a month - due to a lack of water.

The Irish Canoe Union (ICU) announced that due to significantly low water levels in the ESB reservoirs that provide the flood for the race, the event has been postponed till 8 October.

Organisers said they were left with the "difficult decision" to either postpone the event or run the things as scheduled on 10 September without the flood.

“It is considered that the running of the race in the absence of the excitement generated by a flood would detract from its value as the premier Irish canoeing event," said a statement from the ICU.

The Liffey Swim has been an institution since 1960, atracting canoeists from around the world every September for the run from Kildare to Islandbridge.

The Irish Times has more on the story HERE.

Published in Canoeing

Dublin Bay

Dublin Bay on the east coast of Ireland stretches over seven kilometres, from Howth Head on its northern tip to Dalkey Island in the south. It's a place most Dubliners simply take for granted, and one of the capital's least visited places. But there's more going on out there than you'd imagine.

The biggest boating centre is at Dun Laoghaire Harbour on the Bay's south shore that is home to over 1,500 pleasure craft, four waterfront yacht clubs and Ireland's largest marina.

The bay is rather shallow with many sandbanks and rocky outcrops, and was notorious in the past for shipwrecks, especially when the wind was from the east. Until modern times, many ships and their passengers were lost along the treacherous coastline from Howth to Dun Laoghaire, less than a kilometre from shore.

The Bay is a C-shaped inlet of the Irish Sea and is about 10 kilometres wide along its north-south base, and 7 km in length to its apex at the centre of the city of Dublin; stretching from Howth Head in the north to Dalkey Point in the south. North Bull Island is situated in the northwest part of the bay, where one of two major inshore sandbanks lie, and features a 5 km long sandy beach, Dollymount Strand, fronting an internationally recognised wildfowl reserve. Many of the rivers of Dublin reach the Irish Sea at Dublin Bay: the River Liffey, with the River Dodder flow received less than 1 km inland, River Tolka, and various smaller rivers and streams.

Dublin Bay FAQs

There are approximately ten beaches and bathing spots around Dublin Bay: Dollymount Strand; Forty Foot Bathing Place; Half Moon bathing spot; Merrion Strand; Bull Wall; Sandycove Beach; Sandymount Strand; Seapoint; Shelley Banks; Sutton, Burrow Beach

There are slipways on the north side of Dublin Bay at Clontarf, Sutton and on the southside at Dun Laoghaire Harbour, and in Dalkey at Coliemore and Bulloch Harbours.

Dublin Bay is administered by a number of Government Departments, three local authorities and several statutory agencies. Dublin Port Company is in charge of navigation on the Bay.

Dublin Bay is approximately 70 sq kilometres or 7,000 hectares. The Bay is about 10 kilometres wide along its north-south base, and seven km in length east-west to its peak at the centre of the city of Dublin; stretching from Howth Head in the north to Dalkey Point in the south.

Dun Laoghaire Harbour on the southside of the Bay has an East and West Pier, each one kilometre long; this is one of the largest human-made harbours in the world. There also piers or walls at the entrance to the River Liffey at Dublin city known as the Great North and South Walls. Other harbours on the Bay include Bulloch Harbour and Coliemore Harbours both at Dalkey.

There are two marinas on Dublin Bay. Ireland's largest marina with over 800 berths is on the southern shore at Dun Laoghaire Harbour. The other is at Poolbeg Yacht and Boat Club on the River Liffey close to Dublin City.

Car and passenger Ferries operate from Dublin Port to the UK, Isle of Man and France. A passenger ferry operates from Dun Laoghaire Harbour to Howth as well as providing tourist voyages around the bay.

Dublin Bay has two Islands. Bull Island at Clontarf and Dalkey Island on the southern shore of the Bay.

The River Liffey flows through Dublin city and into the Bay. Its tributaries include the River Dodder, the River Poddle and the River Camac.

Dollymount, Burrow and Seapoint beaches

Approximately 1,500 boats from small dinghies to motorboats to ocean-going yachts. The vast majority, over 1,000, are moored at Dun Laoghaire Harbour which is Ireland's boating capital.

In 1981, UNESCO recognised the importance of Dublin Bay by designating North Bull Island as a Biosphere because of its rare and internationally important habitats and species of wildlife. To support sustainable development, UNESCO’s concept of a Biosphere has evolved to include not just areas of ecological value but also the areas around them and the communities that live and work within these areas. There have since been additional international and national designations, covering much of Dublin Bay, to ensure the protection of its water quality and biodiversity. To fulfil these broader management aims for the ecosystem, the Biosphere was expanded in 2015. The Biosphere now covers Dublin Bay, reflecting its significant environmental, economic, cultural and tourism importance, and extends to over 300km² to include the bay, the shore and nearby residential areas.

On the Southside at Dun Laoghaire, there is the National Yacht Club, Royal St. George Yacht Club, Royal Irish Yacht Club and Dun Laoghaire Motor Yacht Club as well as Dublin Bay Sailing Club. In the city centre, there is Poolbeg Yacht and Boat Club. On the Northside of Dublin, there is Clontarf Yacht and Boat Club and Sutton Dinghy Club. While not on Dublin Bay, Howth Yacht Club is the major north Dublin Sailing centre.

© Afloat 2020