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Dublin Bay Boating News and Information

Displaying items by tag: property

#dublinport - At Dublin Port freight requiring physical checks after Brexit will, writes The Irish Times, be inspected in a warehouse formerly owned by businessman Harry Crosbie following an agreement signed by the State.

As part of contingency planning for the United Kingdom crashing out of the European Union without a deal next month, Dublin Port Company has signed a licensing agreement with the Office of Public Works to hand over use of a port-owned 13,000m warehouse on a five-acre site at the northeastern part of the port for Brexit-related checks.

The departure of the UK, the State’s closest trading partner, from the EU will lead to a huge increase in the number of UK imports requiring customs, health and safety clearance on their arrival into the port.

Eamonn O’Reilly, the port’s chief executive, confirmed it had licensed the property on Tolka Quay Road to the State, and that the OPW was fitting out the former Crosbie warehouse property and another seven-acre inspection area to be ready for Brexit-related checks after the UK’s departure on March 29th.

For more on this development, click here.

Published in Dublin Port

#Property - A sea view in scenic Greystones is just part of the appeal of Rowan Point at the Wicklow town’s Marina Village development.

The first phase of 58 apartments is now for sale off plans, with views either north to Bray Head, east to the sea or west to the Sugarloaf.

Prices range from €425,000 for first floor units to €950 for penthouses, and unique touches include local stone countertops.

The Irish Times has more on Rowan Point’s first phase HERE.

Published in Waterfront Property

#Property - Galway City Council has granted permission for the construction of new student accommodation on the former Topaz oil site in Galway Docks, as Galway Bay FM reports.

Two blocks of seven and eight storeys each would provide 345 bedrooms as well as space for business start-ups in the plans by Bonham Dock Limited.

However, a number of restrictions have been attached to the project, which constitutes a phase of the masterplan for a ‘New Galway’ between the docks and Ceannt Station rail yards.

Back in September, ambitions plans for floating student accommodation in the city’s cocks were ruled out by the Galway Harbour Company, as previously reported on Afloat.ie.

Published in Galway Harbour
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#Property - New Ross Boat Yard in Co Wexford is now on the market at a price point of €4 million.

With 230 metres of frontage on the River Barrow and easy access to the Nore and Suir (and by extension the South East Coast), the 1.62-hectare property also comes with a sizeable dry dock, one of only three in the Republic that can handle large commercial boats.

Additionally on the site is a 50-tonne marine travel lift and winter storage space or as many as 150 vessels, thanks to signifiant refurbishment over the last decade by its present owner.

With an annual turnover of €840,000, and planning permission in place to adapt the dry dock for year-round service, the boat yard is sure to be an attractive prospect.

CBRE Ireland has more on the property HERE.

Published in Waterfront Property
Tagged under

#Galway - Galway Harbour Company has ruled out any notion of floating student accommodation in the city’s docks.

According to Galway Bay FM, harbour CEO Eamon Bradshaw said lack of space in the inner docks was the reason for rejecting the proposal by a local property management firm in an effort to alleviate the accommodation crisis facing NUI Galway students.

Last month Winters Property said it was in talks to bring to the city two purpose-build apartment barges, with a capacity of more than 400 between them.

The company’s managing director Enda McGuane also said he was discussing the possibility of mooring at the private Mud Dock owned by Capt Sam Field-Corbett, the champion of waterside accommodation behind the Naomh Eanna restoration.

Published in Galway Harbour
Tagged under

#Galway - A property management firm in Galway believes a solution to the city’s rental crisis for students could be found in the form of large-scale floating accommodation, according to The Irish Times.

Winters Property says it could have two such purpose-built apartment barges, with capacity for more than 400 NUI Galway students between them, in Galway Docks within weeks.

The barges are developed by Liverpool-based Bibby Maritime for use in the oil and gas sector and corporate events, and the company currently has two such vessels available.

But planning permission is another matter, with berthing space at a premium in the city and priority given to commercial traffic.

Winters Property’s managing director Enda McGuane says he is in discussions with Capt Sam Field-Corbett, waterside accommodation advocate behind the Naomh Eanna restoration, about the feasibility of using his privately owned Mud Dock as a mooring location.

The Irish Times has much more on the story HERE.

Published in Galway Harbour
Tagged under

#CorkHarbour - More than three acres of Cork docklands are coming to market, as the Irish Examiner reports.

The lands comprise a warehouse property between Monahan Road and Centre Park road east of the city centre, in an area already set for transformation between the revamped Páirc Uí Chaoimh and the new Marina Park regeneration project, adjacent to Cork City Marina by the former showgrounds.

Commercial and residential developers alike are expected to express interest in the 3.31-acre site, zoned for mixed use, and with a guide price of €1.2 million per acre.

Interest in this part of the city is growing with the imminent move of the Port of Cork downriver — and city planners are already meeting with potential buyers for the port’s historic buildings on Custom House Quay.

The Irish Examiner has more on the story HERE.

Published in Cork Harbour

#WaterfrontProperty - The Galway Advertiser has details of a detached family home near Barna with views over Galway Bay on the market for €570,000.

The waterfront house sits on a half-acre site and comes with spacious rooms featuring south-facing windows, designed "to allow free flow" through the home.

Also worth noting is the large attic with potential for conversion, ad the planned gardens between the house and its spectacular vista over the bay.

The Galway Advertiser has more on this property HERE.

Published in Waterfront Property
Tagged under

#Property - A prime seafront site in the South Dublin suburb of Booterstown is on the market for €1 million, as the Irish Independent reports.

Located between the Rock Road and the Dart line and adjacent to the nature reserve, the five-acre site is described by agents Knight Frank as a "unique development opportunity" with "spectacular" views of Dublin Bay.

The lands comprise two areas zoned 'objective Z9' and 'objective F', both of which require preservation of open space and recreational amenity under the respective developments plans of Dublin City and Dun Laoghaire-Rathdown councils.

The Irish Independent has more on the story HERE.

Published in Waterfront Property

#WaterfrontProperty - Aberystwyth Marina and its 150 berths in West Wales are on the market, and the whole lot could be yours for just £2.5 million (€2.9 million), according to Wales Online.

The 23-acre marina, which has planning permission for an extra 40 boat moorings, reportedly has an annual turnover of more than £300,000, and is the first marina in the UK to be available on the open market for more than five years.

Located on the banks of the River Rheidol as it flows into Cardigan Bay, Aberystwyth Marina has the added benefit of being just a day's crossing of the Irish Sea from the East Coast of Ireland and our bustling sailing scene.

But pretenders beware - current owner Merlin Developments is only looking to sell the business to an experienced and proven operator.

Wales Online has much more on the story HERE.

Published in Waterfront Property
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Dublin Bay

Dublin Bay on the east coast of Ireland stretches over seven kilometres, from Howth Head on its northern tip to Dalkey Island in the south. It's a place most Dubliners simply take for granted, and one of the capital's least visited places. But there's more going on out there than you'd imagine.

The biggest boating centre is at Dun Laoghaire Harbour on the Bay's south shore that is home to over 1,500 pleasure craft, four waterfront yacht clubs and Ireland's largest marina.

The bay is rather shallow with many sandbanks and rocky outcrops, and was notorious in the past for shipwrecks, especially when the wind was from the east. Until modern times, many ships and their passengers were lost along the treacherous coastline from Howth to Dun Laoghaire, less than a kilometre from shore.

The Bay is a C-shaped inlet of the Irish Sea and is about 10 kilometres wide along its north-south base, and 7 km in length to its apex at the centre of the city of Dublin; stretching from Howth Head in the north to Dalkey Point in the south. North Bull Island is situated in the northwest part of the bay, where one of two major inshore sandbanks lie, and features a 5 km long sandy beach, Dollymount Strand, fronting an internationally recognised wildfowl reserve. Many of the rivers of Dublin reach the Irish Sea at Dublin Bay: the River Liffey, with the River Dodder flow received less than 1 km inland, River Tolka, and various smaller rivers and streams.

Dublin Bay FAQs

There are approximately ten beaches and bathing spots around Dublin Bay: Dollymount Strand; Forty Foot Bathing Place; Half Moon bathing spot; Merrion Strand; Bull Wall; Sandycove Beach; Sandymount Strand; Seapoint; Shelley Banks; Sutton, Burrow Beach

There are slipways on the north side of Dublin Bay at Clontarf, Sutton and on the southside at Dun Laoghaire Harbour, and in Dalkey at Coliemore and Bulloch Harbours.

Dublin Bay is administered by a number of Government Departments, three local authorities and several statutory agencies. Dublin Port Company is in charge of navigation on the Bay.

Dublin Bay is approximately 70 sq kilometres or 7,000 hectares. The Bay is about 10 kilometres wide along its north-south base, and seven km in length east-west to its peak at the centre of the city of Dublin; stretching from Howth Head in the north to Dalkey Point in the south.

Dun Laoghaire Harbour on the southside of the Bay has an East and West Pier, each one kilometre long; this is one of the largest human-made harbours in the world. There also piers or walls at the entrance to the River Liffey at Dublin city known as the Great North and South Walls. Other harbours on the Bay include Bulloch Harbour and Coliemore Harbours both at Dalkey.

There are two marinas on Dublin Bay. Ireland's largest marina with over 800 berths is on the southern shore at Dun Laoghaire Harbour. The other is at Poolbeg Yacht and Boat Club on the River Liffey close to Dublin City.

Car and passenger Ferries operate from Dublin Port to the UK, Isle of Man and France. A passenger ferry operates from Dun Laoghaire Harbour to Howth as well as providing tourist voyages around the bay.

Dublin Bay has two Islands. Bull Island at Clontarf and Dalkey Island on the southern shore of the Bay.

The River Liffey flows through Dublin city and into the Bay. Its tributaries include the River Dodder, the River Poddle and the River Camac.

Dollymount, Burrow and Seapoint beaches

Approximately 1,500 boats from small dinghies to motorboats to ocean-going yachts. The vast majority, over 1,000, are moored at Dun Laoghaire Harbour which is Ireland's boating capital.

In 1981, UNESCO recognised the importance of Dublin Bay by designating North Bull Island as a Biosphere because of its rare and internationally important habitats and species of wildlife. To support sustainable development, UNESCO’s concept of a Biosphere has evolved to include not just areas of ecological value but also the areas around them and the communities that live and work within these areas. There have since been additional international and national designations, covering much of Dublin Bay, to ensure the protection of its water quality and biodiversity. To fulfil these broader management aims for the ecosystem, the Biosphere was expanded in 2015. The Biosphere now covers Dublin Bay, reflecting its significant environmental, economic, cultural and tourism importance, and extends to over 300km² to include the bay, the shore and nearby residential areas.

On the Southside at Dun Laoghaire, there is the National Yacht Club, Royal St. George Yacht Club, Royal Irish Yacht Club and Dun Laoghaire Motor Yacht Club as well as Dublin Bay Sailing Club. In the city centre, there is Poolbeg Yacht and Boat Club. On the Northside of Dublin, there is Clontarf Yacht and Boat Club and Sutton Dinghy Club. While not on Dublin Bay, Howth Yacht Club is the major north Dublin Sailing centre.

© Afloat 2020