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Dublin Bay Boating News and Information

Displaying items by tag: seals

Feeding harbour seals could land Howth visitors with a fine for thousands of euro, according to a recent letter in The Irish Times.
Milo Kane writes of a new notice placed near the west pier by harbour officials which "threatens a draconian €5,000 fine on any person feeding seals from the pier".
He also claims that local traders and harbour staff he spoke to could give no "commercial or biological reason" for the ban, which he says will ultimately result in fewer visitors to Fingal.
We're keen to hear from anyone who know the reason behind this new sign in
Howth. Leave a comment below if you know the answer.

Feeding harbour seals could land Howth visitors with a fine for thousands of euro, according to a recent letter in The Irish Times.

Milo Kane writes of a new notice placed near the west pier by harbour officials which "threatens a draconian €5,000 fine on any person feeding seals from the pier".

He also claims that local traders and harbour staff he spoke to could give no "commercial or biological reason" for the ban, which he says will ultimately result in fewer visitors to Fingal.

We're keen to hear from anyone who know the reason behind this new sign in Howth. Leave a comment below if you know the answer.

Published in Dublin Bay
Did you say 'recession'? Heir Island Sailing School is reporting a 'boom', according to its latest press release. Between 2009 and 2010 the sail training activity and generated income of this Sailing School situated at Heir (Hare) Island, West Cork, has largely increased in this extremely difficult year for sports and tourism industry.

The Principal John Moore has discounted all prices by 20 to 30%. All 2009 sailors returned in 2010 and brought friends with them. The French network of the newly appointed Director of Sailing Hugues Traonmilin has brought French families to the island and the French sailors were mixed with the Irish and British children and adults with great success. In addition to a busy summer season, 60 students of a South East College came for the very first time to the Sailing School in March 2010 as part of the Transition Year programme. They were hosted with full board accommodation at the Sailing School Guest house.

Definitely the location of the Sailing School plays a big part in this success story. Heir Island is located in the middle of Roaring Water Bay half way between Schull and Baltimore. Whatever direction you sail from the Sailing School beach, you'll encounter wonderful maritime landscapes and crystal clear waters. The Topaz dinghy fleet may sail to 3 or 4 different sandy beaches on one sailing day. The 3 Dublin Bay Mermaids sailing in flotilla explore the surrounding islands of Castle Island, Sherkin Island, the 3 Calves Islands and of course the Carthy's Islands to visit the seals colony.

Such a fantastic location has orientated the programme of this Sailing School towards the "Adventure" courses of the Irish Sailing Association. The school offers Adventure 1 & 2 courses as their "speciality" course.

2011 perspectives are already very encouraging with a second college to be hosted in Spring for a 10 day transition programme meanwhile the first one is returning after excellent feedback of the 2010 students and teachers. Being a family run business makes this small company very flexible and the range of their activities covers young sailors from 8 years old to adults, groups and families, on dinghies or on a traditional Heir Island Lobster Boat, and on kayaks if you don't want to sail. Also as a qualified Yachtmaster Instructor, the director of sailing has facilitated individually tailored sail training for yacht owners aboard their own yacht, an option that has proven both practical and successful.

More information HERE.

Published in Marine Trade
20th January 2011

Erris Seals Back in the Wild

Whitecoat seal pups Snowy and Cecil were finally returned to the wild on Tuesday after their original Saturday release was postponed.
The two seals, who were reabilitated by the Irish Seal Sanctuary at Courtown Harbour after being found on the Erris Peninsula last October, were released from Blacksod Point.
Mayo Today has photos of the successful release HERE.

Whitecoat seal pups Snowy and Cecil were finally returned to the wild on Tuesday after their original Saturday release was postponed.

The two seals, who were reabilitated by the Irish Seal Sanctuary at Courtown Harbour after being found on the Erris Peninsula last October, were successfully released from Blacksod Point.

Mayo Today has photos of the release HERE.

Published in Marine Wildlife
The family of a drowning victim are exploring the idea that seals could be utilised to recover bodies lost in rivers or at sea, The Clare People reports.
Brian Mooney - father of 31-year-old Brecan Mooney, whose body was never recovered after falling into the River Lee in Cork last November - said he had been in contact with the Irish Seal Sanctuary about the potential for seals to be trained to locate bodies in the water.
“We’re looking at the possibility of training seals to find bodies," he told The Clare People at the inquest into his son's death in Cork last week. "It’s never been done before anywhere, but they think there is a real possibility it could be done.”

The family of a drowning victim are exploring the idea that seals could be utilised to recover bodies lost in rivers or at sea, The Clare People reports.

Brian Mooney - father of 31-year-old Brecan Mooney, whose body was never recovered after falling into the River Lee in Cork last November - said he had been in contact with the Irish Seal Sanctuary about the potential for seals to be trained to locate bodies in the water.

“We’re looking at the possibility of training seals to find bodies," he told The Clare People at the inquest into his son's death in Cork last week. "It’s never been done before anywhere, but they think there is a real possibility it could be done.”

Published in Water Safety
28th November 2010

Grey Seal Gets a Big Send Off

Last week saw the Irish Seal Sanctuary celebrate the release of Debbie, the first grey seal to receive care at the group's Courtown Harbour facility.
Photos of the release in Tramore are available HERE at the Irish Seal Sanctuary's website.
The sanctuary also last week welcomed its latest addition, a whitecoat pup named Pinky from the Belmullet Peninsula in Co Mayo.

Last week saw the Irish Seal Sanctuary celebrate the release of Debbie, the first grey seal to receive care at the group's Courtown Harbour facility.

Photos of the release in Tramore are available at the Irish Seal Sanctuary's website HERE.

The sanctuary also last week welcomed its latest addition, a whitecoat pup named Pinky from the Belmullet Peninsula in Co Mayo.

Published in Marine Wildlife
Page 6 of 6

Dublin Bay

Dublin Bay on the east coast of Ireland stretches over seven kilometres, from Howth Head on its northern tip to Dalkey Island in the south. It's a place most Dubliners simply take for granted, and one of the capital's least visited places. But there's more going on out there than you'd imagine.

The biggest boating centre is at Dun Laoghaire Harbour on the Bay's south shore that is home to over 1,500 pleasure craft, four waterfront yacht clubs and Ireland's largest marina.

The bay is rather shallow with many sandbanks and rocky outcrops, and was notorious in the past for shipwrecks, especially when the wind was from the east. Until modern times, many ships and their passengers were lost along the treacherous coastline from Howth to Dun Laoghaire, less than a kilometre from shore.

The Bay is a C-shaped inlet of the Irish Sea and is about 10 kilometres wide along its north-south base, and 7 km in length to its apex at the centre of the city of Dublin; stretching from Howth Head in the north to Dalkey Point in the south. North Bull Island is situated in the northwest part of the bay, where one of two major inshore sandbanks lie, and features a 5 km long sandy beach, Dollymount Strand, fronting an internationally recognised wildfowl reserve. Many of the rivers of Dublin reach the Irish Sea at Dublin Bay: the River Liffey, with the River Dodder flow received less than 1 km inland, River Tolka, and various smaller rivers and streams.

Dublin Bay FAQs

There are approximately ten beaches and bathing spots around Dublin Bay: Dollymount Strand; Forty Foot Bathing Place; Half Moon bathing spot; Merrion Strand; Bull Wall; Sandycove Beach; Sandymount Strand; Seapoint; Shelley Banks; Sutton, Burrow Beach

There are slipways on the north side of Dublin Bay at Clontarf, Sutton and on the southside at Dun Laoghaire Harbour, and in Dalkey at Coliemore and Bulloch Harbours.

Dublin Bay is administered by a number of Government Departments, three local authorities and several statutory agencies. Dublin Port Company is in charge of navigation on the Bay.

Dublin Bay is approximately 70 sq kilometres or 7,000 hectares. The Bay is about 10 kilometres wide along its north-south base, and seven km in length east-west to its peak at the centre of the city of Dublin; stretching from Howth Head in the north to Dalkey Point in the south.

Dun Laoghaire Harbour on the southside of the Bay has an East and West Pier, each one kilometre long; this is one of the largest human-made harbours in the world. There also piers or walls at the entrance to the River Liffey at Dublin city known as the Great North and South Walls. Other harbours on the Bay include Bulloch Harbour and Coliemore Harbours both at Dalkey.

There are two marinas on Dublin Bay. Ireland's largest marina with over 800 berths is on the southern shore at Dun Laoghaire Harbour. The other is at Poolbeg Yacht and Boat Club on the River Liffey close to Dublin City.

Car and passenger Ferries operate from Dublin Port to the UK, Isle of Man and France. A passenger ferry operates from Dun Laoghaire Harbour to Howth as well as providing tourist voyages around the bay.

Dublin Bay has two Islands. Bull Island at Clontarf and Dalkey Island on the southern shore of the Bay.

The River Liffey flows through Dublin city and into the Bay. Its tributaries include the River Dodder, the River Poddle and the River Camac.

Dollymount, Burrow and Seapoint beaches

Approximately 1,500 boats from small dinghies to motorboats to ocean-going yachts. The vast majority, over 1,000, are moored at Dun Laoghaire Harbour which is Ireland's boating capital.

In 1981, UNESCO recognised the importance of Dublin Bay by designating North Bull Island as a Biosphere because of its rare and internationally important habitats and species of wildlife. To support sustainable development, UNESCO’s concept of a Biosphere has evolved to include not just areas of ecological value but also the areas around them and the communities that live and work within these areas. There have since been additional international and national designations, covering much of Dublin Bay, to ensure the protection of its water quality and biodiversity. To fulfil these broader management aims for the ecosystem, the Biosphere was expanded in 2015. The Biosphere now covers Dublin Bay, reflecting its significant environmental, economic, cultural and tourism importance, and extends to over 300km² to include the bay, the shore and nearby residential areas.

On the Southside at Dun Laoghaire, there is the National Yacht Club, Royal St. George Yacht Club, Royal Irish Yacht Club and Dun Laoghaire Motor Yacht Club as well as Dublin Bay Sailing Club. In the city centre, there is Poolbeg Yacht and Boat Club. On the Northside of Dublin, there is Clontarf Yacht and Boat Club and Sutton Dinghy Club. While not on Dublin Bay, Howth Yacht Club is the major north Dublin Sailing centre.

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