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Dublin Bay Boating News and Information

Displaying items by tag: tides

The “power and mystery” of the Earth’s tides is the theme of a new three-part television series involving TG4 and several broadcasters, with Chinese backing writes Lorna Siggins.

Marine Institute scientist MacDara Ó Cuaig is presenting the Irish language version of the series, entitled Taoide, which was filmed across four continents.

The project, involving Chinese production company LIC, was funded by broadcasters TG4, BBC ALBA, BBC Northern Ireland and S4C, and the distribution company Sky Vision.

The consortium describes the three-part series as a “visually stunning exploration” of one of the globe’s most powerful natural forces.

To mark the fact that this year is the International Year of Indigenous Languages, each participating country in the co-production has received its own “bespoke” edit of the documentaries in its own indigenous language.

Television producer/director Donncha Mac Con Iomaire teamed up with Welsh company Cwmni Da to produce the Irish language version for TG4, which Mr Ó Cuaig is presenting.

TG4 says that the collaboration has already inspired the setting up of a new “Celtic Development Fund” to develop similar co-productions.

This series is being distributed in Greater China, Hong Kong, Macau and Taiwan by LIC.

Sky Vision is currently negotiating its sale to other broadcasters worldwide.

Each partner put in around £100,000, according to Cwmni Da managing director Dylan Huws in Wales.

“This means they’re getting a high-end documentary series which has been filmed all over the world,” he said.

“TG4 is delighted to join forces with our broadcasting partners in the other Celtic nations to commission an Irish language version of this ambitious series,” TG4 commissioning editor Proinsias Ní Ghráinne said, adding that the theme has a “particular resonance” for this island.

The first episode of Taoide will be broadcast on TG4 on Wednesday, May 1st, at 9.30pm, with two further episodes on May 8th and 15th.

Published in Maritime TV
Tagged under

#Coastguard - Dun Laoghaire Coast Guard was alerted at 10am yesterday morning (Wednesday 16 May) to respond to a woman and her dog who were cut off by the tide on Merrion Strand, near the seaward side of the Dublin incinerator area.

Dublin Coast Guard’s Marine Rescue Coordination Centre (MRCC) activated a procedure with consent to ping the location of the casualty’s phone to give co-ordinates to the responding emergency services.

Dun Laoghaire RNLI and the Dublin-based Irish Coast Guard helicopter Rescue 116 responded to the area and were directed in by the Dun Laoghaire coastguard team.

Rescue 116 proceeded to land on the sand bank while Dun Laoghaire RNLI’s inshore lifeboat stood by to assist. A Dublin Fire Brigade RIB from Dublin Port also responded.

The casualty and her dog were airlifted from the sand bank to awaiting coastguard personal on the beach. After checks by Dublin Fire Brigade paramedics, they were taken back from the beach to land.

Dun Laoghaire Coast Guard noted yesterday’s “very fast” spring tide which caught this dog walker unawares. Tide times for Dublin can be found online HERE.

#Tides - Irish Sailing has published the latest tide times for 2018 and 2019 for mariners in Dublin Bay (North Wall), Galway, Belfast and Cork Harbour (Cobh).

All times and related tidal variations (adjusted for Irish Summer Time) are estimates and none are verified by any national hydrographic office, so are to be referred to as a guideline only.

Published in ISA
Tagged under

#Kinsale - Harbour users in Kinsale can now check tide times online thanks to a new Twitter account.

Kindle Tides (@KinsaleTides) does exactly what the name suggests, tweeting daily with the latest tide information for the Co Cork harbour in an easy-to-use format.

Published in Kinsale
Tagged under

As the UK Bank holiday approaches the UK coastguard has issed a warning to check tides and stay safe. With the school holidays well underway and the busy bank holiday weekend around the corner, coastguards and the Shipping Minister are coming together to remind families, children and visitors of the importance of checking weather and tide times to stay safe whilst at the beach and along the coast.

Already this summer coastguards have dealt with many beach-related incidents, with a particularly high number of people being caught out by the tide and needing to be rescued after becoming stranded.  Since 1st July, almost 150 such rescues have been carried out around the UK coast, with around 80% involving children.

This latest advice is part of an ongoing programme by the Maritime and Coastguard Agency to remind those who visit our coast to have a great time and remain safe. So before you go check out the weather, sea conditions and the tide times (you can find this information on the web or many beaches display it at their entrance).  That way you can enjoy the sea safely.

In addition to checking the tide times, remember that inflatable boats and toys can be great fun, but they are more suitable for use in swimming pools than at the beach.  If you do use one at the beach, make sure that it is tethered to an adult who is in the sea with you and never use it if there is an offshore wind.  Inflatable boats and toys can easily be blown off shore, then overturn. If you are blown out to sea on an inflatable boat or toy wave your arms in the air and shout for help. If you are out of your depth, don't attempt to swim back to shore.

Be careful around cliffs and rocks – they can be slippery and crumbly. Don't climb them unless you are properly kitted out. And don't attempt to rescue people or dogs from cliffs – call 999 and ask for the coastguard.

Coastguards are also encouraging parents, grandparents and other adults to ensure that children are properly supervised on the coast. We deal with numerous cases of lost children every year and it can be very distressing for children and adults alike. Some beaches provide beach band schemes which help to re-unite children with their families if they become separated, so take advantage of these schemes if appropriate.

Try to go to a lifeguarded beach if you can and stay within the flagged area.

If you notice that someone is in difficulty, either alert the lifeguard if one is available or call the Coastguard on 999.

Shipping Minister Mike Penning said:

"As an island nation, enjoying a seaside holiday is a great British tradition.  The UK has some of the finest coastline in the world, and I want everyone to be able to enjoy it safely.  Already this year we have seen how something as simple as familiarising yourself with the tide times before you set out can make all the difference.  That is why I am encouraging anyone thinking of heading for the coast to take a few sensible precautions so they return home safely and with fond memories of a great day out.    I would also like to pay tribute to our coastguard staff and volunteers who do such a great job to keep those who use our coastline as safe as possible."

Published in Marine Warning
Tagged under
Irish Water Safety is today warning the public of the increased risk to people becoming stranded whilst walking or picking shellfish on our beaches over the weekend.

The moon will be at its closest to earth since 1993 on Saturday March 19th.
This "Lunar Perigee", or 'Super Moon' as some astrologers refer to it as, is the opposite of the "Lunar Apogee", when the Moon is furthest from Earth. Generally, the Moon looks about 12-14% larger at its perigee compared to its apogee.

This has the effect of causing very high and low tides, or increasing the range of the tide. This will expose large areas of beach and rocks which we normally don't see. Many people enjoy walking on our beaches and exploring these new areas of beach and in particular people enjoy picking shellfish to eat which become exposed during these very low tides.

The risk to the public will be of becoming stranded as the tide advances back in which can leave people in a position where they are cut off from the shore. Members of the public are cautioned to be aware of this risk and carry your mobile phone. Should you get in to trouble then call 112 or 999 and ask for Marine Rescue, giving your exact location and in particular if you are near to any conspicuous landmarks nearby to assist the Rescue Services in locating your whereabouts.

All seafarers, surfers, swimmers and divers should be aware of the increased tidal streams that will be running around our coast over the weekend; people could find themselves in peril as a result of these strong and fast tidal conditions which have not been experienced for some time now.

Published in Marine Warning

At 5.30 pm last night Liverpool Coastguard were alerted to a local 15 year old girl in difficulty by the Leasowe Lighthouse on Moreton Common, Wirral, on Merseyside on the far side of the Irish Sea . She was completely cut off by the tide about 100 metres out on the nearby sandbank.

The Hoylake Coastguard Rescue Team were alerted as was the RNLI New Brighton hovercraft and West Kirby inshore lifeboat.

In the meantime the local Coastguard Sector Manager Steve Travis along with his team deployed their mud sled and recovered the girl to dry land.

By 6.30 pm this evening the girl was safely back at home with her mum.

Paul Kirby, Duty Watch Manager at Liverpool Coastguard said

"Our thanks are due to Steve and his team and the RNLI crews from Hoylake and West Kirby for responding so promptly to our call.

As the evenings are now darker after the clocks went back, swift tides and sandbanks can present a major problem for the unwary in the darkness. Please take care when going anywhere near tidal waters and make sure you know the times of the tides."

Published in Coastguard

Dublin Bay

Dublin Bay on the east coast of Ireland stretches over seven kilometres, from Howth Head on its northern tip to Dalkey Island in the south. It's a place most Dubliners simply take for granted, and one of the capital's least visited places. But there's more going on out there than you'd imagine.

The biggest boating centre is at Dun Laoghaire Harbour on the Bay's south shore that is home to over 1,500 pleasure craft, four waterfront yacht clubs and Ireland's largest marina.

The bay is rather shallow with many sandbanks and rocky outcrops, and was notorious in the past for shipwrecks, especially when the wind was from the east. Until modern times, many ships and their passengers were lost along the treacherous coastline from Howth to Dun Laoghaire, less than a kilometre from shore.

The Bay is a C-shaped inlet of the Irish Sea and is about 10 kilometres wide along its north-south base, and 7 km in length to its apex at the centre of the city of Dublin; stretching from Howth Head in the north to Dalkey Point in the south. North Bull Island is situated in the northwest part of the bay, where one of two major inshore sandbanks lie, and features a 5 km long sandy beach, Dollymount Strand, fronting an internationally recognised wildfowl reserve. Many of the rivers of Dublin reach the Irish Sea at Dublin Bay: the River Liffey, with the River Dodder flow received less than 1 km inland, River Tolka, and various smaller rivers and streams.

Dublin Bay FAQs

There are approximately ten beaches and bathing spots around Dublin Bay: Dollymount Strand; Forty Foot Bathing Place; Half Moon bathing spot; Merrion Strand; Bull Wall; Sandycove Beach; Sandymount Strand; Seapoint; Shelley Banks; Sutton, Burrow Beach

There are slipways on the north side of Dublin Bay at Clontarf, Sutton and on the southside at Dun Laoghaire Harbour, and in Dalkey at Coliemore and Bulloch Harbours.

Dublin Bay is administered by a number of Government Departments, three local authorities and several statutory agencies. Dublin Port Company is in charge of navigation on the Bay.

Dublin Bay is approximately 70 sq kilometres or 7,000 hectares. The Bay is about 10 kilometres wide along its north-south base, and seven km in length east-west to its peak at the centre of the city of Dublin; stretching from Howth Head in the north to Dalkey Point in the south.

Dun Laoghaire Harbour on the southside of the Bay has an East and West Pier, each one kilometre long; this is one of the largest human-made harbours in the world. There also piers or walls at the entrance to the River Liffey at Dublin city known as the Great North and South Walls. Other harbours on the Bay include Bulloch Harbour and Coliemore Harbours both at Dalkey.

There are two marinas on Dublin Bay. Ireland's largest marina with over 800 berths is on the southern shore at Dun Laoghaire Harbour. The other is at Poolbeg Yacht and Boat Club on the River Liffey close to Dublin City.

Car and passenger Ferries operate from Dublin Port to the UK, Isle of Man and France. A passenger ferry operates from Dun Laoghaire Harbour to Howth as well as providing tourist voyages around the bay.

Dublin Bay has two Islands. Bull Island at Clontarf and Dalkey Island on the southern shore of the Bay.

The River Liffey flows through Dublin city and into the Bay. Its tributaries include the River Dodder, the River Poddle and the River Camac.

Dollymount, Burrow and Seapoint beaches

Approximately 1,500 boats from small dinghies to motorboats to ocean-going yachts. The vast majority, over 1,000, are moored at Dun Laoghaire Harbour which is Ireland's boating capital.

In 1981, UNESCO recognised the importance of Dublin Bay by designating North Bull Island as a Biosphere because of its rare and internationally important habitats and species of wildlife. To support sustainable development, UNESCO’s concept of a Biosphere has evolved to include not just areas of ecological value but also the areas around them and the communities that live and work within these areas. There have since been additional international and national designations, covering much of Dublin Bay, to ensure the protection of its water quality and biodiversity. To fulfil these broader management aims for the ecosystem, the Biosphere was expanded in 2015. The Biosphere now covers Dublin Bay, reflecting its significant environmental, economic, cultural and tourism importance, and extends to over 300km² to include the bay, the shore and nearby residential areas.

On the Southside at Dun Laoghaire, there is the National Yacht Club, Royal St. George Yacht Club, Royal Irish Yacht Club and Dun Laoghaire Motor Yacht Club as well as Dublin Bay Sailing Club. In the city centre, there is Poolbeg Yacht and Boat Club. On the Northside of Dublin, there is Clontarf Yacht and Boat Club and Sutton Dinghy Club. While not on Dublin Bay, Howth Yacht Club is the major north Dublin Sailing centre.

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