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Dublin Bay Boating News and Information

Dublin Bay Sailing and Boating News
The Subaru-sponsored Flying Fifteen World Championships sets sail on Dublin Bay this September
The National Yacht Club has issued a call for volunteers to assist in its hosting of the Flying Fifteen World Championships from 1-13 September. As many as 86 boats expected to enter the event, which will take place 50 years…
Martin Byrne, his mother Hilda and his wife Triona with their classic new Water Wag Hilda, No 49 in a fleet whose origins can be traced back to 1887.
Martin Byrne, noted International Dragon sailor and former Commodore of the Royal St George YC in Dun Laoghaire, has happy memories of family sailing going back more than fifty years, when his parents decided that it was a sport which…
A ten boat fleet contested the J109 Easterns on Dublin Bay
After a mix of coastal and inshore races, Tim and Richard Goodbody's White Mischief of the Royal Irish lived up to her pre-championship billing as favourite and won the J109 Eastern title but only after a tie-break on Dublin Bay this afternoon. …
Bottlenose dolphin playing with a paddleboarder in front of Dalkey Island
Dun Laoghaire-Rathdown County Council is currently carrying out a visitor survey for Dalkey Island to assist in the long-term management and protection of a key historical and ecological site in Dublin Bay. Dalkey Island, which is owned by the council,…
At close quarters: Gone is the grey hull colour of former owner's Flinter Group whose cargsoship is now Arklow Dusk. The Irish flagged ship had made its first call to Dublin Port and was one of seven ships that presented a busy scene in Dublin Bay over the May Bank Holiday weekend.
#dublinbay- It was a busy scene in Dublin Bay during the May Bank Holiday as up to seven ships were at anchorage among them an Irish flagged cargo which stood out with its distinctive green painted hull, writes Jehan Ashmore.…
Red Bull Cliff Divers To Wow Crowds In Dun Laoghaire Next Month
“Unforeseen circumstances” have prompted the move of Dublin’s leg of the 2019 Red Bull Cliff Diving World Series from Grand Canal Dock to Dun Laoghaire Harbour. But Dublin city centre’ loss is Dun Laoghaire’s gain — even more so now…
Jedi, the highly competitive J109
#dublinbay - An illustrated lecture: “Man Overboard Recovery-Volvo Round Ireland 2018" is to be presented next week in Dublin by John White and Kenneth Rumball. This final lecture in the present series, organised by Friends of Glenua is to be…
The partially completed new jetty at the Dun Laoghaire Baths site photographed this week at low tide. When finished DLR says the pier will permit swimmers to enter deep water clear of the rocks at low tide
Progress on the redevelopment of the Dun Laoghaire Baths site on Dublin Bay continues apace with part of the newly-built pier and jetty now clearly visible in the Scotsman's Bay area at the back of the East Pier. When finished…
The new RS21 keelboat is prepared for launching on Belfast Lough on Sunday
Sunday saw the first time that the brand new RS21 keelboat hit the water in Ireland with opportunities this month to get sailing on this exciting design. The Northern Ireland RS agent - Bosun Bob's brought the asymmetric keelboat over…
#dublinbay - As part of the Bullock Harbour Bicentenary lecture series to mark and celebrate the construction of the small scenic south Dublin Bay harbour in Dalkey, a panel discussion will focus on the Bay itself.  The Bullock Harbour Preservation…
A Class One start at the 2017 Dun Laoghaire Regatta on Dublin Bay
With three months to go to the first gun off Dun Laoghaire’s famous harbour, 410 boats are already entered — and more than half the entries are visiting craft to Volvo Dun Laoghaire Regatta 2019. It is an early-season marine…
 Busy Frostbite mark rounding at the DMYC Frostbites
Is it still the Annalise effect, now morphing perhaps into the Finn Lynch effect? Is it the Laser Master Worlds effect from last September on Dublin Bay writes Sean Craig? Is it the emergence of the Radial rig as what…
#lectures - ‘North Sea Odyssey –3,600nm in a Shipman 28’ by Christine Heath is the title of the next Friends of Glenua presentation to be held in Dublin in aid of the RNLI. The Presentation on Thursday 4 April at 8pm will…
The 330m Royal Princess  cruise ship arrives in Dublin in 2018 carrying more than 3,000 passengers and crew
Dublin Town, the not for profit organisation charged with creating a welcoming and economically viable city environment in Dublin, has urged Dublin Port to reconsider its decision to cut cruise ship calls to the city by more than 50%, from…
#lectures - As part of the Bullock Harbour Bicentenary celebrations, the next lecture is to be held on Tuesday (12 March) in the Dalkey Castle and Heritage Centre. The free lecture programme which began last year has been organised by…
A Greenland Polar Bear in the Nansen Fjord, one of the stunning photos to feature in a presentation held this Thursday, 7 March (8pm) in the Poolbeg Y&BC in Dublin. For more details, see below.
#lecture - Friends of Glenua will next hold a presentation: Polar Bears of Greenland’s ‘Forbidden Coast’ which is a story illustrated with stunning photos and videos from this fascinating region. The speaker Adrian van der Lee who is a photojournalist, graphic designer…

Dublin Bay

Dublin Bay on the east coast of Ireland stretches over seven kilometres, from Howth Head on its northern tip to Dalkey Island in the south. It's a place most Dubliners simply take for granted, and one of the capital's least visited places. But there's more going on out there than you'd imagine.

The biggest boating centre is at Dun Laoghaire Harbour on the Bay's south shore that is home to over 1,500 pleasure craft, four waterfront yacht clubs and Ireland's largest marina.

The bay is rather shallow with many sandbanks and rocky outcrops, and was notorious in the past for shipwrecks, especially when the wind was from the east. Until modern times, many ships and their passengers were lost along the treacherous coastline from Howth to Dun Laoghaire, less than a kilometre from shore.

The Bay is a C-shaped inlet of the Irish Sea and is about 10 kilometres wide along its north-south base, and 7 km in length to its apex at the centre of the city of Dublin; stretching from Howth Head in the north to Dalkey Point in the south. North Bull Island is situated in the northwest part of the bay, where one of two major inshore sandbanks lie, and features a 5 km long sandy beach, Dollymount Strand, fronting an internationally recognised wildfowl reserve. Many of the rivers of Dublin reach the Irish Sea at Dublin Bay: the River Liffey, with the River Dodder flow received less than 1 km inland, River Tolka, and various smaller rivers and streams.

Dublin Bay FAQs

There are approximately ten beaches and bathing spots around Dublin Bay: Dollymount Strand; Forty Foot Bathing Place; Half Moon bathing spot; Merrion Strand; Bull Wall; Sandycove Beach; Sandymount Strand; Seapoint; Shelley Banks; Sutton, Burrow Beach

There are slipways on the north side of Dublin Bay at Clontarf, Sutton and on the southside at Dun Laoghaire Harbour, and in Dalkey at Coliemore and Bulloch Harbours.

Dublin Bay is administered by a number of Government Departments, three local authorities and several statutory agencies. Dublin Port Company is in charge of navigation on the Bay.

Dublin Bay is approximately 70 sq kilometres or 7,000 hectares. The Bay is about 10 kilometres wide along its north-south base, and seven km in length east-west to its peak at the centre of the city of Dublin; stretching from Howth Head in the north to Dalkey Point in the south.

Dun Laoghaire Harbour on the southside of the Bay has an East and West Pier, each one kilometre long; this is one of the largest human-made harbours in the world. There also piers or walls at the entrance to the River Liffey at Dublin city known as the Great North and South Walls. Other harbours on the Bay include Bulloch Harbour and Coliemore Harbours both at Dalkey.

There are two marinas on Dublin Bay. Ireland's largest marina with over 800 berths is on the southern shore at Dun Laoghaire Harbour. The other is at Poolbeg Yacht and Boat Club on the River Liffey close to Dublin City.

Car and passenger Ferries operate from Dublin Port to the UK, Isle of Man and France. A passenger ferry operates from Dun Laoghaire Harbour to Howth as well as providing tourist voyages around the bay.

Dublin Bay has two Islands. Bull Island at Clontarf and Dalkey Island on the southern shore of the Bay.

The River Liffey flows through Dublin city and into the Bay. Its tributaries include the River Dodder, the River Poddle and the River Camac.

Dollymount, Burrow and Seapoint beaches

Approximately 1,500 boats from small dinghies to motorboats to ocean-going yachts. The vast majority, over 1,000, are moored at Dun Laoghaire Harbour which is Ireland's boating capital.

In 1981, UNESCO recognised the importance of Dublin Bay by designating North Bull Island as a Biosphere because of its rare and internationally important habitats and species of wildlife. To support sustainable development, UNESCO’s concept of a Biosphere has evolved to include not just areas of ecological value but also the areas around them and the communities that live and work within these areas. There have since been additional international and national designations, covering much of Dublin Bay, to ensure the protection of its water quality and biodiversity. To fulfil these broader management aims for the ecosystem, the Biosphere was expanded in 2015. The Biosphere now covers Dublin Bay, reflecting its significant environmental, economic, cultural and tourism importance, and extends to over 300km² to include the bay, the shore and nearby residential areas.

On the Southside at Dun Laoghaire, there is the National Yacht Club, Royal St. George Yacht Club, Royal Irish Yacht Club and Dun Laoghaire Motor Yacht Club as well as Dublin Bay Sailing Club. In the city centre, there is Poolbeg Yacht and Boat Club. On the Northside of Dublin, there is Clontarf Yacht and Boat Club and Sutton Dinghy Club. While not on Dublin Bay, Howth Yacht Club is the major north Dublin Sailing centre.

© Afloat 2020

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