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Dublin Bay Boating News and Information

Dublin Bay Sailing and Boating News
#DublinBay - Two bulk-carriers currently anchored off Bulloch Harbour in Dublin Bay, one from South America, the other from mainland Europe, both await docking in the capital's port, but exactly at the same basin berth, writes Jehan Ashmore. The larger…
Safety Advisory For Swimmers Over Plastic Pollution At Forty Foot
#Safety - Dun Laoghaire-Rathdown County Council has posted a safety advisory for swimmers in Dun Laoghaire over an incident of plastic pollution between the West Pier and the Forty Foot. According to the local authority, “small strips of plastic” that…
The Sellafield plant in Cumbria
BBC News reports that The UK government must "get a grip" on spiralling costs and project delays that have plagued the Sellafield nuclear site, located on the far side of the Irish Sea on the Cumbrian coast, approximately 170 km (112…
Flossie Donnelly presenting Dun Laoghaire Harbour with Ireland’s first Seabin this past summer
#Seabin - Five months after local coastal litter campaigner Flossie Donnelly saw the installation of Dun Laoghaire Harbour’s first Seabin, the enterprising youth has presented the National Yacht Club with its own water-cleaning device. According to the Dun Laoghaire waterfront…
RMS Leinster: A waterfront walk of remembrance through the harbour town of Dun Laoghaire took place yesterday on the centenary anniversary of the WWI disaster. There was a great turnout for the special day where Afloat adds the procession passed close to the RMS Leinster (anchor) memorial opposite Carlisle Pier, from where the steamer departed but would never return.  Note appropriately those dressed to represent 'RMS' passengers walk ahead of officials prior to arriving at the state ceremony held beside the dlr Lexicon Library.
#rmsLeinster - The First Minister of Wales along with Irish dignitaries, ambassadors among them from the UK and Germany attended in Dun Laoghaire yesterday a state commemoration ceremony on the centenary of the sinking of RMS Leinster, writes Jehan Ashmore.…
On the centenary anniversary of the sinking of RMS Leinster, relatives from the disaster carried out wreath-laying ceremony at the wreck site off the Kish Bank this morning. AFLOAT adds the relatives where on board excursion vessel St. Bridget having departed Dun Laoghaire Harbour and escorted by LE Orla and local RNLI lifeboat Anna Livia. This afternoon a second boat trip will bring more relatives to the scene of the single-worst maritime tragedy on the Irish Sea.
#rmsLeinster - Today, relatives of those who were on RMS Leinster when it was sunk by a German submarine 100 years ago (during WWI) have visited the site of the sinking. The mail boat writes The Irish Times was torpedoed…
RMS Leinster - tomorrow marks the 100th anniversary of the sinking of the Royal Mail Steamer (RMS) during WWI on 10 October 1918 where the disaster lead to more than 500 lives lost. As part of commemorative events, a ferry the Stena Superfast X is to pay a salute off the Kish Bank during a routine crossing from Holyhead, Wales to Dublin Port.
#rmsLeinster - Originally a Stena Line ferry sailing from Holyhead, Wales was to make a diversion in Dublin Bay involving a sail-past off Dun Laoghaire Harbour to mark tomorrow's centenary anniversary of the sinking of RMS Leinster, writes Jehan Ashmore.…
A landward view of the the works at Dun Laoghaire baths site. The marine project aims to breathe new life into the seafront and provides a new pier for boaters
Work continues apace for new boating facilities on Dublin Bay at the old Dun Laoghaire Baths site in Sandycove. Over the next couple of months, the final elements of the pier construction will be installed, including caisson units (which look like large…
#rmsLeinster - As part of RMS Leinster commemorative events, the UK's Royal Mail Group appropriately is the main sponsor of a special centenary concert tomorrow, Sunday 7th October (7.30pm) at Christ Church, Park Road, Dún Laoghaire in Co. Dublin.   Performances…
#DublinBay - A containership on a voyage from Liverpool, UK when bound for New York, USA, was forced to turn around off the Wexford coast and divert to Dublin Bay on Tuesday, has finally departed this morning, writes Jehan Ashmore.…
Captain Bligh (1754-1817) in 1800, eleven years after Mutiny on the Bounty, completed a survey of Dublin Bay in three months.
#Lectures - Friends of Glenua next week launch their 2018/19 winter lectures season, in aid of the RNLI, on Thursday 4 October at 8pm in the Poolbeg Yacht and Boat Club, Pigeon House Rd, Ringsend in Dublin. Opening the season's first lecture…
RMS Leinster: Centenary events to mark the tragedy of the Irish Sea 'mail-boat' in 1918 (continue next month) notably on 10 October, when 100 years ago the ship was sunk by a German U-Boat with a major loss of life.
#RMSLeinster - Centenary events to mark the tragic sinking of RMS Leinster in the Irish Sea during WW1, continue into next month in Dun Laoghaire, notably on 10 October, the day the 'mail-boat' 100 years ago was struck by a…
Mona (Denis Aylmer) and Tir na nOg (Sean Walsh) racing in the inaugural event for the DBOGA’s Leinster Plate in 2013. This Sunday’s planned staging at Dun Laoghaire of the Leinster Plate Race 2018 may be affected by the inclement weather, and a decision will be taken on Saturday morning
This year's Centenary of the wartime sinking of the mailboat RMS Leinster on 10th October 1918 will see a significant Dun Laoghaire and national commemoration on the day itself writes W M Nixon. As part of the buildup to those…
Work at Dun Laoghaire baths site continues on Dublin Bay. Architects say it will not only provide a connection between the People's Park (immediately behind the building above), but will also link the town of Dún Laoghaire with its seafront. Overall, the project aims to breathe new life into the seafront
Marine works continue at the new Dún Laoghaire Baths site, where the old baths buildings have now either been completely demolished or retained for the next stage of the project that will ultimately see a new public café linked to an outdoor terrace with views over the…
The Training Ship Jack Petchey in Dun Laoghaire with a class of Sea Cadets on the bow
The UK youth charity Training Ship Jack Petchey is alongside in Dun Laoghaire Marina this weekend on Dublin Bay. The  British-flagged training ship is named after Jack Petchey OBE. The Jack Petchey is part of the Offshore Fleet of the…
CY&BC members on the water at Clontarf
Clontarf Yacht and Boat Club will host its fourth annual Sail Against Suicide event on Saturday 25 August from 10am to 4pm. Sail Against Suicide event is an initiative from Jessica Clohisey, one of the junior members of the club…

Dublin Bay

Dublin Bay on the east coast of Ireland stretches over seven kilometres, from Howth Head on its northern tip to Dalkey Island in the south. It's a place most Dubliners simply take for granted, and one of the capital's least visited places. But there's more going on out there than you'd imagine.

The biggest boating centre is at Dun Laoghaire Harbour on the Bay's south shore that is home to over 1,500 pleasure craft, four waterfront yacht clubs and Ireland's largest marina.

The bay is rather shallow with many sandbanks and rocky outcrops, and was notorious in the past for shipwrecks, especially when the wind was from the east. Until modern times, many ships and their passengers were lost along the treacherous coastline from Howth to Dun Laoghaire, less than a kilometre from shore.

The Bay is a C-shaped inlet of the Irish Sea and is about 10 kilometres wide along its north-south base, and 7 km in length to its apex at the centre of the city of Dublin; stretching from Howth Head in the north to Dalkey Point in the south. North Bull Island is situated in the northwest part of the bay, where one of two major inshore sandbanks lie, and features a 5 km long sandy beach, Dollymount Strand, fronting an internationally recognised wildfowl reserve. Many of the rivers of Dublin reach the Irish Sea at Dublin Bay: the River Liffey, with the River Dodder flow received less than 1 km inland, River Tolka, and various smaller rivers and streams.

Dublin Bay FAQs

There are approximately ten beaches and bathing spots around Dublin Bay: Dollymount Strand; Forty Foot Bathing Place; Half Moon bathing spot; Merrion Strand; Bull Wall; Sandycove Beach; Sandymount Strand; Seapoint; Shelley Banks; Sutton, Burrow Beach

There are slipways on the north side of Dublin Bay at Clontarf, Sutton and on the southside at Dun Laoghaire Harbour, and in Dalkey at Coliemore and Bulloch Harbours.

Dublin Bay is administered by a number of Government Departments, three local authorities and several statutory agencies. Dublin Port Company is in charge of navigation on the Bay.

Dublin Bay is approximately 70 sq kilometres or 7,000 hectares. The Bay is about 10 kilometres wide along its north-south base, and seven km in length east-west to its peak at the centre of the city of Dublin; stretching from Howth Head in the north to Dalkey Point in the south.

Dun Laoghaire Harbour on the southside of the Bay has an East and West Pier, each one kilometre long; this is one of the largest human-made harbours in the world. There also piers or walls at the entrance to the River Liffey at Dublin city known as the Great North and South Walls. Other harbours on the Bay include Bulloch Harbour and Coliemore Harbours both at Dalkey.

There are two marinas on Dublin Bay. Ireland's largest marina with over 800 berths is on the southern shore at Dun Laoghaire Harbour. The other is at Poolbeg Yacht and Boat Club on the River Liffey close to Dublin City.

Car and passenger Ferries operate from Dublin Port to the UK, Isle of Man and France. A passenger ferry operates from Dun Laoghaire Harbour to Howth as well as providing tourist voyages around the bay.

Dublin Bay has two Islands. Bull Island at Clontarf and Dalkey Island on the southern shore of the Bay.

The River Liffey flows through Dublin city and into the Bay. Its tributaries include the River Dodder, the River Poddle and the River Camac.

Dollymount, Burrow and Seapoint beaches

Approximately 1,500 boats from small dinghies to motorboats to ocean-going yachts. The vast majority, over 1,000, are moored at Dun Laoghaire Harbour which is Ireland's boating capital.

In 1981, UNESCO recognised the importance of Dublin Bay by designating North Bull Island as a Biosphere because of its rare and internationally important habitats and species of wildlife. To support sustainable development, UNESCO’s concept of a Biosphere has evolved to include not just areas of ecological value but also the areas around them and the communities that live and work within these areas. There have since been additional international and national designations, covering much of Dublin Bay, to ensure the protection of its water quality and biodiversity. To fulfil these broader management aims for the ecosystem, the Biosphere was expanded in 2015. The Biosphere now covers Dublin Bay, reflecting its significant environmental, economic, cultural and tourism importance, and extends to over 300km² to include the bay, the shore and nearby residential areas.

On the Southside at Dun Laoghaire, there is the National Yacht Club, Royal St. George Yacht Club, Royal Irish Yacht Club and Dun Laoghaire Motor Yacht Club as well as Dublin Bay Sailing Club. In the city centre, there is Poolbeg Yacht and Boat Club. On the Northside of Dublin, there is Clontarf Yacht and Boat Club and Sutton Dinghy Club. While not on Dublin Bay, Howth Yacht Club is the major north Dublin Sailing centre.

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