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Dublin Bay Boating News and Information

Dublin Bay Sailing and Boating News
Public Consultation On Dun Laoghaire Baths Opens Today
#DunLaoghaire - The public consultation on the proposed redevelopment of the old Victorian baths in Dun Laoghaire opened today (Monday 20 April). As previously reported on Afloat.ie, last month the €2.5 million project was given the green light by the…
#lift–in – A Time-lapse video by Declan Tonge of the morning's lift-in at the National Yacht Club (NYC) Dun Laoghaire last weekend, squashing 3.5 hours into just under 3 mins. A mobile crane comes to the club at the start of…
New Yacht Sees 'Sailing in Dublin' Club on Crest of a Wave
#sid – Sailing in Dublin Club (SID Club) has just acquired an additional cruising boat to add to its growing fleet writes Jessica O'Donnell. Silver Wind, a 35ft Sun Odyssey boat, was purchased thanks to the assistance of a grant…
Final Stena HSS Sailing 'Scene' to Reflect on Proposed Cruise Plans
#HSStoCruiseScene - Had Stena Line retained running HSS Stena Explorer this year on the Dun Laoghaire-Holyhead route, this would have been her 20th year and with sailings scheduled to have begun last week, writes Jehan Ashmore. However, the final chapter…
Green Light For Development Of Dun Laoghaire's Victorian Baths
#DunLaoghaire - Dun Laoghaire's Victorian baths will finally get a new lease of life – but not for swimming, as The Irish Times reports. Revised plans for the revival of the Royal Victoria baths just east of the main harbour…
Olympic Race Officer To Explain How To Run Yacht Races
#yachtracecourse – Olympic Race Officer Jack Roy is giving a course this Wednesday in the Royal Irish Yacht Club, Dun Laoghaire for all those who want to run races or help on committee boats in any capacity. The course is…
INSS March Downwind For 1720 Class Win At DBSC Spring Chicken
#inss – After two weeks of missing racing, there were joyous sailors all over Dun Laogahire yesterday, despite a few 1720s braving it to go out last week only for the race to be wisely abandoned, everybody was very keen…
Lord Mayor Steps Out on Charity 'Harbour2Harbour' Walk Around Dublin Bay
#dublinbaynews – Lord Mayor of Dublin Christy Burke today called on walkers of all ages to register for the tenth annual Harbour2Harbour Walk in aid of Aware. The walk, which takes place on St. Patrick's Day, Tuesday 17th March 2015…
Glen Sailing on Dublin Bay Video
#glen – This video, shot and edited by Ki Duong on board Glenshane of the Dun Laoghaire Glen fleet celebrates the 2014 season. The Glens have been sailing and racing on Dublin Bay now for 50 years and continue to thrive. As you can see…
Strong Winds Cancel Dublin Bay Spring Chicken & DMYC Frostbite Series
#dbsc – Although Kinsale's natural harbour may have provided the necessary protection for the penultimate round of the south coast town's Frostbite series yesterday, there was no such shelter from the winds on the east coast with both of Sunday's…
Dun Laoghaire Dinghies Join INSS Sailors To Enjoy Challenging Conditions
#dbsc – At five minutes past one, the INSS Sailors competing in the DMYC Frostbites as part of the INSS Race Training Programme, were rigging their boats on the Coal Harbour Slipway, raring to go in a big breeze writes…
LexIcon Library: Soundings - Collective Memories of the Sea
#LexIconExhibition – Soundings: Collective Memories of the Sea is the inaugural exhibition programme currently held in the new Dun Laoghaire-Rathdown County Council Library headquarters – the dlr LexIcon. Soundings which is exhibited in the Lexicon's Municipal Gallery, explores the relationships between…
DMYC Frostbite Dinghy Racing Cancelled Again Due to Strong Winds
#dmycfrostbites – With both XCWeather and Windfinder forecasts suggesting similar conditions for 15:00, northerly winds of 20 knots with gust to 27/28 knots, air temperatures of 5/6˚, but, ironically sunny conditions, the organisers of today's DMYC Frostbites pulled the plug…
DMYC Dinghy Frostbites Cancelled Again Due to Strong Winds on Dublin Bay
#dmyc – Due to an adverse forecast and being the Sunday that it is, the last before Christmas, today's DMYC dinghy sailing Frostbite racing was cancelled yesterday evening. It is the third such cancellation in a row for the popular…
INSS Stage Mini Frostbite Series After DMYC Cancellation
#frostbites – After the baptism of fire from the morning's DBSC Turkey Shoot racing series, it was never a sure thing that the DMYC Frostbite Series would go ahead writes Kenneth Rumball. As predicted at approximately 12:15 the code flags…
DMYC Frostbiters Suffer Second Cancellation
#frostbites – For the second Sunday in succession DMYC frostbites was cancelled due to strong winds.  N over A is flying from the DMYC flagpole (at 12:32) with a confirming Facebook post that Frostbite racing is cancelled again - too…

Dublin Bay

Dublin Bay on the east coast of Ireland stretches over seven kilometres, from Howth Head on its northern tip to Dalkey Island in the south. It's a place most Dubliners simply take for granted, and one of the capital's least visited places. But there's more going on out there than you'd imagine.

The biggest boating centre is at Dun Laoghaire Harbour on the Bay's south shore that is home to over 1,500 pleasure craft, four waterfront yacht clubs and Ireland's largest marina.

The bay is rather shallow with many sandbanks and rocky outcrops, and was notorious in the past for shipwrecks, especially when the wind was from the east. Until modern times, many ships and their passengers were lost along the treacherous coastline from Howth to Dun Laoghaire, less than a kilometre from shore.

The Bay is a C-shaped inlet of the Irish Sea and is about 10 kilometres wide along its north-south base, and 7 km in length to its apex at the centre of the city of Dublin; stretching from Howth Head in the north to Dalkey Point in the south. North Bull Island is situated in the northwest part of the bay, where one of two major inshore sandbanks lie, and features a 5 km long sandy beach, Dollymount Strand, fronting an internationally recognised wildfowl reserve. Many of the rivers of Dublin reach the Irish Sea at Dublin Bay: the River Liffey, with the River Dodder flow received less than 1 km inland, River Tolka, and various smaller rivers and streams.

Dublin Bay FAQs

There are approximately ten beaches and bathing spots around Dublin Bay: Dollymount Strand; Forty Foot Bathing Place; Half Moon bathing spot; Merrion Strand; Bull Wall; Sandycove Beach; Sandymount Strand; Seapoint; Shelley Banks; Sutton, Burrow Beach

There are slipways on the north side of Dublin Bay at Clontarf, Sutton and on the southside at Dun Laoghaire Harbour, and in Dalkey at Coliemore and Bulloch Harbours.

Dublin Bay is administered by a number of Government Departments, three local authorities and several statutory agencies. Dublin Port Company is in charge of navigation on the Bay.

Dublin Bay is approximately 70 sq kilometres or 7,000 hectares. The Bay is about 10 kilometres wide along its north-south base, and seven km in length east-west to its peak at the centre of the city of Dublin; stretching from Howth Head in the north to Dalkey Point in the south.

Dun Laoghaire Harbour on the southside of the Bay has an East and West Pier, each one kilometre long; this is one of the largest human-made harbours in the world. There also piers or walls at the entrance to the River Liffey at Dublin city known as the Great North and South Walls. Other harbours on the Bay include Bulloch Harbour and Coliemore Harbours both at Dalkey.

There are two marinas on Dublin Bay. Ireland's largest marina with over 800 berths is on the southern shore at Dun Laoghaire Harbour. The other is at Poolbeg Yacht and Boat Club on the River Liffey close to Dublin City.

Car and passenger Ferries operate from Dublin Port to the UK, Isle of Man and France. A passenger ferry operates from Dun Laoghaire Harbour to Howth as well as providing tourist voyages around the bay.

Dublin Bay has two Islands. Bull Island at Clontarf and Dalkey Island on the southern shore of the Bay.

The River Liffey flows through Dublin city and into the Bay. Its tributaries include the River Dodder, the River Poddle and the River Camac.

Dollymount, Burrow and Seapoint beaches

Approximately 1,500 boats from small dinghies to motorboats to ocean-going yachts. The vast majority, over 1,000, are moored at Dun Laoghaire Harbour which is Ireland's boating capital.

In 1981, UNESCO recognised the importance of Dublin Bay by designating North Bull Island as a Biosphere because of its rare and internationally important habitats and species of wildlife. To support sustainable development, UNESCO’s concept of a Biosphere has evolved to include not just areas of ecological value but also the areas around them and the communities that live and work within these areas. There have since been additional international and national designations, covering much of Dublin Bay, to ensure the protection of its water quality and biodiversity. To fulfil these broader management aims for the ecosystem, the Biosphere was expanded in 2015. The Biosphere now covers Dublin Bay, reflecting its significant environmental, economic, cultural and tourism importance, and extends to over 300km² to include the bay, the shore and nearby residential areas.

On the Southside at Dun Laoghaire, there is the National Yacht Club, Royal St. George Yacht Club, Royal Irish Yacht Club and Dun Laoghaire Motor Yacht Club as well as Dublin Bay Sailing Club. In the city centre, there is Poolbeg Yacht and Boat Club. On the Northside of Dublin, there is Clontarf Yacht and Boat Club and Sutton Dinghy Club. While not on Dublin Bay, Howth Yacht Club is the major north Dublin Sailing centre.

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