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Dublin Bay Boating News and Information

Dublin Bay Sailing and Boating News
Bray Watch Goes Online
Bray Sailing Club in County Wicklow is up and running with a new CCTV system and the harbour cam has online access. Fancy a quick peek at this east coast harbour just a mile south of Dublin bay? Click HERE
Drilling of Test Boreholes in Dublin Bay
A jack-up rig barge has been positioned off the South Wall, Dublin Port, writes Jehan Ashmore. The barge is contracted to Dublin City Council for the drilling of test boreholes in the approaches to and within Dublin Bay in relation…
Film To Seek "Treasure Island" in Dublin Bay
Ahoy me hearties...Dublin Bay is to become the setting for "Treasure Island", the classic adventure story by Robert Louis Stephenson, with filming scheduled next month, writes Jehan Ashmore. The 145-foot Earl of Pembroke, a three-masted barque will be centre-stage. Shooting…
Four Championships (and a Mega Party) Planned for Dun Laoghaire 2011
There is a new helmsman at the wheel of Dun Laoghaire regatta next season and after taking soundings from local Dublin Bay classes, new event boss Adam Winkelmann is expecting in excess of 500 boats, despite the hard times. 'We…
Ships Meet In Dublin Port: Recall Collision in Dublin Bay
As the ro-ro ferry Norcape departed Dublin Port last Monday, on a routine sailing to Liverpool, the vessel passed the docked general dry-cargo bulker Wilson Tana. The vessels were involved in a collision in Dublin Bay, over 20 years ago,…
Royal Navy Mine-Hunter to Visit Dublin
A courtesy visit by the Royal Navy's HMS Bangor (M106) is due in Dublin tomorrow. The mine counter-measure vessel is base-ported at HM Naval Base, Clyde, Scotland and is named after Bangor, the shoreside town on Belfast Lough. For over 15 years, the…
Underwater Dublin Bay Survey to Start on Friday
An underwater survey of Dublin Bay is expected to commence this Friday, (1st October 2010). It is part of a Dublin City Council (DCC) project to upgrade the Ringsend Wastewater Treatment Plant. Preliminary works will include a Bathymetric Survey of…
Honouring Sean 'Dublin Bay' Loftus
Plans are being made to commemorate Dublin Bay’s self-appointed guardian, the late Sean Loftus. Clontarf Ward Councillor Damian O’Farrell (Ind) tabled a motion at this week’s area committee meeting calling for a suitable memorial to be put in place to honour…
Largest Ever Cruiseship to Dublin Set to Return
The largest ever cruiseship in terms of gross tonnage (GT) is due to return to Dublin next Wednesday (25 August) writes Jehan Ashmore. The giant vessel measures 117,651gt and has a total of 19 decks and a passenger capacity of…
Tankers Load Fuel in Dublin Bay
In a highly unusual procedure, a tanker took on bunkers (loading of fuel) while anchored in Dublin Bay. The procedure took place on 2 August when the Whitstar (2,159gt) moored alongside the larger Pembroke Fisher (9,356gt) writes Jehan Ashmore. The Whitstar had arrived…
Dublin Port Company Presents Rare Ship's Pass to the National Library
A ship's pass dated 1687, signed by King James II and Samuel Pepys, which was acquired by the Dublin Port & Docks board in 1924, was presented to the National Library of Ireland today by Enda Connellan, CEO, Dublin Port…
'The World' Arrives on Dublin Bay! Pics Here!
The World, a 644 foot ship, owned by its residents arrived at the Poolbeg lighthouse on Dublin bay yesterday afternoon (Wednesday, August 4 2010) for a four day stop over in Dublin. The residents, from about 40 different countries, live…
Wing Sail Craft Pays a Visit to Dun Laoghaire
It was plane sailing when Larinka berthed at the town marina in Dun Laoghaire this afternoon. The unusual sight of a winged sail jutting above the breakwater made her an obvious target for boating folk. The interesting vessel is the…
New Business Could Float in on the Tide
Local TD and Minister of Sport Mary Hanafin has given her support to Dun Laoghaire Harbour Company's initiative to promote the town as a cruise tourism destination on Dublin Bay. Writing in her latest newsletter to constituents this month, the…
Minister for Sport Goes Sailing
Minister for Sport and local TD Mary Hanafin made good on a long-standing promise to go sailing when she joined 'Wow' (Women on the Water) scheme that held a one-day event at the National Yacht Club in Dún Laoghaire, yesterday.…
Champagne Sailing for Royal Irish Regatta
The Royal Irish offered up a full three courses of delectable conditions at the weekend, with beautiful blue skies and up to 25 knots on Dublin Bay for their annual regatta.  While the cruiser and one-design courses were kept out…

Dublin Bay

Dublin Bay on the east coast of Ireland stretches over seven kilometres, from Howth Head on its northern tip to Dalkey Island in the south. It's a place most Dubliners simply take for granted, and one of the capital's least visited places. But there's more going on out there than you'd imagine.

The biggest boating centre is at Dun Laoghaire Harbour on the Bay's south shore that is home to over 1,500 pleasure craft, four waterfront yacht clubs and Ireland's largest marina.

The bay is rather shallow with many sandbanks and rocky outcrops, and was notorious in the past for shipwrecks, especially when the wind was from the east. Until modern times, many ships and their passengers were lost along the treacherous coastline from Howth to Dun Laoghaire, less than a kilometre from shore.

The Bay is a C-shaped inlet of the Irish Sea and is about 10 kilometres wide along its north-south base, and 7 km in length to its apex at the centre of the city of Dublin; stretching from Howth Head in the north to Dalkey Point in the south. North Bull Island is situated in the northwest part of the bay, where one of two major inshore sandbanks lie, and features a 5 km long sandy beach, Dollymount Strand, fronting an internationally recognised wildfowl reserve. Many of the rivers of Dublin reach the Irish Sea at Dublin Bay: the River Liffey, with the River Dodder flow received less than 1 km inland, River Tolka, and various smaller rivers and streams.

Dublin Bay FAQs

There are approximately ten beaches and bathing spots around Dublin Bay: Dollymount Strand; Forty Foot Bathing Place; Half Moon bathing spot; Merrion Strand; Bull Wall; Sandycove Beach; Sandymount Strand; Seapoint; Shelley Banks; Sutton, Burrow Beach

There are slipways on the north side of Dublin Bay at Clontarf, Sutton and on the southside at Dun Laoghaire Harbour, and in Dalkey at Coliemore and Bulloch Harbours.

Dublin Bay is administered by a number of Government Departments, three local authorities and several statutory agencies. Dublin Port Company is in charge of navigation on the Bay.

Dublin Bay is approximately 70 sq kilometres or 7,000 hectares. The Bay is about 10 kilometres wide along its north-south base, and seven km in length east-west to its peak at the centre of the city of Dublin; stretching from Howth Head in the north to Dalkey Point in the south.

Dun Laoghaire Harbour on the southside of the Bay has an East and West Pier, each one kilometre long; this is one of the largest human-made harbours in the world. There also piers or walls at the entrance to the River Liffey at Dublin city known as the Great North and South Walls. Other harbours on the Bay include Bulloch Harbour and Coliemore Harbours both at Dalkey.

There are two marinas on Dublin Bay. Ireland's largest marina with over 800 berths is on the southern shore at Dun Laoghaire Harbour. The other is at Poolbeg Yacht and Boat Club on the River Liffey close to Dublin City.

Car and passenger Ferries operate from Dublin Port to the UK, Isle of Man and France. A passenger ferry operates from Dun Laoghaire Harbour to Howth as well as providing tourist voyages around the bay.

Dublin Bay has two Islands. Bull Island at Clontarf and Dalkey Island on the southern shore of the Bay.

The River Liffey flows through Dublin city and into the Bay. Its tributaries include the River Dodder, the River Poddle and the River Camac.

Dollymount, Burrow and Seapoint beaches

Approximately 1,500 boats from small dinghies to motorboats to ocean-going yachts. The vast majority, over 1,000, are moored at Dun Laoghaire Harbour which is Ireland's boating capital.

In 1981, UNESCO recognised the importance of Dublin Bay by designating North Bull Island as a Biosphere because of its rare and internationally important habitats and species of wildlife. To support sustainable development, UNESCO’s concept of a Biosphere has evolved to include not just areas of ecological value but also the areas around them and the communities that live and work within these areas. There have since been additional international and national designations, covering much of Dublin Bay, to ensure the protection of its water quality and biodiversity. To fulfil these broader management aims for the ecosystem, the Biosphere was expanded in 2015. The Biosphere now covers Dublin Bay, reflecting its significant environmental, economic, cultural and tourism importance, and extends to over 300km² to include the bay, the shore and nearby residential areas.

On the Southside at Dun Laoghaire, there is the National Yacht Club, Royal St. George Yacht Club, Royal Irish Yacht Club and Dun Laoghaire Motor Yacht Club as well as Dublin Bay Sailing Club. In the city centre, there is Poolbeg Yacht and Boat Club. On the Northside of Dublin, there is Clontarf Yacht and Boat Club and Sutton Dinghy Club. While not on Dublin Bay, Howth Yacht Club is the major north Dublin Sailing centre.

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