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Displaying items by tag: Burke Shipping Group

#ArklowsLastestLaunch – Arklow Breeze had the honour of been launched as the newest and final newbuild of six cargoships from a Dutch yard last Friday, writes Jehan Ashmore.

The ceremony for Yard No. (Nb) 414 saw a successfull sideways launch at the Westerbroek yard of Ferus Smit. The same Dutch yard having completed all of the previous bulk oriented general cargoships of 8,660dwt for Arklow Shipping. She joins the company's Dutch division based in Rotterdam, Arklow Shipping Netherland N.V.

A 119m long hull form without a bulb-less bow design has given the series 'green' credentials. This is to improve operating efficiency by reducing wave resistance in varying sea-state conditions without compromising on cargo-loads.

The bulb-less concept, instead features a straight-stemmed bow to allow a slender hull entry to slice into the waves. While at the same time taking into account various loading drafts. Total performance of this bow design will also be better than that of a bulb optimised for one single-draft and flat water only conditions.

Almost a year ago, Arklow Bay was also given a spectacular launch, see VIDEO. As for Arklow Breeze she is due to enter service next month.

She follows Arklow Brave which called to Dublin Port this month and whose agents are the Burke Shipping Group which invested in new port infrastructure late last year.

The new cargoship had loaded scrap metal elsewhere in the port alongside the Hammond Lane Metal Company. She departed laden with the cargo bound for Leixoes in Portugal.

The sisters will be mainly employed in the shipment of wheat, corn and other bulk commodities in European waters.

Published in Ports & Shipping

#GreenorePort - Burke Shipping Group, the principal operating subsidiary of the Doyle Group, has The Irish Times writes acquired Greenore Port in Co Louth.

Previously the port was jointly owned by One51 and the state-owned Dublin Port Company. The price Burke Shipping paid for the port is not known but it is thought to be in the region of €5 million. Burke did not respond to requests for comment.

The company, which employs 300 people and has offices in all major Irish ports, is understood to plan to invest a substantial sum in improving Greenore. It will be the first significant port to be entirely privately owned in the Republic.

Burke Shipping plans to target the container and bulk shipping market and compete with the Dublin Port Company and other ports for this business.

Greenore is strategically located next to the Dublin-Belfast economic corridor, so it is capable of servicing both cities. For more on the acquisition by the group click HERE.

The group as previously reported were a potential bidder back in August.

More recently an investment in port infrastructure at their Dublin Port container terminal has further consolidated the company's business in the lo-lo sector.

 

Published in Ports & Shipping

#NewGantryCrane – A new rubber tyre gantry crane (RGT) for Burke Shipping Group's container terminal in Dublin Port is currently been assembled and is due to be operational in a fortnight, writes Jehan Ashmore.

The investment by BSG in the quayside infrastructure is to facilitate growing demand and increase capacity at the container terminal located in Alexandra Basin.

The RTG was manufactured by Killarney based Liebherr Container Cranes. This brings to 7 the total of RTG's in operation coupled with 12 cranes representing a €30 million investment by BSG.

In addition to the group operates container terminals in Belfast, Cork and Foynes.

 

Published in Dublin Port

#GreenorePort – The Irish Times reports that the Burke Shipping Group, has emerged as a bidder in the final stages of the race for Greenore port in Co Louth.

It is one of three remaining bidders for the port, which as previously reported is jointly owned by the investment company One51 and the State-owned Dublin Port Company.

Warrenpoint Harbour, which recently announced its pre-tax profit doubled to £850,000 (€1.07 million) in 2013, is also among the final bidders for the port. The third bidder is believed to be a family-owned company with interests in transport.

Greenore is strategically located next to the Dublin-Belfast economic corridor, so it is capable of servicing both cities, meaning its new owner will be watched out for closely by Irish exporters.

For much more on this story click HERE.

Published in Ports & Shipping
The opening this week of a new rail-spur in Dublin Port by Minister for Transport Leo Varadkar T.D.,brings a boost to rail freight competitiveness, writes Jehan Ashmore.
Dublin Port Company invested €1.5m for the 1.6km long rail-spur expansion which links freight-trains directly alongside ships berthed at Ocean Pier. The new facility at the Common User Terminal eliminates the need for loading and unloading trucks at Alexandra Basin East (click MAP)

The minister welcomed "the important investment by Dublin Port Company in its rail network. It will further enhance the attractiveness of the port as a destination for rail-based freight. The project represents a commitment on the part of Dublin Port Company and Iarnród Éireann to customers who want to move goods by rail".

The project took six months to complete and the public private partnership involved Dublin Port Company, Iarnród Éireann and the first customer of the new facility, International Warehousing and Transport (IWT).

IWT is a privately owned Irish logistics company, which already operates freight-trains to Ballina that are expected to increase from 4 to 5 trains per week in each direction as a result of this investment. The rail-operator believes that the service will save up to 5.5million road kilometres annually and reduce CO2 emissions by up to 2,750 tonnes.

The Irish Exporters Association also welcomed the development of the IWT freight operation at the new facility, where increased frequency in services will enhance Ireland's contribution to the European Union's modal shift aspirations from road to rail.

The Common User Terminal is also open to other shipping companies. Existing clients using the lo-lo container terminal operated by Burke Shipping Group through its subsidiary Portroe Stevedores are C2C Lines, APL, Coastal Containers, Evergreen, Gracechurch and OOCL . The terminal also has a ro-ro berth facility where CLdN /Cobelfret operate from on routes to Belgium and The Netherlands. 

In addition to the Dublin-Ballina service the port exports 400,000 tonnes of lead and zinc concentrate from the freight customers Boliden/Tara Mines with 15 trains per week. The facility at Alexandra Basin Jetty is regularly served by vessels from Arklow Shipping Ltd, where the 2011 newbuild Arklow Field (2,998 tonnes) is currently berthed.

Published in Dublin Port

About Dublin Port 

Dublin Port Company is currently investing about €277 million on its Alexandra Basin Redevelopment (ABR), which is due to be complete by 2021. The redevelopment will improve the port's capacity for large ships by deepening and lengthening 3km of its 7km of berths. The ABR is part of a €1bn capital programme up to 2028, which will also include initial work on the Dublin Port’s MP2 Project - a major capital development project proposal for works within the existing port lands in the northeastern part of the port.

Dublin Port has also recently secured planning approval for the development of the next phase of its inland port near Dublin Airport. The latest stage of the inland port will include a site with the capacity to store more than 2,000 shipping containers and infrastructures such as an ESB substation, an office building and gantry crane.

Dublin Port Company recently submitted a planning application for a €320 million project that aims to provide significant additional capacity at the facility within the port in order to cope with increases in trade up to 2040. The scheme will see a new roll-on/roll-off jetty built to handle ferries of up to 240 metres in length, as well as the redevelopment of an oil berth into a deep-water container berth.

Dublin Port FAQ

Dublin was little more than a monastic settlement until the Norse invasion in the 8th and 9th centuries when they selected the Liffey Estuary as their point of entry to the country as it provided relatively easy access to the central plains of Ireland. Trading with England and Europe followed which required port facilities, so the development of Dublin Port is inextricably linked to the development of Dublin City, so it is fair to say the origins of the Port go back over one thousand years. As a result, the modern organisation Dublin Port has a long and remarkable history, dating back over 300 years from 1707.

The original Port of Dublin was situated upriver, a few miles from its current location near the modern Civic Offices at Wood Quay and close to Christchurch Cathedral. The Port remained close to that area until the new Custom House opened in the 1790s. In medieval times Dublin shipped cattle hides to Britain and the continent, and the returning ships carried wine, pottery and other goods.

510 acres. The modern Dublin Port is located either side of the River Liffey, out to its mouth. On the north side of the river, the central part (205 hectares or 510 acres) of the Port lies at the end of East Wall and North Wall, from Alexandra Quay.

Dublin Port Company is a State-owned commercial company responsible for operating and developing Dublin Port.

Dublin Port Company is a self-financing, and profitable private limited company wholly-owned by the State, whose business is to manage Dublin Port, Ireland's premier Port. Established as a corporate entity in 1997, Dublin Port Company is responsible for the management, control, operation and development of the Port.

Captain William Bligh (of Mutiny of the Bounty fame) was a visitor to Dublin in 1800, and his visit to the capital had a lasting effect on the Port. Bligh's study of the currents in Dublin Bay provided the basis for the construction of the North Wall. This undertaking led to the growth of Bull Island to its present size.

Yes. Dublin Port is the largest freight and passenger port in Ireland. It handles almost 50% of all trade in the Republic of Ireland.

All cargo handling activities being carried out by private sector companies operating in intensely competitive markets within the Port. Dublin Port Company provides world-class facilities, services, accommodation and lands in the harbour for ships, goods and passengers.

Eamonn O'Reilly is the Dublin Port Chief Executive.

Capt. Michael McKenna is the Dublin Port Harbour Master

In 2019, 1,949,229 people came through the Port.

In 2019, there were 158 cruise liner visits.

In 2019, 9.4 million gross tonnes of exports were handled by Dublin Port.

In 2019, there were 7,898 ship arrivals.

In 2019, there was a gross tonnage of 38.1 million.

In 2019, there were 559,506 tourist vehicles.

There were 98,897 lorries in 2019

Boats can navigate the River Liffey into Dublin by using the navigational guidelines. Find the guidelines on this page here.

VHF channel 12. Commercial vessels using Dublin Port or Dun Laoghaire Port typically have a qualified pilot or certified master with proven local knowledge on board. They "listen out" on VHF channel 12 when in Dublin Port's jurisdiction.

A Dublin Bay webcam showing the south of the Bay at Dun Laoghaire and a distant view of Dublin Port Shipping is here
Dublin Port is creating a distributed museum on its lands in Dublin City.
 A Liffey Tolka Project cycle and pedestrian way is the key to link the elements of this distributed museum together.  The distributed museum starts at the Diving Bell and, over the course of 6.3km, will give Dubliners a real sense of the City, the Port and the Bay.  For visitors, it will be a unique eye-opening stroll and vista through and alongside one of Europe’s busiest ports:  Diving Bell along Sir John Rogerson’s Quay over the Samuel Beckett Bridge, past the Scherzer Bridge and down the North Wall Quay campshire to Berth 18 - 1.2 km.   Liffey Tolka Project - Tree-lined pedestrian and cycle route between the River Liffey and the Tolka Estuary - 1.4 km with a 300-metre spur along Alexandra Road to The Pumphouse (to be completed by Q1 2021) and another 200 metres to The Flour Mill.   Tolka Estuary Greenway - Construction of Phase 1 (1.9 km) starts in December 2020 and will be completed by Spring 2022.  Phase 2 (1.3 km) will be delivered within the following five years.  The Pumphouse is a heritage zone being created as part of the Alexandra Basin Redevelopment Project.  The first phase of 1.6 acres will be completed in early 2021 and will include historical port equipment and buildings and a large open space for exhibitions and performances.  It will be expanded in a subsequent phase to incorporate the Victorian Graving Dock No. 1 which will be excavated and revealed. 
 The largest component of the distributed museum will be The Flour Mill.  This involves the redevelopment of the former Odlums Flour Mill on Alexandra Road based on a masterplan completed by Grafton Architects to provide a mix of port operational uses, a National Maritime Archive, two 300 seat performance venues, working and studio spaces for artists and exhibition spaces.   The Flour Mill will be developed in stages over the remaining twenty years of Masterplan 2040 alongside major port infrastructure projects.

Source: Dublin Port Company ©Afloat 2020. 

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