Menu

Ireland's sailing, boating & maritime magazine

Displaying items by tag: Celtic Link Ferries

#FarewellCelticLink - Celtic Link Ferries final farewell sailing arrived into Rosslare this morning from Cherbourg, marking an end of the era as the Wexford based company are been acquired by Stena Line with effect today, writes Jehan Ashmore, who travelled on board the ro-pax Celtic Horizon.

The last crossing was in command of Captain Richard Collins and his crew of 50 that operate services on board the 27,522 tonnes Visentini shipyard-built ro-pax. The 17-hour continental route will continue to maintain a sailing schedule of three return-crossings weekly when Stena Line rename the vessel for their first sailing tomorrow.

As Celtic Horizon bade farewell to Cherbourg yesterday afternoon, she cast her moorings alongside the former trans-Atlantic liner terminal, now the maritime and undersea exploration visitor attraction 'La Cité de la Mer'.

On board Celtic Horizon where excited French teenage students that occupied the uppermost deck drenched in 18-degrees sunlight and to the sound of the ship's horn marking her final departure.

Asides the countless coach based students that have travelled since Celtic Link began reinstating the service in 2005, after P&O Ferries abandoned the route the previous year, the company has catered for a diverse market that includes passengers on foot and in cars, camper-vans and motorcyclists.

In respect to freight, this involved un-accompanied freight-units and trucks notably carrying livestock trade, in which 18 such large trucks were conveyed on yesterday's sailing to Cherbourg during the busy calve season. Over the years there have been contracts to import French manufactured trade vehicles.

Of primary importance is fish exports to French, Spain, Italy and beyond, this was one of the major reasons why the owners of Celtic Link, the O'Flaherty brothers (and local investors) who operate a fish processing plant in Kilmore Quay and fleet of more a dozen trawlers purchased P&O's service.

Celtic dep Cherbourg

Celtic Ferries departs Cherbourg Photo Jehan Ashmore

The deal had involved the route's existing freight-vessel European Diplomat, which incidentally formed part of the Falklands Task Force in 1982, however as Celtic Link's 'Diplomat' she served a limited passenger service for Celtic Link. She was displaced by ro-pax Norman Voyager which last week started new Brittany Ferries Économie services.

In 2011 Celtic Horizon which is the same ro-pax design of Norman Voyager, entered service on a five-year charter from the Italian shipyard owners to Celtic Link.

Celtic Horizon became the first and only vessel during the last nine years of the ferry company to be given a name reflecting her trading route and her owner's brand name displayed on her funnel.

Watch this space... with further reports from Afloat.ie's dedicated Ferry News section.

Published in Ferry

#FreePetTravel - Celtic Link Ferries are transporting pets free-of-charge between Ireland and France.

The Irish owned ferry company operating on the Rosslare-Cherbourg route is giving passengers a choice of bringing their pets which can be kept in kennels supplied on board or in the passenger's vehicle.

Passengers will be able to visit their pets in kennels throughout the sailing and for those pets kept in their vehicle, they must visit under crew supervision. For further details visit their Link.

The route's ro-pax vessel Celtic Horizon sails from Rosslare to Cherbourg every Tuesday, Thursday and Saturday and sails from Cherbourg to Rosslare every Wednesday, Friday and Sunday.

Published in Ferry

#StPatricksSailing – Following Ireland's rugby triumph of the Six Nation's Championship yesterday in France, Celtic Link Ferries final promotional €1 crossing for St. Patrick's Day, has set sail this afternoon from Cherbourg to Rosslare, writes Jehan Ashmore.

As previously reported, Stena Line in February announced that they were to acquire Celtic Link, the Wexford based single-ferry operator, which only introduced the chartered Italian built and flagged ro-pax ferry Celtic Horizon in 2011. The 1,000 passenger, 200-car, 120 freight-unit vessel will continue serving the 17-hour Ireland-France link, a first for Stena Line which are to acquire the company's business on the route, with effect from 31 March.

In the meantime, there will be no doubt be a celebratory mode on board Celtic Horizon, on foot of the sporting success in the Stade de France venue outside Paris, combined with the Irish national day.

Among the passenger facilities on the overnight ferry are the Cherbourg Café, Tuskar Rock Bar and Lounge, a restaurant, cinema lounge and souvenir kiosk shop and accommodation in 2,4 and 6 berths cabins plus luxury suites.

To gain a further insight into the day to day running of the Celtic Horizon, built by Cantiere Navala Visentini shipyard in Portoviro, you can read an interview about one of her masters, Captain Richard Collins, by clicking this 'link' to a feature published in Ships Monthly.

Celtic Horizon is the only vessel of the company to have been clearly given a name directly associated with her owners trading route.

Her predecessors were Norman Voyager, another Visentini ro-pax of the same design and recently renamed Etretat for Brittany Ferries 'Economie' services and freight-ferry Diplomat which was scrapped in recent years.

She was the first vessel to launch operations for Celtic Link in 2005 following P&O Ferries withdrawal on the continental route the previous year.

 

Published in Ferry

#HalfPriceCabins – Celtic Link Ferries are currently running a half-price cabin sale between Rosslare and Cherbourg served by the ro-pax, Celtic Horizon, writes Jehan Ashmore.

"It's just our way of making travelling to France easier" said a company spokesperson.

Celtic Horizon provides passengers a choice of 2-berth, 4-berth, 6-berth and luxurious suite cabins. These three suites are situated overlooking the bow. Cabins in all categories come with en-suite facilities and the beds in each cabin are full-sized.

The half-price cabin sale is subject to terms and conditions, noting only applies to new bookings and are not applicable to bookings taken in June, July or August.

The company claim, Celtic Horizon operates more crossings between Ireland and France than any other ferry by sailing to a thrice weekly return sailing schedule.

She sails Rosslare-Cherbourg every Tuesday, Thursday and Saturday and returns from Normandy by departing Cherbourg on every Wednesday, Friday and Sunday respectively.

For further information visit: celticlinkferries.com/category/offers

 

Published in Ferry

#StenaBuyCeltic- Stena Line has acquired the Irish-owned Celtic Link Ferries service which operates the Rosslare-Cherbourg route.

Celtic Link currently provides a three times weekly service between Ireland and France with the MV Celtic Horizon, which can accommodate 1 000 passengers, 200 cars and 120 freight units.

Ian Davies, Stena Line's Route Manager (Irish Sea South) said: "The acquisition of the Rosslare-Cherbourg route is a key strategic investment for Stena Line and one which will help stimulate and strengthen new and existing opportunities for trade and tourism between Ireland, France and beyond. With confidence in the Irish economy strengthening, we see positive long term growth in tourist and freight traffic from the Continent as a real opportunity to help strengthen this economic growth further. The Celtic Horizon will continue to operate a year- round service and we look forward to introducing the Stena Line experience to the vessel for our customers to enjoy."

Michael McGrath, Stena Line's Chief Operating Officer commented: "This exciting investment represents an important milestone for Stena Line as for the first time in our history we will be able to offer a direct ferry link between the Republic of Ireland and the Continent. We believe we can bring significant added value to the route with our wealth of industry experience and award winning customer service standards which we are confident will help to stimulate increased traffic volumes in the future."

The all year round service currently operates three weekly sailings from Rosslare at 21.30 on Tuesday and Thursday with a Saturday sailing at 16.00. From Cherbourg the schedule is 21.00 on Wednesday and Friday with a Sunday sailing at 16.00 with a journey time of approx 17 hrs.

Final details are currently being concluded around the acquisition and Stena Line hopes to be in a position to take over the running of the service with effect from Monday 31st March 2014.

Published in Ferry

#SailStPatrick - A month to St. Patrick's Day and Celtic Link Ferries are offering a special €1 France-Ireland deal for the sailing on Sunday 16th March.

Passengers will have the opportunity to travel on board Celtic Horizon between Cherbourg-Rosslare with any tourist vehicle (car, van [up to 6.5m long and 2.5m high], motorhome, motorcycle, caravan, minibus or trailer) for as little as €1.

The promotion also includes everybody that is in the vehicle on the sailing that departs Cherbourg at 16.00hrs and arrives on the morning of St. Patrick's Day at 09.00hrs.

"Its simply an effort to get as many people to come to Ireland for St. Patrick's Day as possible" said a company spokesperson. We have more direct crossings than anybody else and with that we want as many people to use it as possible".

 

 

Published in Ferry

#ImprovedSchedule - Celtic Link Ferries Rosslare-Cherbourg route vessel, Celtic Horizon is to launch an improved sailing schedule in 2014, following a period of maintenance at Swansea Drydocks, writes Jehan Ashmore.

Currently the 27,522 tonnes ro-pax ferry is docked at the South Wales ship repair and recycling facility and is due to return to the Rosslare-Cherbourg route sometime between 11 and 14 January 2014. When the 1,000 passenger capacity vessel resumes service, the revised sailing schedule is to bring a more customer friendly schedule.

Celtic Link Ferries will now arrive and sail earlier on the weekend sailings. The improved sailing times will now provide customers to arrive earlier in port for the onward destination in France or Ireland.

"Celtic Link Ferries wants to give its passengers more opportunity to drive during delight hours at the weekend" said the company's Tourist Passenger Manager, Rory McCall.

"The most commonly issued request from our customers is to arrive and to sail earlier between Ireland and France, now we will do that".

Celtic Horizon will now sail at 21:00 on Friday night (local time) from Cherbourg, at 16:00 from Rosslare on Saturday and at 16:00 (local time) from France on Sunday.

The low-fares Irish owned ferry company will continue to operate more direct sailings between Ireland and France than any other company sailing on the direct services to the continent.

Published in Ferry

#ChristmasFerry - Celtic Link Ferries are operating the last sailing between Ireland and France before Christmas with a sailing on Saturday 21 December departing at 18:00.

The low-fares ferry company sail directly between Rosslare and Cherbourg. So to catch this ferry to France and return back home for Christmas, there will be still plenty of time to spare.

"Celtic Link Ferries want to give passengers as much opportunity to travel as possible" said Tourist Passenger Manager, Rory McCall. "Christmas is a special time where people are eager to get where they need to go".

The ferry 'Celtic Horizon' will return back to Rosslare after leaving Cherbourg on Sunday night at 19:00 (local time). Customers intending on travelling leading up to the festive season are encouraged to book early as cabin availability is limited.

 

Published in Ferry

#NewFerry – Irish Ferries chartered ro-pax Epsilon called to Rosslare Europort from Cherbourg this morning, her arrival to Irish waters follows a repositioning voyage starting almost a week ago from Sicily, writes Jehan Ashmore.

Under the command of Captain Paul Sellers, Epsilon approached the Wexford ferryport from where Irish Ferries Pembroke Dock bound Isle of Inishmore vacated her berth for the newcomer.

Ironically at the adjacent berth to where Cartour Epsilon (2011/26,325grt) berthed was Celtic Horizon (2006/27,522grt) of Celtic Link Ferries which in 2011 entered service on their service to Cherbourg. She is a sister and former fleetmate which as Cartour Beta also served Italian operator Charonte & Tourist.

Epsilon's call to the Wexford port was likewise to Cherbourg to carry out berthing trails when Irish Ferries requires relief cover on southern services.

She is due to make the final leg of her journey to Dublin Port to where the ro-pax ferry is to enter service on the Holyhead route this week and in the New Year launch a new Dublin Port-Cherbourg route.

Also berthed in Rosslare Harbour was Stena Europe, the Fishguard route ferry which was fresh from annual maintenance following dry-docking in Birkenhead.

 

Published in Ferry

#FerryChernobyl - Celtic Link Ferries are delighted to support Chernobyl Ireland Humanitarian Aid as the charity continue to help the children of Grozovo School in Minsk, Belarus.

The ferry operator would like to take the opportunity to wish Chernobyl Ireland continued success in their tireless mission to provide food and water, comfortable living conditions, and other supplies to children who really need it.

If you would like to become a volunteer or host a child through Chernobyl Aid Ireland, contact: 051-858944 or for further information visit: www.chernobylaidireland.ie/

Celtic Link Ferries operate three round-trip sailings weekly between Rosslare and Cherbourg which is run by the ro-pax vessel Celtic Horizon.

 

Published in Ferry
Page 1 of 6

About Dublin Port 

Dublin Port is Ireland’s largest and busiest port with approximately 17,000 vessel movements per year. As well as being the country’s largest port, Dublin Port has the highest rate of growth and, in the seven years to 2019, total cargo volumes grew by 36.1%.

The vision of Dublin Port Company is to have the required capacity to service the needs of its customers and the wider economy safely, efficiently and sustainably. Dublin Port will integrate with the City by enhancing the natural and built environments. The Port is being developed in line with Masterplan 2040.

Dublin Port Company is currently investing about €277 million on its Alexandra Basin Redevelopment (ABR), which is due to be complete by 2021. The redevelopment will improve the port's capacity for large ships by deepening and lengthening 3km of its 7km of berths. The ABR is part of a €1bn capital programme up to 2028, which will also include initial work on the Dublin Port’s MP2 Project - a major capital development project proposal for works within the existing port lands in the northeastern part of the port.

Dublin Port has also recently secured planning approval for the development of the next phase of its inland port near Dublin Airport. The latest stage of the inland port will include a site with the capacity to store more than 2,000 shipping containers and infrastructures such as an ESB substation, an office building and gantry crane.

Dublin Port Company recently submitted a planning application for a €320 million project that aims to provide significant additional capacity at the facility within the port in order to cope with increases in trade up to 2040. The scheme will see a new roll-on/roll-off jetty built to handle ferries of up to 240 metres in length, as well as the redevelopment of an oil berth into a deep-water container berth.

Dublin Port FAQ

Dublin was little more than a monastic settlement until the Norse invasion in the 8th and 9th centuries when they selected the Liffey Estuary as their point of entry to the country as it provided relatively easy access to the central plains of Ireland. Trading with England and Europe followed which required port facilities, so the development of Dublin Port is inextricably linked to the development of Dublin City, so it is fair to say the origins of the Port go back over one thousand years. As a result, the modern organisation Dublin Port has a long and remarkable history, dating back over 300 years from 1707.

The original Port of Dublin was situated upriver, a few miles from its current location near the modern Civic Offices at Wood Quay and close to Christchurch Cathedral. The Port remained close to that area until the new Custom House opened in the 1790s. In medieval times Dublin shipped cattle hides to Britain and the continent, and the returning ships carried wine, pottery and other goods.

510 acres. The modern Dublin Port is located either side of the River Liffey, out to its mouth. On the north side of the river, the central part (205 hectares or 510 acres) of the Port lies at the end of East Wall and North Wall, from Alexandra Quay.

Dublin Port Company is a State-owned commercial company responsible for operating and developing Dublin Port.

Dublin Port Company is a self-financing, and profitable private limited company wholly-owned by the State, whose business is to manage Dublin Port, Ireland's premier Port. Established as a corporate entity in 1997, Dublin Port Company is responsible for the management, control, operation and development of the Port.

Captain William Bligh (of Mutiny of the Bounty fame) was a visitor to Dublin in 1800, and his visit to the capital had a lasting effect on the Port. Bligh's study of the currents in Dublin Bay provided the basis for the construction of the North Wall. This undertaking led to the growth of Bull Island to its present size.

Yes. Dublin Port is the largest freight and passenger port in Ireland. It handles almost 50% of all trade in the Republic of Ireland.

All cargo handling activities being carried out by private sector companies operating in intensely competitive markets within the Port. Dublin Port Company provides world-class facilities, services, accommodation and lands in the harbour for ships, goods and passengers.

Eamonn O'Reilly is the Dublin Port Chief Executive.

Capt. Michael McKenna is the Dublin Port Harbour Master

In 2019, 1,949,229 people came through the Port.

In 2019, there were 158 cruise liner visits.

In 2019, 9.4 million gross tonnes of exports were handled by Dublin Port.

In 2019, there were 7,898 ship arrivals.

In 2019, there was a gross tonnage of 38.1 million.

In 2019, there were 559,506 tourist vehicles.

There were 98,897 lorries in 2019

Boats can navigate the River Liffey into Dublin by using the navigational guidelines. Find the guidelines on this page here.

VHF channel 12. Commercial vessels using Dublin Port or Dun Laoghaire Port typically have a qualified pilot or certified master with proven local knowledge on board. They "listen out" on VHF channel 12 when in Dublin Port's jurisdiction.

A Dublin Bay webcam showing the south of the Bay at Dun Laoghaire and a distant view of Dublin Port Shipping is here
Dublin Port is creating a distributed museum on its lands in Dublin City.
 A Liffey Tolka Project cycle and pedestrian way is the key to link the elements of this distributed museum together.  The distributed museum starts at the Diving Bell and, over the course of 6.3km, will give Dubliners a real sense of the City, the Port and the Bay.  For visitors, it will be a unique eye-opening stroll and vista through and alongside one of Europe’s busiest ports:  Diving Bell along Sir John Rogerson’s Quay over the Samuel Beckett Bridge, past the Scherzer Bridge and down the North Wall Quay campshire to Berth 18 - 1.2 km.   Liffey Tolka Project - Tree-lined pedestrian and cycle route between the River Liffey and the Tolka Estuary - 1.4 km with a 300-metre spur along Alexandra Road to The Pumphouse (to be completed by Q1 2021) and another 200 metres to The Flour Mill.   Tolka Estuary Greenway - Construction of Phase 1 (1.9 km) starts in December 2020 and will be completed by Spring 2022.  Phase 2 (1.3 km) will be delivered within the following five years.  The Pumphouse is a heritage zone being created as part of the Alexandra Basin Redevelopment Project.  The first phase of 1.6 acres will be completed in early 2021 and will include historical port equipment and buildings and a large open space for exhibitions and performances.  It will be expanded in a subsequent phase to incorporate the Victorian Graving Dock No. 1 which will be excavated and revealed. 
 The largest component of the distributed museum will be The Flour Mill.  This involves the redevelopment of the former Odlums Flour Mill on Alexandra Road based on a masterplan completed by Grafton Architects to provide a mix of port operational uses, a National Maritime Archive, two 300 seat performance venues, working and studio spaces for artists and exhibition spaces.   The Flour Mill will be developed in stages over the remaining twenty years of Masterplan 2040 alongside major port infrastructure projects.

Source: Dublin Port Company ©Afloat 2020.