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Displaying items by tag: Cruise & Maritime Voyages

A UK cruise operator Cruise & Maritime Voyages (CMV) has gone into administration, with the “global pandemic of seismic proportions” being blamed for its demise.

The line, writes The Telegraph, which has six ships in its fleet and was founded in 2010, has “ceased trading with immediate effect”, according to administrators Duff & Phelps. It comes after concerns were raised last month that the company was in desperate need of additional funding – which it said it was “confident” of securing.

There are no passengers on board any of CMV’s vessels, with all operations paused since March. It has been due to resume sailing on August 25. All future bookings have been cancelled.

Customers who had trips booked can find out how to get their money back on Cruise & Maritime Voyages’ website. The company mainly sold cruise packages, which are protected by ABTA, and a smaller number of flight-inclusive packages which are protected by ATOL.

For much from the newspaper click here. 

In addition Afloat adds a link to CMV website which announced its news of administration (yesterday, 20 July) and advice for clients of the operator click here

The classic cruiseship once a former Soviet era liner, was a frequent caller to Irish ports over the last decade and of recent years fleetmate Magellan which 'homeported' out of Dublin Port and Cork (Cobh) catering for the Irish marketplace.

Published in Cruise Liners

#CruiseMedley – Cruiseships small and large called to the capital to add to the summertime atmosphere of Dublin Riverfest's gathering of tallships that graced the Liffey quays, writes Jehan Ashmore.

Hebridean Sky, the intimate sized ship of just 4,200 gross tonnage had berthed at the North Wall Quay Extension. The pier lies to the east of the Tom Clarke toll-bridge, where the new two-berth cruise berth is to located.

Guests of the Swoop-Antartica adventure ship could been on the uppermost deck at the stern. From this elevated view they could overlook the toll-bridge and beyond to the busy scene of tallships in the direction of the city-centre.

At the end of this ‘extension’ of the North Wall where the tallships met to welcome thousands over the three day event, was berthed in Alexandra Basin the 44,000 gross tonnage Artania. This ship had sailed from Bremerhaven, Germany. 

On the Sunday of the Dublin Riverfest, the UK ThunderCat powerboat team were based opposite of the Phoenix Reissen operated cruiseship that been the Poolbeg Yacht Boat Club & Marina. As pictured above the ThunderCats carried out a behind the scene flag-nation display practise involving race-crew members standing on the craft's twin hull. 

On the Bank Holiday Monday, Cruise & Maritime Voyages 46,000 gross tonnage Magellan, the UK operator’s current flagship called to the port for the first of five ‘home-porting’ calls. This is where Irish guests can join the 1,450 passenger ship that continued to Liverpool as part of a cruise to the Norwegian fjords.

According to CMV's Irish agent, JMG Travel, these Irish direct cruises have been sold-out. Following their success, a repeat season but with more direct cruises from Dublin is already scheduled for 2018.

The title of CMV flagship for Magellan will however be gone by next year’s season, as of this Thursday, the newly acquired successor is to be named Columbus at a ceremony in London. The 63,000 gross tonnage flagship will too be making a call to the Irish capital later this month. Albeit with a smaller capacity of just 775 passengers.

Also making a call on the Bank Holiday Monday and staying overnight was Hal America Line’s Prinsendam. As previously reported on Afloat, the smallest ship of the HAL cruise-fleet at 37,000 gross tonnage made an appearance for RTE TV's 'The Local Eye' series when calling to Killybegs.

The cruiseship with tiered stern decks remains in port until departing tonight. Likewise of Magellan this cruiseship is also bound for Merseyside.

Finally, the capital port's latest caller, Crystal Symphony docked today in Alexandra Basin. The 51,000 tonnes ship will too overnight and is operated by Crystal Cruises. 

Published in Cruise Liners

#ClassicLiner – A classic liner built for the Soviets more than 50 years ago that became a cruiseship sailing the seven seas and to both poles, called to Dublin Port today, writes Jehan Ashmore.

Marco Polo which is home-ported in London (Tilbury), is a classic ship steeped in maritime tradition and in which operators, Cruise & Maritime Voyages have a loyal following on this traditional ship.

The ocean-going lady of the sea had docked at Dublin mid-morning as part of UK and Irish ports cruise. Yesterday, her passengers visited western Scotland, to Tobermory on the Isle of Mull.

Today, passengers are exploring the capital and environs before re-embarking the 22,080 tonnes veteran vessel this evening. A departure time of 2200 is scheduled for the next port of call, the Scilly Isles off Cornwall.

The cruiseship is docked at Dublin’s Ocean Pier, apt given she served as a transatlantic liner between the USSR and Canada as the Alexandr Pushkin. The second of a quartet of the ‘poet’ class sisters was named after Russia’s greatest poets and writers. She was built in 1965 at the Mathias-Thesen Werft in Wismar, in the former East Germany.

Alexandr Pushkin operated in the summer between Leningrad, Bremerhaven, London, Le Havre and Montreal, a liner service she dutifully carried out until the late seventies. During the winter she cruised in warmer climes while mostly on charter to western companies.

The 800 capacity cruiseship was extensively re-built in 1993 and still retains classic lines, where tiered sun decks featuring a swimming pool and whirlpools overlook a cruiser stern. More unusual are the open decks below the bridge and overlooking the bow, a feature notably absent from today's giant enclosed cruiseships.

Published in Cruise Liners

#NewCMVflagship – UK operator, Cruise & Maritime Voyages (CMV) are to introduce Magellan in Spring 2015 as their new flagship and like the Marco Polo, Astor and Azores, she will operate as an adult-only friendly ship, writes Jehan Ashmore.

At 46,052grt Magellan is the largest member of the CMV fleet which in association with sister company TransOcean Kreuzfahrten operate a trio of river-based cruise vessels in Europe.

Magellan is to replace Discovery, which as previously on Afloat.ie, opened the Belfast Harbour cruise season this year and she is no stranger to other ports on this island. Launched in 1971 as Island Venture, she would later feature with her sister in the US TV series the 'Love Boat'. 

As for the Magellan her most recent career was with Costa Crociere serving as their Grand Holiday.  In 2010 there was a rebuild and capacity is for approximately 1,250 adult passengers (16 years plus). Accommodated is provided in 726 cabins (incl. 14 Balcony Suites) spanning nine passenger decks and are serviced by eight lifts.

She features wide corridors and stairways and expansive deck areas with wood type decking in many areas. In addition a wide choice of well-appointed lounges and panoramic seating coupled with observation area suited to the operator's scenic cruise programme.

CMV claim that Magellan offers a feeling of intimacy and personal attention when compared with the 'mega' resort style ships built today. They also say that there fleet have no climbing walls or ice-skating rinks and no kids!

 

Published in Cruise Liners

#CRUISE LINERS – In 2013 Cruise & Maritime Voyages are to charter Discovery (1971/20,216grt) for the UK cruising season to directly replace Ocean Countess, writes Jehan Ashmore.

The charter of the 700 passenger Discovery from Voyages of Discovery will see her operate cruises from Bristol Avonmouth, Liverpool, Hull and Harwich. As part of the charter arrangement her owners will also market the vessel during the season as Discovery Sailaway.

Discovery will undergo an extensive winter dry-docking and refurbishment programme prior to joining the CMV fleet in February 2013.

Her inaugural 'Irish' call will also mark the first cruise caller next year to Dublin Port scheduled on 8 April during a 5-night Springtime Gardens and Charms Cruise. Sharing the season will be CMV's slightly larger 800 passenger Marco Polo (1965/22,080grt).

Published in Cruising

#CRUISELINERS- Cruise & Maritime Voyages (CMV) Ocean Countess (1976/16,795grt) is scheduled to depart Dublin Port this evening, writes Jehan Ashmore.

The Portuguese flagged vessel is to start on a 14-nights "Canaries & Madeira" cruise, with Irish passengers having the opportunity to embark directly in the capital.

She is to sail overnight to Liverpool, however her first Iberian port of call to Lisbon, is not until this Friday. Fares for the fortnight cost from £1,207 sterling and the cruise was organised through John Galligan Travel.

CMV also operates another veteran with the slightly older Marco Polo (1973/19,860grt) which too is a regular visitor to the port.

Published in Cruise Liners

#CRUISE LINERS – Cruise & Maritime Voyages Marco Polo (1965/22,080grt) anchored off scenic Glengariff today and also sharing Bantry Bay is the tanker Amundsen Spirit (2010/109,290dwt), writes Jehan Ashmore.

The 800-passenger Marco Polo had sailed from Cork and the veteran vessel by coincidence has a deck named Amundsen Deck (etc).

The authority responsible for shipping traffic is Bantry Bay Harbour Commissioners, where the seasonality of the cruise callers visiting West Cork is offset by the year-round business of tankers.

Large tankers can be handled in the deep waters off the Bantry Bay Terminal on Whiddy Island. However the terminal has no jetty facilities,  instead tankers use the single-point mooring (SPM) a buoy that is anchored offshore. This system also performs in unloading cargo that is transferred through pipes feeding into the tank farm located on the island.

The tugs Ocean Bank and Trojan were attending the Amundsen Spirit (249m long X 44m beam X 14.6m draft), noting at the bow she a structure to facilitate the SPM operations.

Published in Cruise Liners

#HISTORIC LIVERPOOL CRUISECALL - Cruise & Maritime Voyages (CMV)'s Ocean Countess (1976/17,593grt) became the first turnaround cruise call in four decades after departing Liverpool on Tuesday, however the ship suffered temporary loss of engine power, forcing the vessel to turn around and divert to Holyhead, writes Jehan Ashmore.

The cruiseship with around 700 passengers had embarked during scenes of celebrations as crowds of onlookers gathered for the historic occasion at the Liverpool City Cruise Terminal. Several hours later into the first leg of an eight-night Scottish Isles cruise the incident took place while off the west coast of the Isle of Man.

With the detour to Holyhead, passengers disembarked at the Welsh port and where provided with a shore-side tour excursion programme. Incidentally the Anglesey port welcomed the vessel the previous day, as she made a scheduled call before completing the inbound turnaround at Liverpool.

CMV have scheduled a further ten turn-around cruises from Liverpool this year using the terminal that was completed in 2007 at a cost of £17m. Following Ocean Countess's inaugural turnaround, Princess Cruises considerably larger 3,000 passenger / 113,000 tonnes Caribbean Princess made a call yesterday.

The Liverpool City Cruise Terminal up until now could only accept transit calls as the facility was built with public expenditure. It was deemed otherwise unfair to compete with other leading UK ports with cruise infrastructure facilities that where not funded by the public purse.

In order for the Merseyside to accommodate turnarounds, this was made feasible as Liverpool Council agreed to repay close to €9m of a grant for the river-based terminal in addition build a baggage handling facilities.

Prior to the terminal opening, only small cruiseships could call but instead had to navigate within the dock system to Langton Dock.

Published in Cruise Liners
12th April 2012

From Falmouth to the Fjords

#CRUISE LINERS – Dublin Port's first cruise caller for this season will be Arion which today sets sail from Falmouth on an eleven night / twelve day cruise to Scotland and Norwegian fjords. The 5,888 gross tonnes cruiseship built in 1965 is to berth in the capital at Ocean Pier, writes Jehan Ashmore.

The veteran vessel which has sleek traditional lines can carry over 300 passengers and she is operated by Classic International Cruises. Her visit will be one of around 90 cruise calls scheduled to Dublin Port during this year's season which stretches to early October. The majority of these calls will be in the summer and where several ships will be making repeat port of calls.

With so many callers to Dublin Port, this brings a greater variety of vessels as evident between the Arion and Princess Cruises considerably larger Grand Princess which is due next week. The giant vessel weighs over 109,000 gross tonnes and has a capacity for over 4,000 passenger and crew.

The Portuguese flagged Arion is also set to open the season to Galway, as previously reported she is to make an anchorage call off the mid-west harbour next month.

Meanwhile following all the recent focus centred in Cobh, Cruise & Maritime Voyages Marco Polo is expected to arrive this afternoon by berthing at the town's dedicated cruiseship quayside.

Published in Cruise Liners
28th February 2012

Cruiseship Boost for Belfast

#CRUISE LINERS-Belfast Harbour looks forward to another bumper year as cruise operators are to increase by 32% compared to last year, with 41 cruise ships bringing almost 75,000 visitors to the port.

The following major operators are to visit: Cruise & Maritime Voyages, Fred Olsen Cruise Lines, Holland America Line, Princess Cruises and Saga Cruise and others will dock from far flung destinations.

At over 1km long, Stormont Wharf, will again be the main berth for cruiseships in particular the ability to accommodate an increasing trend in larger class vessels touring the Irish Sea. The wharf was extended in recent years at a cost of £10m and is the longest deepwater quay in Ireland.

To promote Belfast Harbour as a cruiseship destination, the port and the Belfast Visitor and Convention Bureau (BVCB) set up the Cruise Belfast Initiative to market the location internationally.

For further information visit www.cruise-belfast.co.uk and to view the seasons schedule of cruise callers click HERE.

Published in Cruise Liners
Page 1 of 2

About Dublin Port 

Dublin Port Company is currently investing about €277 million on its Alexandra Basin Redevelopment (ABR), which is due to be complete by 2021. The redevelopment will improve the port's capacity for large ships by deepening and lengthening 3km of its 7km of berths. The ABR is part of a €1bn capital programme up to 2028, which will also include initial work on the Dublin Port’s MP2 Project - a major capital development project proposal for works within the existing port lands in the northeastern part of the port.

Dublin Port has also recently secured planning approval for the development of the next phase of its inland port near Dublin Airport. The latest stage of the inland port will include a site with the capacity to store more than 2,000 shipping containers and infrastructures such as an ESB substation, an office building and gantry crane.

Dublin Port Company recently submitted a planning application for a €320 million project that aims to provide significant additional capacity at the facility within the port in order to cope with increases in trade up to 2040. The scheme will see a new roll-on/roll-off jetty built to handle ferries of up to 240 metres in length, as well as the redevelopment of an oil berth into a deep-water container berth.

Dublin Port FAQ

Dublin was little more than a monastic settlement until the Norse invasion in the 8th and 9th centuries when they selected the Liffey Estuary as their point of entry to the country as it provided relatively easy access to the central plains of Ireland. Trading with England and Europe followed which required port facilities, so the development of Dublin Port is inextricably linked to the development of Dublin City, so it is fair to say the origins of the Port go back over one thousand years. As a result, the modern organisation Dublin Port has a long and remarkable history, dating back over 300 years from 1707.

The original Port of Dublin was situated upriver, a few miles from its current location near the modern Civic Offices at Wood Quay and close to Christchurch Cathedral. The Port remained close to that area until the new Custom House opened in the 1790s. In medieval times Dublin shipped cattle hides to Britain and the continent, and the returning ships carried wine, pottery and other goods.

510 acres. The modern Dublin Port is located either side of the River Liffey, out to its mouth. On the north side of the river, the central part (205 hectares or 510 acres) of the Port lies at the end of East Wall and North Wall, from Alexandra Quay.

Dublin Port Company is a State-owned commercial company responsible for operating and developing Dublin Port.

Dublin Port Company is a self-financing, and profitable private limited company wholly-owned by the State, whose business is to manage Dublin Port, Ireland's premier Port. Established as a corporate entity in 1997, Dublin Port Company is responsible for the management, control, operation and development of the Port.

Captain William Bligh (of Mutiny of the Bounty fame) was a visitor to Dublin in 1800, and his visit to the capital had a lasting effect on the Port. Bligh's study of the currents in Dublin Bay provided the basis for the construction of the North Wall. This undertaking led to the growth of Bull Island to its present size.

Yes. Dublin Port is the largest freight and passenger port in Ireland. It handles almost 50% of all trade in the Republic of Ireland.

All cargo handling activities being carried out by private sector companies operating in intensely competitive markets within the Port. Dublin Port Company provides world-class facilities, services, accommodation and lands in the harbour for ships, goods and passengers.

Eamonn O'Reilly is the Dublin Port Chief Executive.

Capt. Michael McKenna is the Dublin Port Harbour Master

In 2019, 1,949,229 people came through the Port.

In 2019, there were 158 cruise liner visits.

In 2019, 9.4 million gross tonnes of exports were handled by Dublin Port.

In 2019, there were 7,898 ship arrivals.

In 2019, there was a gross tonnage of 38.1 million.

In 2019, there were 559,506 tourist vehicles.

There were 98,897 lorries in 2019

Boats can navigate the River Liffey into Dublin by using the navigational guidelines. Find the guidelines on this page here.

VHF channel 12. Commercial vessels using Dublin Port or Dun Laoghaire Port typically have a qualified pilot or certified master with proven local knowledge on board. They "listen out" on VHF channel 12 when in Dublin Port's jurisdiction.

A Dublin Bay webcam showing the south of the Bay at Dun Laoghaire and a distant view of Dublin Port Shipping is here
Dublin Port is creating a distributed museum on its lands in Dublin City.
 A Liffey Tolka Project cycle and pedestrian way is the key to link the elements of this distributed museum together.  The distributed museum starts at the Diving Bell and, over the course of 6.3km, will give Dubliners a real sense of the City, the Port and the Bay.  For visitors, it will be a unique eye-opening stroll and vista through and alongside one of Europe’s busiest ports:  Diving Bell along Sir John Rogerson’s Quay over the Samuel Beckett Bridge, past the Scherzer Bridge and down the North Wall Quay campshire to Berth 18 - 1.2 km.   Liffey Tolka Project - Tree-lined pedestrian and cycle route between the River Liffey and the Tolka Estuary - 1.4 km with a 300-metre spur along Alexandra Road to The Pumphouse (to be completed by Q1 2021) and another 200 metres to The Flour Mill.   Tolka Estuary Greenway - Construction of Phase 1 (1.9 km) starts in December 2020 and will be completed by Spring 2022.  Phase 2 (1.3 km) will be delivered within the following five years.  The Pumphouse is a heritage zone being created as part of the Alexandra Basin Redevelopment Project.  The first phase of 1.6 acres will be completed in early 2021 and will include historical port equipment and buildings and a large open space for exhibitions and performances.  It will be expanded in a subsequent phase to incorporate the Victorian Graving Dock No. 1 which will be excavated and revealed. 
 The largest component of the distributed museum will be The Flour Mill.  This involves the redevelopment of the former Odlums Flour Mill on Alexandra Road based on a masterplan completed by Grafton Architects to provide a mix of port operational uses, a National Maritime Archive, two 300 seat performance venues, working and studio spaces for artists and exhibition spaces.   The Flour Mill will be developed in stages over the remaining twenty years of Masterplan 2040 alongside major port infrastructure projects.

Source: Dublin Port Company ©Afloat 2020. 

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