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Displaying items by tag: Cruise Liners

#CruiseRosslare - Afloat’s tracking of known Irish Sea timber-trading cargoships recently led to Rosslare, synonymous for its ferries, is to welcome more business with a first cruise call in more than two decades, writes Jehan Ashmore.

In early July the honour of this inaugural cruise call will go to Fred Olsen Cruise Lines Braemar with more than 900 visiting passengers. The  24,344 tonnes vessel is to dock within the harbour and remain in port for up to 12 hours.

Last year Pheonix Reisen's similar capacity cruiseship Albatros which has a deeper draft was scheduled to anchor offshore. The call however was cancelled due to bad weather conditions preventing anchoring and tendering visitors ashore. To read more click here.

The call by Braemar this summer will be more keenly awaited by Rosslare Europort, where the harbour authority is unique for an Irish port in that it is operated by Irish Rail (Iarnród Éireann).

In addition the cruise call is to boost the season for businesses notably running visitor attractions in the ‘model’ county and that of Wexford town.

As reported previously on Afloat, Braemar took part in Fred Olsen's first ever fleet gathering to one port and all at the same time. The event took place in Bergen last year where the origins of Fred Olsen date back to 1848.

Since 1987 the operator have concentrated cruises departing from UK ports, through Southampton, Liverpool, Newcastle, Dover, Tilbury, Harwich and Falmouth.

Published in Cruise Liners

#KeynoteSpeaker - Carnival UK's chairman David Dingle, will be the keynote speaker at the Cruise Europe Conference (CEC) in Dublin next month. He will present the ‘State of the Industry in Europe’ on the morning of May 31.

Dublin Port Company recently launched Cruise Dublin, a cruise development and marketing agency, in March. It will work with its members from retail outlets, visitor experiences and tourism bodies to promote Dublin. Cruise tourism is growing at 20% a year.

Pat Ward, head of corporate services DPC, said: “We want to promote Dublin as a premium cruise destination directly to cruise companies and work with businesses in Dublin to tailor packages to the needs of the cruiselines and their passengers.”

For passengers who want to explore on their own a Cruise Dublin Visitor Card is being developed.

Published in Cruise Liners

#CruiseIOM - The Isle of Man Government last year appointed Neptumar (IOM) Ltd, a subsidiary of Dohle (IOM) Ltd, as its cruise consultant as part of a new strategy to drive forward cruise business in the Isle of Man.

According to Cruise Europe, bookings for 2016 are looking good with 19 vessels expected to call at the Isle of Man, either at anchorage or alongside at the Victoria Pier which can take vessels up to 155m in length.

As part of the new strategy the Isle of Man is reviewing its harbour facilities and has planned some upgrades this year to the Victoria Pier, including the fenders, to make berthing more comfortable for visiting cruise vessels.

Routine maintenance and upgrade to the Douglas Sea Terminal will also take place and this year there will be a retail outlet in the welcome centre selling Manx produce and local crafts.

The Vikings are set to dominate the Isle of Man in 2016 with exhibitions hosted by Manx National Heritage, the organisation responsible for protecting and promoting the Isle of Man’s heritage and culture. Many of these sites feature in shore excursions.

On arrival passengers will see the Tower of Refuge which was built on the reef in 1832 following several shipwrecks. Sir William Hillary, who helped to found the Royal National Lifeboat Institution, ordered the construction because he wanted a refuge for survivors until help could arrive.

Published in Cruise Liners

#CruiseEurope – Cruise Europe which has members from within northern and Atlantic Europe will be hosting the organisation’s annual conference in Dublin as previously reported on Afloat. This will be the first time the capital has hosted the major industry sector event.

More than 200 delegates from across Europe will gather for the Cruise Europe Conference between May 31 to June 2 at the Gibson Hotel located in the Point Village. The venue neighbours the port site to where a dedicated purpose built €30m cruise terminal, another first for Dublin was granted permission last year.

The double-cruise berth facility is part of the €230m Alexandra Basin Redevelopment project will be able to handle the world's top ten largest cruise liners, including the 360m long Allure of the Seas.

“We have a great line-up of speakers,” said Jens Skrede, managing director CE, who announced the participation of Miguel Reyna, director commercial development Royal Caribbean Cruises Ltd; Russell Daya, executive director global port operations & developments, itinerary and strategic planning Disney Cruise Line; and Clare Ward, senior commercial planning manager Fred Olsen Cruise Lines. Jens added that “more speakers will be announced later”.

Nigel Lingard will once again moderate the event and there will be plenty of time to network during the social events. After the AGM on Tuesday, there will be an open-top bus tour of the city which will end up at the Guinness Storehouse for a tour, informal dinner and entertainment like only the Irish know how.

The gala evening will take place after the main conference on Wednesday. It will be held at the stunning Royal Hospital Kilmainham which has been a place of caring since 1680.

Published in Cruise Liners

#SuperSized - A berth for “super-sized” cruise ships in Dun Laoghaire Harbour could still be provided in spite of the introduction of a development plan which blocks their entry to the harbour.

Councillors have inserted a provision in the new county development plan to limit the size of vessels that can enter the harbour to 250m. However, the move may not be enough to topple a planning application from Dún Laoghaire Harbour Company for a new cruise berth.

In a vote on the county development plan on Wednesday, councillors agreed to “preserve the integrity, natural beauty and historical significance of the harbour by protecting this central area from any cruise berth that would allow cruise ships longer than 250m to come directly into the harbour”.

For more The Irish Times has the story here.

#ShorePower - Hurtigruten has announced plans to modify several of its vessels for shore power during first half of 2016.

The initiative follows a stronger environmental focus in the Norwegian company, which operates a fleet of 13 explorer vessels among them the new MS Spitsbergen. The shore power installation will significantly reduce fuel consumption and air pollution during port calls.

The company has signed an agreement of intent with the port of Bergen for development of the land-based shore power equipment – and is encouraging other ports to follow.

Initially, three vessels operating the Norwegian coast are being modified to connect to shore power installations during port calls. The first ship to be prepared for shore power is MS Kong Harald, which is currently being refurbished at Norway’s Fosen Yard.

Throughout the first half of 2016, another two vessels will have shore power installed, with the ambition to modify three more ships.

“To succeed with the green shift at sea, maritime stakeholders must commit to the objective, and cooperate. Cruise lines, ports, tech industry and politicians must pull in the same direction. A combination of incentives and regulations must guide the development of a greener industry. Shore power should be equally available in ports as the fenders are. We hope our initiative is met by quick actions in other Norwegian ports in addition to Bergen”, says Hurtigruten CEO Daniel Skjeldam.

Hurtigruten is continuously striving to reduce fuel consumption and greenhouse gas emissions from its operations. In addition to the shore power initiative, several other measures have been implemented the last years.

Shore power in Bergen, where the Hurtigruten ships are at berth for 8 hours daily during winter and 5, 5 hours during summer, will reduce CO2 emissions annually by almost 130 tons per ship. An annual reduction of NOx is estimated to approximately 2.5 tons.

Published in Cruise Liners

#CruiseshipLimit - The Irish Times reports that Dún Laoghaire-Rathdown councillors move to limit the size of cruise ships allowed to berth in Dún Laoghaire harbour – effectively banning “supersized” cruise ships – has been opposed by council management.

Members of the local authority voted two-to-one last December to ban cruise ships in excess of 250m long in the local authority’s drafting of the county development plan.

However, in a management response to submissions on the plan the authority’s chief executive Philomena Poole said the ban should be deleted.

Ms Poole’s comments were circulated to councillors on Tuesday. Councillors will get a final vote on whether to include the ban when the development plan is adopted, expected to be in February.

While the management report on the councillors’ proposed prohibition notes a large number of submissions in favour of the proposal, Ms Poole said the harbour was already a protected structure and does not need the additional protection of the ban.

The chief executive’s opposition is significant as Dún Laoghaire Harbour Company has applied to An Bord Pleanála for permission for a cruise berth facility of almost 400m and significant dredging inside and outside the harbour walls.

To read more and about the transfer of the harbour to local authority control in accordance to the Harbours Bill, please click here.

#CruiseLiners- Cruise Belfast has announced that 2016 will be the busiest season in the city’s history with over 145,000 passengers and crew due to visit, representing a 26% increase in visitor numbers compared with 2015.

Several cruise operators have significantly increased the number of times they plan to call at Belfast this year. UK based Cruise & Maritime Voyages is scheduled to call a total of eight times following the successful single call of its cruise ship the MV Magellan in 2015.

Fred Olsen Cruise Line has also increased the number of its calls from seven in 2015 to a total of 11 visits in 2016.

The larger ships are also strongly represented with US based Princess Cruises continuing to show strong support for Belfast and Northern Ireland with a total of 11 large cruise ships due to call carrying a total of 53,000 visitors.

Belfast Harbour will play host to 81 cruise calls in 2016, carrying passengers from around the world with the cruise industry’s best known operators once again scheduling Belfast including Princess Cruise, Celebrity Cruise and P&O.

Joe O’Neill, Belfast Harbour’s Commercial Director, said: “This is a fantastic announcement for Northern Ireland’s tourism industry with thousands of first time visitors getting the chance to sample the region’s great scenery, attractions, warm welcome and hospitality. In the past 5 years we have almost doubled the number of cruise ships calling into Belfast which is a major achievement and a tremendous vote of confidence in Northern Ireland’s tourism offer. Most of the major lines operating in western Europe now call at Belfast and it’s particularly pleasing that year on year they have increased the number of calls they make to the city.”

Gerry Lennon, Chief Executive of Visit Belfast added: “The huge popularity of world class attractions such as Titanic Belfast and Giant’s Causeway coupled with the international appeal of Game of Thrones and our world-class golf courses is helping profile Northern Ireland’s appeal as a destination, and the feedback from cruise operators is that Belfast remains one of their passengers’ most popular ports of call. Visit Belfast will continue to work with Belfast Harbour and the city’s tourism providers to ensure that passengers have every opportunity to see the very best that Belfast has to offer.”

Among the ships calling next year will be Cunard’s Queen Elizabeth, launched in 2010 at a cost of £350m. The largest vessel due is Princess Cruise’s Regal Princess with 5,100 passengers and crew, whilst the smallest will be All Leisure’s Hebridean Princess with just 74. The first visitor will be the MV Astoria in March as part of a British Isles cruise.

August 2016 will be the city’s busiest cruise month ever with 26 calls expected. During the year there will also be a number of cruises embarking from the port.

In recent years cruise lines operating western European itineraries have been introducing larger and longer vessels which require deeper channels and additional quay space. To accommodate these next-generation cruise ships and the increased popularity of Belfast, Belfast Harbour has plans to develop a new, dedicated cruise facility.

Published in Cruise Liners

#Cruiseliners – An extra cruiseship is to visit Dun Laoghaire Harbour, since Afloat reported the end of the 2015 season marked by the maiden anchorage call of Mein Schiff 4, writes Jehan Ashmore.

The additional cruiseship, Celebrity Silhouette brings to eight in total to call during 2016. The 122,400 tonnes 'Soltice' class ship is to anchor off Dun Laoghaire in July and only because Dublin Port cannot accept the vessel due to unsuitable tides.

The Celebrity Cruises ship however will make three visits to Dublin Port throughout this season, for more click here. The port will be capable of handling much larger cruiseships following permission granted last year for a new cruise terminal.  

As for Dun Laoghaire Harbour, there is insufficient depth for larger cruiseships to dock inside the harbour and this led to plans lodged by Dun Laoghaire Harbour Company for a €18m cruise-berth. A decision to grant or deny planning permission by An Bord Pleanala was delayed earlier this month and they announced that a final ruling on the controversial project may take months to reach conclusion. 

Celebrity Silhouette with a 2,886 passenger capacity will be a boost for Dun Laoghaire Harbour to where previously the German build cruiseship also made a maiden offshore call to the port last July.

Of the eight cruiseships for the 2016 season all ships have visited Dun Laoghaire Harbour before.

In the past five years the most frequent caller has been the sail-assisted Wind Surf. The four-mast cruiseship is scheduled to make 2 of the eight calls this season and dock within the harbour alongside Carlisle Pier.

To consult arrival and departures times for the cruiseships calling to Dun Laoghaire Harbour, click here in addition to those also scheduled to the port for the following season of 2017. 

#CruiseLinersDublin - A major cruise conference being held in Dublin later this year as previously reported on Afloat, is expected to significantly bolster the number of cruise liners visiting this country.

The Irish Examiner writes that Cruise Europe, an organisation representing 120 ports and associate members on the continent, is to hold its annual three-day conference in the capital in June.

Cruise Europe’s goal is to have cruise companies, ports and likely destinations working together in a unified manner to ensure safe and enhanced experiences for cruise passengers.

Chairman of Cruise Europe, Captain Michael McCarthy — who is also commercial manager of the Port of Cork — said he is excited at the prospect of Dublin Port hosting the conference. He said it was a great opportunity to showcase Ireland to the cruise industry. To read more, click here.

Published in Cruise Liners
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About Dublin Port 

Dublin Port is Ireland’s largest and busiest port with approximately 17,000 vessel movements per year. As well as being the country’s largest port, Dublin Port has the highest rate of growth and, in the seven years to 2019, total cargo volumes grew by 36.1%.

The vision of Dublin Port Company is to have the required capacity to service the needs of its customers and the wider economy safely, efficiently and sustainably. Dublin Port will integrate with the City by enhancing the natural and built environments. The Port is being developed in line with Masterplan 2040.

Dublin Port Company is currently investing about €277 million on its Alexandra Basin Redevelopment (ABR), which is due to be complete by 2021. The redevelopment will improve the port's capacity for large ships by deepening and lengthening 3km of its 7km of berths. The ABR is part of a €1bn capital programme up to 2028, which will also include initial work on the Dublin Port’s MP2 Project - a major capital development project proposal for works within the existing port lands in the northeastern part of the port.

Dublin Port has also recently secured planning approval for the development of the next phase of its inland port near Dublin Airport. The latest stage of the inland port will include a site with the capacity to store more than 2,000 shipping containers and infrastructures such as an ESB substation, an office building and gantry crane.

Dublin Port Company recently submitted a planning application for a €320 million project that aims to provide significant additional capacity at the facility within the port in order to cope with increases in trade up to 2040. The scheme will see a new roll-on/roll-off jetty built to handle ferries of up to 240 metres in length, as well as the redevelopment of an oil berth into a deep-water container berth.

Dublin Port FAQ

Dublin was little more than a monastic settlement until the Norse invasion in the 8th and 9th centuries when they selected the Liffey Estuary as their point of entry to the country as it provided relatively easy access to the central plains of Ireland. Trading with England and Europe followed which required port facilities, so the development of Dublin Port is inextricably linked to the development of Dublin City, so it is fair to say the origins of the Port go back over one thousand years. As a result, the modern organisation Dublin Port has a long and remarkable history, dating back over 300 years from 1707.

The original Port of Dublin was situated upriver, a few miles from its current location near the modern Civic Offices at Wood Quay and close to Christchurch Cathedral. The Port remained close to that area until the new Custom House opened in the 1790s. In medieval times Dublin shipped cattle hides to Britain and the continent, and the returning ships carried wine, pottery and other goods.

510 acres. The modern Dublin Port is located either side of the River Liffey, out to its mouth. On the north side of the river, the central part (205 hectares or 510 acres) of the Port lies at the end of East Wall and North Wall, from Alexandra Quay.

Dublin Port Company is a State-owned commercial company responsible for operating and developing Dublin Port.

Dublin Port Company is a self-financing, and profitable private limited company wholly-owned by the State, whose business is to manage Dublin Port, Ireland's premier Port. Established as a corporate entity in 1997, Dublin Port Company is responsible for the management, control, operation and development of the Port.

Captain William Bligh (of Mutiny of the Bounty fame) was a visitor to Dublin in 1800, and his visit to the capital had a lasting effect on the Port. Bligh's study of the currents in Dublin Bay provided the basis for the construction of the North Wall. This undertaking led to the growth of Bull Island to its present size.

Yes. Dublin Port is the largest freight and passenger port in Ireland. It handles almost 50% of all trade in the Republic of Ireland.

All cargo handling activities being carried out by private sector companies operating in intensely competitive markets within the Port. Dublin Port Company provides world-class facilities, services, accommodation and lands in the harbour for ships, goods and passengers.

Eamonn O'Reilly is the Dublin Port Chief Executive.

Capt. Michael McKenna is the Dublin Port Harbour Master

In 2019, 1,949,229 people came through the Port.

In 2019, there were 158 cruise liner visits.

In 2019, 9.4 million gross tonnes of exports were handled by Dublin Port.

In 2019, there were 7,898 ship arrivals.

In 2019, there was a gross tonnage of 38.1 million.

In 2019, there were 559,506 tourist vehicles.

There were 98,897 lorries in 2019

Boats can navigate the River Liffey into Dublin by using the navigational guidelines. Find the guidelines on this page here.

VHF channel 12. Commercial vessels using Dublin Port or Dun Laoghaire Port typically have a qualified pilot or certified master with proven local knowledge on board. They "listen out" on VHF channel 12 when in Dublin Port's jurisdiction.

A Dublin Bay webcam showing the south of the Bay at Dun Laoghaire and a distant view of Dublin Port Shipping is here
Dublin Port is creating a distributed museum on its lands in Dublin City.
 A Liffey Tolka Project cycle and pedestrian way is the key to link the elements of this distributed museum together.  The distributed museum starts at the Diving Bell and, over the course of 6.3km, will give Dubliners a real sense of the City, the Port and the Bay.  For visitors, it will be a unique eye-opening stroll and vista through and alongside one of Europe’s busiest ports:  Diving Bell along Sir John Rogerson’s Quay over the Samuel Beckett Bridge, past the Scherzer Bridge and down the North Wall Quay campshire to Berth 18 - 1.2 km.   Liffey Tolka Project - Tree-lined pedestrian and cycle route between the River Liffey and the Tolka Estuary - 1.4 km with a 300-metre spur along Alexandra Road to The Pumphouse (to be completed by Q1 2021) and another 200 metres to The Flour Mill.   Tolka Estuary Greenway - Construction of Phase 1 (1.9 km) starts in December 2020 and will be completed by Spring 2022.  Phase 2 (1.3 km) will be delivered within the following five years.  The Pumphouse is a heritage zone being created as part of the Alexandra Basin Redevelopment Project.  The first phase of 1.6 acres will be completed in early 2021 and will include historical port equipment and buildings and a large open space for exhibitions and performances.  It will be expanded in a subsequent phase to incorporate the Victorian Graving Dock No. 1 which will be excavated and revealed. 
 The largest component of the distributed museum will be The Flour Mill.  This involves the redevelopment of the former Odlums Flour Mill on Alexandra Road based on a masterplan completed by Grafton Architects to provide a mix of port operational uses, a National Maritime Archive, two 300 seat performance venues, working and studio spaces for artists and exhibition spaces.   The Flour Mill will be developed in stages over the remaining twenty years of Masterplan 2040 alongside major port infrastructure projects.

Source: Dublin Port Company ©Afloat 2020. 

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