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Displaying items by tag: Dun Laoghaire Harbour

Dun Laoghaire RNLI launched both their lifeboat’s this afternoon (Tuesday 11 August) at the request of the Irish Coast Guard assisting two vessels in two separate incidents.

At 12:55 pm today, the all-weather lifeboat was launched under Coxswain Mark McGibney with a crew to reports of a yacht which had suffered steering failure two miles north of Greystones in County Wicklow. A local vessel, ‘Centurion’, sighted and confirmed the casualty vessel’s location. The volunteer crew made their way to the scene arriving at 1:21 pm and on arrival, the lifeboat crew assessed the situation. The person on board was in good health and the stricken yacht was taken in tow to Dun Laoghaire Harbour.

As the all-weather lifeboat was on its way back to Dun Laoghaire Harbour the station’s inshore lifeboat was also requested to launch at 2:06 pm to a separate incident just outside the entrance to Dun Laoghaire Harbour. A report was received from the Irish Coast Guard of five people on a 23ft yacht with engine failure. The inshore lifeboat crew swiftly located the vessel arriving on scene at 2:14 pm, having assessed that all on board were in good health the volunteer crew took the yacht in tow bringing it into Dun Laoghaire Harbour arriving at 2:45 pm. The station’s all-weather lifeboat crew arriving after shortly after, at 3:00 pm.

Weather conditions at the time of both callouts were described as calm with a light wind with restricted visibility due to fog.

Dun Laoghaire Harbour RNLI Coxswain Mark McGibneyDun Laoghaire Harbour RNLI Coxswain Mark McGibney

Speaking following the call out, Mark McGibney, Dun Laoghaire RNLI lifeboat Coxswain said: ‘The people in both incidents made the right decision in calling the Irish Coast Guard for help. Conditions today were calm on scene but visibility was restricted by fog, thank you to the crew of the local vessel, Centurion for sighting and confirming the vessel’s location which allowed us to respond with no delay’.

Also speaking alongside Mark McGibney following the callouts was Gary Hayes, Dun Laoghaire RNLI inshore lifeboat Helm, he said’ The volunteer crew and I are very happy to have returned everyone safely to shore today. I’d like to take this opportunity to ask everybody thinking of going out on the water to please check their vessel and safety equipment in advance’.

Published in RNLI Lifeboats

The new RS Aero fleet now comprises the biggest one-design class, racing in the DBSC PY fleet. From zero boats last year in DBSC, there are now six Aeros racing competitively and there are rumours of more boats on the way. Not only are the boats great in one design but also have demonstrated great handicap ability under the PY system with five of the Aeros holding the top 5 places overall in the Tuesday Series with Noel Butler in the lead and Brendan Foley’s Aero leading overall in the Saturday Series.

Last night saw Noel Butler win both windward/leeward races showing excellent upwind speed and good race management to avoid the bunching on the short harbour based course. The rest of the boats traded places in the shifty winds with lightweight flyer ‘Skinny’ Sarah Dwyer and athletic Stephen Oram showing excellent speed, almost match racing each other around the track.

RS Aero DBSC racing at Dun Laoghaire HarbourRS Aero DBSC racing at Dun Laoghaire Harbour Photo: Afloat

What is amazing is the variety of sailing styles witnessed as the fleet learn to sail the boats quicker. The high/low modes upwind can have huge gains or losses and being only 30 kilos heavy the boats really respond well to the small gusts with excellent acceleration. Downwind the boats run more by-the-lee than the Finns and the Lasers with some sailors choosing the big windward heel and others going flat to keep the chines out of the water.

The training clinics of Maurice ‘Prof’ O’Connell over the last few months have helped the fleet to come on with his knowledge and drills supporting the rise in the standard.

One of the features of the Aero class is sharing knowledge and the Dun Laoghaire Harbour fleet is no different with race winners sharing what worked and didn’t - the net effect has been a great rise in overall standard with any of the 6 boats capable of a top 3 placing.

This augers well for the RS Aero Irish Open Championship being held on the 19th and 20th of September 2020 at the INSC in Dun Laoghaire.

If you would like to sail an Aero and try it out ask any of the sailors with boats in the NYC or RStGYC. The class plan to have some open days for a try-out within COVID guidelines in the next few months.

Published in RS Aero

At the start of COVID 19 pandemic, the sailing community in Dun Laoghaire began planning for one event to replace the four individual waterfront yacht club regattas.

The original regatta plan had two potential dates July 31st/ August 1st - or Sept. 5/6th. The event is an initiative of all five of Dun Laoghaire's yacht clubs as a response to the COVID-19 interrupted season.

In the light of recent delay to Phase 4 of reopening, the later date is being chosen and an event is being designed to meet the COVID-19 protocols.

The event will be hosted by the National Yacht Club who are celebrating their 150th year.

It is being supported by the other Clubs – RIYC, RSGYC and DMYC, whose members will take part.

In what is turning out to be a bumper September for Irish sailing, the event will run a fortnight after the Round Ireland Race from Wicklow (August 22nd) and a week before the ICRA National Championships at Howth as part of the North Dublin Club's WAVE regatta on 11/13 September.

National Yacht Club Commodore Martin McCarthyNational Yacht Club Commodore Martin McCarthy

The event will also have a trophy to mark 100 years since the renaming of the town to Dun Laoghaire and will be supported by Davy Group who will provide prizes and support.

National YC Commodore, Martin McCarthy commented: “We are thrilled that the other clubs have so generously given us the opportunity to celebrate our 150th with a Regatta, in a year where sailing time has been very condensed. The event is being designed to meet the requirements of the battle against COVID 19, so Apres Sail will be restricted.

National Yacht Club 150th logo

"We will have 10 Commemorative medals struck for race winners across the waterfront and a singular trophy to mark 100 years of Dun Laoghaire for the finest Classic boat taking part".

"We especially thank Davy Group whose loyalty and ongoing sponsorship during this pandemic has contributed greatly to running this event.
It will be an important step on the road to “new normal” and which we hope will finish with a rowing race in Dublin Bay".

At 10:21 am today (Saturday 18 July), Dublin Coast Guard requested Dun Laoghaire Harbour RNLI to assist three people on board a 35ft yacht which had its propeller fouled approximately two miles of the Dublin coast.

The all-weather lifeboat was launched under Coxswain Mark McGibney with six crew onboard and made its way to the scene arriving at 10:55 am. The all-weather lifeboat took the vessel in tow and brought it to Dun Laoghaire Harbour arriving at 12:00 pm.

Weather conditions at the time were described as good with a slight wind and good visibility.

Speaking following the call out, Mark McGibney, Dun Laoghaire RNLI lifeboat Coxswain said: ‘This can happen to anyone but it’s great to see the people involved wearing lifejackets and have the correct means of communication to call the Irish Coast Guard for help, which was the case today. I’d like to take this opportunity to ask everyone to make sure that their vessel engines and safety equipment are checked and in working order before taking to the water.’

Dun Laoghaire RNLI Take Motorboat Under Tow

It was the second shout for leisure boats this week for the Dun Laoghaire lifeboat crew. On Wednesday the all-weather lifeboat was called to assist a 35-motorboat off the County Wicklow coast at Bray as pictured below

Dun Laoghaire RNLI tow a motoboat back to the harbour Photo: AfloatDun Laoghaire RNLI tow a motorboat back to the harbour Photo: Afloat

Published in RNLI Lifeboats

We think of the venerable Dublin Bay Water Wags as being the quintessential Dun Laoghaire Harbour class. But when the results of their first race of the delayed 2020 season yesterday (Wednesday) evening were analysed, it was noted that the top performers in the turnout of 13 gleaming varnished classic boats included many from outside the leafy confines of South Dublin.

Former Olympian and current classic boat pace-setter Cathy MacAleavey was unable to race owing to having had a hip replaced on Monday (we wish her well), but she made sure her boat, No 42 Molly, was in with a chance through being raced by Olympians Finn Lynch (originally of Blessington SC) and her daughter Annalise Murphy (NYC), Silver Medallist in the 2016 Rio Olympics.

Sailing is really going again when the Water Wags make their first appearance – William Prentice’s Tortoise (42), Adan Winkelmann (46) and the O’Driscolls from Lough Derg (15) in perfect first race sailing conditionsSailing is really going again when the Water Wags make their first appearance – William Prentice’s Tortoise (42), Adan Winkelmann (46) and the O’Driscolls from Lough Derg (15) in perfect first race sailing conditions

The 1915-built Barbara (Ian & Judith Malcolm), crossed the in-harbour line to take fourth The 1915-built Barbara (Ian & Judith Malcolm), crossed the in-harbour line to take fourth

The hotshots duly obliged by winning, but the top placings thereafter indicated that interest in Water Wag racing is at the very least a Leinster-wide matter, for although Guy KIlroy of Dun Laoghaire was second with Swift, he’s no stranger to the more remote hidden waters of the North Shannon, while third was also Shannon-oriented, as the O’Driscoll family of Lough Derg YC – noted Shannon One Design sailors – have added a Water Wag to their boat portfolio. To make the spread complete, fourth place was snatched by “the Howth boat”, the 1915-built Barbara campaigned by Ian and Judith Malcolm, who are best known for their links to the Howth 17 class and other classics from the board of their local designer Herbert Boyd.

The classic Water Wag image to launch the 2020 season  - Adrian Masterson brings his boat to the mark. The classic Water Wag image to launch the 2020 season - Adrian Masterson brings his boat to the mark.

Published in Water Wag

Dun Laoghaire’s local authority has extended the deadline to take part in its summer flag-making initiative.

As previously reported on Afloat.ie, locals of all ages are invited tell their own Covid-19 story with a flag of their own making.

Submitted flags will then be flown from the masts of boats among Dun Laoghaire’s sailing community which will display them in a flotilla on Dublin Bay.

Hundreds of flags have already been received by Dun Laoghaire-Rathdown County Council, but the authority said there are lots more stories to tell so they have pushed the deadline back to the end of summer.

For more details on how to take part and create your own flag, click HERE.

Published in Dublin Bay

A new cycle lane at Dun Laoghaire Harbour runs across the primary access route for the town's RNLI Lifeboats, one of the busiest stations in the country and restricts the lifesaving service in its emergency response, according to the Dun Laoghaire RNLI.

The new scheme, currently under construction, also blocks the direct route to the National Yacht Club (NYC) at the town's East Pier.

Mr Stephen Wynne, the Lifeboat Operations Manager at RNLI Dun Laoghaire told Afloat the lifesaving charity was currently 'in consultation with DLRCoCo to find an amicable solution'.

The traffic management plan includes road closures as part of an overall plan to implement a cycle lane through the town to the popular Forty Foot bathing place in nearby Sandycove.

An artist's impression of the new 'DLR Coastal Mobility intervention' at Queens Road as envisioned by DLRCoCoAn artist's impression of the new 'DLR Coastal Mobility intervention' at Queens Road as envisioned by DLRCoCo

Access from Queen's Road 'is the primary access route used by volunteer lifeboat crew in the provision of its 24/7 lifesaving service and it is restricted as a result' Mr Wynne says.

Access to the NYC and the lifeboat station is now via the harbour roundabout at the nearby Royal St. George Yacht Club but already, at certain times of the day, new road markings at the roundabout are restricting traffic flow, according to harbour users.

DLRCoCo has also relocated its weekend markets from the Peoples Park to Queens Road between Park Road and the entrance to the Pavilion car park resulting in the road closure to all but pedestrians and cyclists.

New road markings at Dun Laoghaire Harbour roundaboutNew road markings at Dun Laoghaire Harbour roundabout Photo: Afloat

As a result, it means RNLI crews responding to an emergency call-out and travelling by car are effectively blocked coming from the east and potentially severely restricted arriving from the west depending on the time of day.

A spokesman for the NYC said the club – the Irish yacht club of the year in 2018 – had 'no comment' to make in relation to the scheme.

The cycling schemes form part of the County-wide plan of temporary measures to address the challenges in the public realm resulting from Covid-19 related to public health and safety, mobility and to support the recovery of the local economy. The Council says on its website there have been high increases in cycling numbers on routes along the coastline in May 2020, according to real-time data from cycle counters. When compared with May 2019, cycling numbers in Blackrock Park almost doubled, rising from over 16,385 cyclists to 29,666 cyclists over the month of May.

A request for comment from DLRCoCo was not responded to by the time of publication.

UPDATE: July 17. DLRCoCo response as follows:

In response to Covid-19, Dún Laoghaire-Rathdown County Council (DLRCC) has made safety-critical changes to the layout of the roads infrastructure on roads on the coastal route between Blackrock and Sandycove to reallocate road space so as to protect the health and safety of the significantly increased numbers of cyclists and pedestrians who are accessing the coastal route.

There has been an almost 100% increase in the number of cyclists using the coastal route. According to real-time data from cycle counters in Blackrock Park in May 2020 there were 29,666 cyclists compared with 16,385 cyclists in May 2019. A very distinct pattern has emerged during the Covid-19 restrictions with a wide variety of ages and abilities observed to be cycling on the road.

DLRCC as a local authority and a road authority has a duty of care to all road users, particularly vulnerable road users such as cyclists and pedestrians, and the mobility interventions, including the provision of a 2-way segregated cycle way, have necessitated changes to the road layout along Queen’s Road and in the Harbour area. In order to avoid a conflict between cyclists on the 2-way cycle way and vehicles, it was deemed necessary from a safety perspective to prevent access to vehicles via the access point in the Harbour closest to the East Pier. However, there are still clear vehicle access routes through to the RNLI lifeboat station in the Harbour via the Marine Road/Crofton Road junction and at York Road/Crofton Road junction, via the Cold Quay Bridge.

DLRCC has met on a number of occasions with RNLI representatives about the plans for the mobility interventions on Queen’s Road and in the Harbour area and plans further engagement so as to ensure that DLRCC as a road authority and RNLI as a lifesaving charity can meet their respective safety-critical responsibilities.

The dlr CoCo Markets was located on a trial basis on Queens Road on 12th July but this will not continue and the Market will be relocated to nearby locations which means that Queens Road will be open to vehicular traffic under the new one-way system during the week and at weekends.

Graffiti continues to be a problem for Dun Laoghaire's heritage harbour with extensive ugly, anti-social daubs on the walls of the pier and its disused buildings on the West Pier Head.

Expert advice on an economic plan for the harbour on Dublin Bay is being sought by Dun Laoghaire Rathdown County Council on a future direction for the harbour that is a national monument.

As Afloat reported last month, the Victorian Harbour has not escaped the vandalism of graffiti 'artists' this summer. Unoccupied cut-stone buildings on the town's West Pier were blighted by the spray can in June and although it was promptly removed, the seaward side of the building has now also been defaced.

The council says graffiti poses a significant problem throughout the Dun Laoghaire area. To report graffiti, contact 01 2054817 or email [email protected]

Tagged under

A 'Red Bull' tribute to Front Line COVID-19 pandemic staff took place over Dublin Bay this afternoon leaving massive heart shapes in the sky over Dun Laoghaire Harbour.

The Red Bull Flyover Project was originally planned for the Bay at 1 pm but instead took place three hours later at 4 pm in fine but cloudy weather.

Two Red Bull formation aircraft operated offshore, east of Poolbeg chimneys and south towards Dun Laoghaire Harbour, generating approx ten hearts.

Two safety RIBs were positioned offshore as well as a Dublin Port Pilot boat to provide support for the stunt.

Heartfelt: Red Bull stunt planes make shapes in the sky over Dublin as a tribute to COVID-19 front line staffHeartfelt: Red Bull stunt planes make shapes in the sky over Dublin as a tribute to COVID-19 front line staff

Published in Dun Laoghaire Marina

Tuesday evening Dublin Bay Sailing Club (DBSC) dinghy racing got off to a great start in Dun Laoghaire Harbour tonight with a bumper Laser fleet competing.

As Laser Class Captain Gavan Murphy predicted on Afloat a fortnight ago, there was a super turn out of single-handers for the first race of the COVID delayed season. 

The 50-boat Laser fleet enjoyed ten-knot southerly winds for the in harbour racing run from DBSC's Freebird Committee Boat.

Also racing were RS Aeros, Fireballs and PY dinghies.

DBSC Laser Racing at Dun Laoghaire HarbourPart of the 65-strong DBSC Laser fleet

DBSC Results for 30/06/2020

All results Provisional & Subject to Review

Race 1

PY Class: 1. B Sweeney, 2. N Butler, 3. B Foley

Fireball: 1. F Miller, 2. 14865, 3. N Miller

Laser Standard: 1. R Wallace, 2. D Maloney, 3. R O'Leary

Laser Radial: 1. M Norman, 2. R Geraghty-McDonnell, 3. K O'Connor

Laser 4.7: 1. A Daly, 2. C Byrne, 3. H Turvey

Race 2

PY Class: 1. B Sweeney, 2. N Butler, 3. B Foley

Fireball: 1. F Miller, 2. C Power/M Barry, 3. 14865

Laser Standard: 1. R Wallace, 2. R O'Leary, 3. G O'Hare

Laser Radial: 1. P O'Reilly, 2. K O'Connor, 3. R Geraghty-McDonnell

Laser 4.7: 1. A Daly, 2. E Dempsey, 3. Z Hall

 

Published in DBSC
Page 9 of 34

About Dublin Port 

Dublin Port is Ireland’s largest and busiest port with approximately 17,000 vessel movements per year. As well as being the country’s largest port, Dublin Port has the highest rate of growth and, in the seven years to 2019, total cargo volumes grew by 36.1%.

The vision of Dublin Port Company is to have the required capacity to service the needs of its customers and the wider economy safely, efficiently and sustainably. Dublin Port will integrate with the City by enhancing the natural and built environments. The Port is being developed in line with Masterplan 2040.

Dublin Port Company is currently investing about €277 million on its Alexandra Basin Redevelopment (ABR), which is due to be complete by 2021. The redevelopment will improve the port's capacity for large ships by deepening and lengthening 3km of its 7km of berths. The ABR is part of a €1bn capital programme up to 2028, which will also include initial work on the Dublin Port’s MP2 Project - a major capital development project proposal for works within the existing port lands in the northeastern part of the port.

Dublin Port has also recently secured planning approval for the development of the next phase of its inland port near Dublin Airport. The latest stage of the inland port will include a site with the capacity to store more than 2,000 shipping containers and infrastructures such as an ESB substation, an office building and gantry crane.

Dublin Port Company recently submitted a planning application for a €320 million project that aims to provide significant additional capacity at the facility within the port in order to cope with increases in trade up to 2040. The scheme will see a new roll-on/roll-off jetty built to handle ferries of up to 240 metres in length, as well as the redevelopment of an oil berth into a deep-water container berth.

Dublin Port FAQ

Dublin was little more than a monastic settlement until the Norse invasion in the 8th and 9th centuries when they selected the Liffey Estuary as their point of entry to the country as it provided relatively easy access to the central plains of Ireland. Trading with England and Europe followed which required port facilities, so the development of Dublin Port is inextricably linked to the development of Dublin City, so it is fair to say the origins of the Port go back over one thousand years. As a result, the modern organisation Dublin Port has a long and remarkable history, dating back over 300 years from 1707.

The original Port of Dublin was situated upriver, a few miles from its current location near the modern Civic Offices at Wood Quay and close to Christchurch Cathedral. The Port remained close to that area until the new Custom House opened in the 1790s. In medieval times Dublin shipped cattle hides to Britain and the continent, and the returning ships carried wine, pottery and other goods.

510 acres. The modern Dublin Port is located either side of the River Liffey, out to its mouth. On the north side of the river, the central part (205 hectares or 510 acres) of the Port lies at the end of East Wall and North Wall, from Alexandra Quay.

Dublin Port Company is a State-owned commercial company responsible for operating and developing Dublin Port.

Dublin Port Company is a self-financing, and profitable private limited company wholly-owned by the State, whose business is to manage Dublin Port, Ireland's premier Port. Established as a corporate entity in 1997, Dublin Port Company is responsible for the management, control, operation and development of the Port.

Captain William Bligh (of Mutiny of the Bounty fame) was a visitor to Dublin in 1800, and his visit to the capital had a lasting effect on the Port. Bligh's study of the currents in Dublin Bay provided the basis for the construction of the North Wall. This undertaking led to the growth of Bull Island to its present size.

Yes. Dublin Port is the largest freight and passenger port in Ireland. It handles almost 50% of all trade in the Republic of Ireland.

All cargo handling activities being carried out by private sector companies operating in intensely competitive markets within the Port. Dublin Port Company provides world-class facilities, services, accommodation and lands in the harbour for ships, goods and passengers.

Eamonn O'Reilly is the Dublin Port Chief Executive.

Capt. Michael McKenna is the Dublin Port Harbour Master

In 2019, 1,949,229 people came through the Port.

In 2019, there were 158 cruise liner visits.

In 2019, 9.4 million gross tonnes of exports were handled by Dublin Port.

In 2019, there were 7,898 ship arrivals.

In 2019, there was a gross tonnage of 38.1 million.

In 2019, there were 559,506 tourist vehicles.

There were 98,897 lorries in 2019

Boats can navigate the River Liffey into Dublin by using the navigational guidelines. Find the guidelines on this page here.

VHF channel 12. Commercial vessels using Dublin Port or Dun Laoghaire Port typically have a qualified pilot or certified master with proven local knowledge on board. They "listen out" on VHF channel 12 when in Dublin Port's jurisdiction.

A Dublin Bay webcam showing the south of the Bay at Dun Laoghaire and a distant view of Dublin Port Shipping is here
Dublin Port is creating a distributed museum on its lands in Dublin City.
 A Liffey Tolka Project cycle and pedestrian way is the key to link the elements of this distributed museum together.  The distributed museum starts at the Diving Bell and, over the course of 6.3km, will give Dubliners a real sense of the City, the Port and the Bay.  For visitors, it will be a unique eye-opening stroll and vista through and alongside one of Europe’s busiest ports:  Diving Bell along Sir John Rogerson’s Quay over the Samuel Beckett Bridge, past the Scherzer Bridge and down the North Wall Quay campshire to Berth 18 - 1.2 km.   Liffey Tolka Project - Tree-lined pedestrian and cycle route between the River Liffey and the Tolka Estuary - 1.4 km with a 300-metre spur along Alexandra Road to The Pumphouse (to be completed by Q1 2021) and another 200 metres to The Flour Mill.   Tolka Estuary Greenway - Construction of Phase 1 (1.9 km) starts in December 2020 and will be completed by Spring 2022.  Phase 2 (1.3 km) will be delivered within the following five years.  The Pumphouse is a heritage zone being created as part of the Alexandra Basin Redevelopment Project.  The first phase of 1.6 acres will be completed in early 2021 and will include historical port equipment and buildings and a large open space for exhibitions and performances.  It will be expanded in a subsequent phase to incorporate the Victorian Graving Dock No. 1 which will be excavated and revealed. 
 The largest component of the distributed museum will be The Flour Mill.  This involves the redevelopment of the former Odlums Flour Mill on Alexandra Road based on a masterplan completed by Grafton Architects to provide a mix of port operational uses, a National Maritime Archive, two 300 seat performance venues, working and studio spaces for artists and exhibition spaces.   The Flour Mill will be developed in stages over the remaining twenty years of Masterplan 2040 alongside major port infrastructure projects.

Source: Dublin Port Company ©Afloat 2020. 

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