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Displaying items by tag: Harbour

The Cunard Cruise Ship Queen Elizabeth arrived in to Dublin Port this morning on schedule marking the start of an important visit to Irish shores. The ship passed the Baily Light marking the entrance to Dublin Bay at 7am. The maiden voyage here of the 90,901 gross registered tonnes cruise ship starts in the capital where the liner will berth on the river Liffey before heading south to Cork harbour where a major ceremony is planned for the arrival of the 965-feet long ship.
Published in Cruise Liners

On Saturday 10th September 2011, MV Queen Elizabeth will make her maiden call to Cobh in the Port of Cork. To coincide with this visit the Port of Cork will formally present a plaque to the Captain of the Queen Elizabeth on the quayside at 10.30am.

This will be followed by a Lusitania Memorial Service led by the Captain and Chairman of the Port of Cork at the memorial in Cobh Town.

Saturday 10th September 2011
0900hrs - MV Queen Elizabeth arrives in Cobh
1045hrs – Plaque exchange with Port of Cork and Cunard
1115hrs – Lusitania Memorial Service Begins in the centre of Cobh Town
1145hrs – Memorial Service Ends
1145hrs – 1245hrs – Band 1 Southern Brigade will play in the promenade in Cobh

Published in Cruise Liners

This year Cork Harbour Open Day is set to be a great day with so much happening all around the harbour. Now in its third year, Cork Harbour Open Day has grown and each year offers more and more activities both on and off the water.

The day itself is a great day for people to see exactly what Cork Harbour has to offer, and this year is no exception with the second largest natural harbour in the world will playing host to the Cobh to Blackrock sailing race, kayaking on the River Lee, crab fishing in Cobh, and for the first time a free open day at the National Maritime College of Ireland (NMCI) in Ringaskiddy and Fastnet Lines MV Julia open to the public for tours and lunch.

Cork Harbour Community Radio will broadcast throughout the day on frequency 98.3FM live from the NMCI. This community radio initiative is part of a response to the great sense of community developing in the Cork Harbour area and has been made possible by the combined effort and support of many harbour side groups and organisations.

This year will also see the first ferry shuttle service operated by 'Whale of a Time' and sponsored by the Port of Cork and NMCI running in the lower harbour calling at Ringaskiddy, Monkstown, Cobh, Aghada and Crosshaven. Free to anyone who wishes to use it, this ferry will be a great way to see the harbour and get around to the different locations and attractions.

Visitors to Ringaksiddy will be given the opportunity to go on a free guided tour around the National Maritime College of Ireland and see their panoramic bridge ship simulators, the survival pool and the marine workshops. Staying in Ringaksiddy, at the Deepwater Quay, Fastnet Lines' MV Julia will open to the public giving people the chance to go onboard the ferry and even have some lunch if they wish. In the evening, Cork Corona Film Festival will hold a fundraiser themed the 'Amazing Cork Maritime Experience' at the NMCI from 5pm onwards.

In Cobh, Cunard's MV Queen Elizabeth will make her maiden call to the Port of Cork and to coincide with this visit, Cunard and the Port of Cork have organised a Lusitania Memorial Service in Cobh led by the Captain of Queen Elizabeth. To add to the occasion, Band 1 Southern Brigade will play in the promenade after the service. Both events are free and open to all.

In the afternoon 'See You in Cobh' will run a crab fishing competition for kids. The Irish Coastguard, RNLI and the Search and Rescue Helicopter will perform a search and rescue demonstration in the lower harbour near Monsktown and Ringaskiddy at 3pm. At 5pm when MV Queen Elizabeth departs a 'Fond Farewell' is being organised to encourage spectators around the harbour to wave this great ocean liner off as she departs Cork harbour. Great locations around the harbour to see the departure are Roches Point, Weavers Point, Camden Fort, Cobh town or Whitegate.

Spike Island will be open to the public all day, with boat rides operating from Kennedy Pier in Cobh to the island throughout the day. Live music, face painters, clowns and jugglers will be on the island to entertain and visitors to the island are being encouraged to bring their own picnic for the day.

In Crosshaven, the Rescue Camden Committee have organised a free open day from 12-6pm. The fort will host the Airborne 101 re-enactors and a weapons display and a 'Port in Pictures' photograph exhibition. Camden Fort is a perfect location to watch MV Queen Elizabeth as she departs Cobh at 5pm. Crosshaven will also hold their annual triathlon at 4pm.

In Cork City, the Irish naval vessel L.E.Ciara will be open to the public for free tours of the ship from 11am to 4pm. Also in the morning visitors will get to see the amazing 150 cars taking part in this year's Cannonball Run in aid of Barretstown Kids charity, as they depart Custom House quay at 11am. Blackrock Castle Observatory will present their theatrical tours bringing the colourful story of the castle to life from 400 years ago to present day. A great venue for all the family and a super location to watch the Cobh to Blackrock sailing race, as the yachts head up the river.

In Aghada, there will be tales and stories of the south east side of the harbour throughout the day held in Rosies Bar. Visitors can use the ferry shuttle which would take them to Aghada's new pontoon facility recently opened.

Aimed at embracing what Cork Harbour has to offer, the Cork Harbour Open Day aims to raise awareness of the different activities available for people in the harbour both on and off the water. It's a great day for all the family with many events free to everyone.

The idea for a Harbour Open Day emerged from discussions between various stakeholders involved in the development and implementation of the Integrated Strategy for the Harbour. A group comprising representatives from UCC, City and County Councils and the Port of Cork set about working together to engage users of the Harbour and to organise the Open Day.

Published in Cork Harbour
Tagged under

We had great reaction to the dramatic 'windward capsize' picture from last weekend's Feva national championships on our home page.

Afloat Photographer Bob Bateman (who else?) was on the Curlane Bank in Cork Harbour to capture the windward capsize of plucky youngsters Grattan Roberts /James McCarthy who finished eighth in the 30-boat regatta. Here's the full sequence of that windward capsize...

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Approaching the weather mark. The helmsman bears off for the important rounding and the crew moves inboard for the spinnaker hoist...

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As the boat bears off the mainsail is out too far...

_DSC3638
and the kicker is eased too much...

_DSC3639
creating twist at the top of the mainsail (which is out of picture)

_DSC3641
the non centred crew weight contributes to a death roll...

_DSC3642
 
that ends in a capsize to windward.....yikes!


To avoid this, it's an idea to ease off the kicker to a marked position so as to keep the leech closed.

It's worth remembering too that in big breezes you need to ease and gently bear away with correct twist in the main to stop a capsize to leeward!

Centreboard position also plays a part. Too little centreboard down can result in a broach to weather whereas too much centreboard down in a bear away can result in capsize to leeward.

Published in RS Sailing
Tagged under

When a property doesn't have as many redeeming features as the developer would like, extra effort is put into talking it up by way of the promotional brochure. It could be said that the gloss of the brochure takes the place of the gloss of the property. It is to be earnestly hoped that this isn't the case with the Dun Laoghaire Harbour Company's Consultation Masterplan. While a fine example of the graphic designer's craft, once the observer has penetrated the overly complex web presentation, the content is closer to the curate's egg – a mixture of good and, well, not so good.

The introduction to the plan does a fine job of setting the context, although the author loses some of the high ground by suggesting that Dun Laoghaire is "one of the most beautiful man-made harbours in the world".

The masterplan does recover from this and the other floral verbosity of the opening statements to identify the crucial roles played by marine leisure interests and the town of Dun Laoghaire in the sustainable development of the harbour. The plan regularly refers to the need for careful design to promote greater interaction between town and harbour, an area of failure of past administrations on both sides of the railway tracks.

In the detail, it is interesting to note that the plan shies away somewhat from the flawed concept, mooted in previous versions, that Dun Laoghaire can become a cruise liner port. This is clearly a non-runner in the short to medium term as there is very little to commend Dun Laoghaire over its larger, deeper and more commercially inclined foster parent to the north.

Another area that seems to be set up for failure is the idea that the Harbour Company, in their own words "custodians of this valuable national asset", could contemplate the private ownership of areas of the harbour through property development.

The plan hints at improved access for the watersports constituency, but a serious flaw is the lack of a stronger stance on establishing a safe, wide, non-tidally restricted slipway with easy access to open water, something that does not exist in greater Dublin area outside of the yacht clubs. Such a facility, with the appropriate management, could be self funding.

And in the pie-in-the-sky category is the suggestion of placing a public baths on the inside of the East Pier, a proposal that requires the reclamation of valuable sheltered water.

The plan refers extensively to the diaspora project, but outside of the masterplan itself, this idea has not caught the imagination. It does refer to a maritime element in the project, but does not see this as mainstream. This is a pity, because moving the National Maritime Museum 100 metres from its current location could provide Dun Laoghaire with the iconic attraction it needs to start making it a destination in its own right, changing from its traditional role as a bi-directional gateway. A museum project on the Carlisle Pier, with the potential for floating exhibits alongside, could bring in excess of 1/4 million visitors each year.

The plan refers to similar developments in Leith, near Edinburgh, where former royal yacht Britannia is moored, but curiously neglects to mention Falmouth, where a town of some 22,000 people attracts a similar number to its recently constructed maritime museum. And neither Leith nor Falmouth enjoy the considerable transport network, both marine and land based, that makes Dun Laoghaire so easy to get to.

Comment on this story below

Published in Water Rat

The 'best public boat launching facilities in Ireland' will be provided in a final Greystones Harbour Plan released today, according to Fine Gael Concillor Derek Mitchell.

Having consulted with the community Sispar has produced their final plan for the Harbour for September and are currently implementing it, the Councillor says.

'This provides the best public boat launching facilities in Ireland even in this temporary solution. There is also good walking access to the area and South Pier together with car parking and green areas. To construct the Health Centre safely the hoardings at the North end will remain but the large green area there should open in a year, Mitchell, a winner in the Ruffian class in last week's VDLR sailing regatta, told Afloat.ie

greystones_1a

greystones_1b

Drawings showing the proposed public access arrangements at Greystones Harbour. For higher resolution versions the pdf's are attached below.

'I am pleased they are implementing most of my plan and opposed to more meetings which will only delay implementation', he added.

Published in Greystones Harbour
Today's Irish Times editorial raises questions over the new 'masterplan' for Dun Laoghaire harbour.
As previously reported in Afloat.ie, the plan is intended to position Dun Laoghaire "as a marine, leisure and tourism destination of international calibre".
But The Irish Times says: "[The] company needs to reassure the public that all of the proposed uses can be safely accommodated within the granite enclosing arms of this great harbour, without conflicting with each other.
"Is it realistic, for example, to have greatly expanded facilities for sailing and at the same time provide berthing for very large 'next generation' cruise liners? How realistic is the plan to develop 300 apartments within the harbour area in the current market?"
Doubts are also raised about the feasibility of Dublin hosting two cruise liner facilities if plans to expand Dublin Port get the go-ahead.
The Irish Times website has more on the story HERE.

Today's Irish Times editorial raises questions over the new 'masterplan' for Dun Laoghaire harbour.

As previously reported on Afloat.ie, the plan is intended to position Dun Laoghaire "as a marine, leisure and tourism destination of international calibre".

But The Irish Times says: "[The] company needs to reassure the public that all of the proposed uses can be safely accommodated within the granite enclosing arms of this great harbour, without conflicting with each other.

"Is it realistic, for example, to have greatly expanded facilities for sailing and at the same time provide berthing for very large 'next generation' cruise liners? How realistic is the plan to develop 300 apartments within the harbour area in the current market?"

Doubts are also raised about the feasibility of Dublin hosting two cruise liner facilities if plans to expand Dublin Port get the go-ahead.

The Irish Times website has more on the story HERE. The Dun Laoghaire Yacht Club's joint response to the masterplan is HERE

Published in Dublin Bay

Councillor Derek Mitchell says Greystones Harbour will be open in early September. The news follows a meeting between developers, Sispar, and the Town Council.

According to Mitchell, Sispar told a meeting of Town Councillors that they intend to open temporary facilities at Greystones Harbour by the end of August.

This will consist of:

· Taking down most hoardings and replacing with decorative railings thus opening up the views. The railings are already being made.

· Opening the harbour beach and second public slipway which is a calmer one.

· Fencing the entire area to be given to clubs for boat parking, greatly improving facilities for Anglers, Rowers, Sea Scouts, Divers and Sailors.

· Car Parking and wide access to the new South Pier.

· Starting building the Primary Health Centre by September 2011 and completing within 12 months. This will allow part of the public square to be finished.

· Provide some moorings.

· If there is no development of homes in 18 months time they will landscape the Public Park to the North.

They will review demand for the marina and hope to put in temporary facilities at least during 2012.

These items implement most of my plan and I welcome the good news of both good facilities and starting the Health Centre this year. There will be further consultation with harbour users and residents next week. The plan will then be finalised and implemented.

Published in Greystones Harbour
Tagged under
Classes Zero, One and Two have completed one race in the first day's racing of the ICRA National Championships in Crosshaven writes Claire Bateman. The White Sails division have also completed one race. Classes three and four were completing their second race at lunch time. In the Quarter Ton Class, at the first rounding of the gybe mark in race two, local boat Tiger was first around followed by Anchor Challenge and the New Zealand Black Fun. Wind strength was 5 knots N.W. (not the forecasted gale) and competitors were contending with a heavy swell. More later.
Published in ICRA

Dun Laoghaire Harbour hopes to create 1000 new jobs according to the new Consultation Harbour Masterplan, on public display this Saturday and Sunday from 12 noon to 6pm at the Terminal building in the harbour. Mr Leo Varadkar, T.D., Minister for Transport, Tourism and Sport visited the Harbour Board today to view the Masterplan model and the plans.

The Dun Laoghaire Waterfront Yacht Club's Submission to the Harbour Masterplan is Here.

"The Masterplan will position Dun Laoghaire Harbour as a marine, leisure and tourism destination of international calibre", says Gerry Dunne, Chief Executive Officer, Dun Laoghaire Harbour Board. "We need to spend an average of €5m a year on maintaining and developing the Harbour infrastructure. The Masterplan will involve investment of more than €230m, over the next 10-15 years and will result in 1000 sustainable jobs in areas such as tourism, marine service companies, select retail, and food and beverage."

Leo Varadkar TD, Minister for Transport, Tourism & Sport said "I welcome the master-planning initiative being taken by Dun Laoghaire Harbour Company. This is in line with international best practice and with measures to improve integrated transport planning more generally. I know there is very keen local interest in the future development of the harbour and I would encourage all the local stakeholders to participate positively in the process.

"In addition to being a successful commercial ferry port, this harbour is also the State's largest marine leisure amenity, an important maritime heritage site, and host to what is reputed to be the nation's most popular walk. The masterplan will help the company to successfully manage these multiple roles the future.

"I am particularly interested in making the most of the harbour's potential, both as a tourist attraction in its own right and as an attractive gateway for tourists to enter the country."

Major highlights of the Masterplan will be an International Diaspora Centre on the Carlisle Pier, which is expected to attract over 1 million visitors per year.  There will be other major commercial attractions, appropriate residential development and a new cruise berthing facility to enable Dublin Bay to welcome the Next Generation Cruise Ships to Dun Laoghaire.

There will be many improvements for the public and the many Voluntary Groups who use the amenities of the harbour, including a huge increase in public access to the waterfront, new slipways for the general public to use, and a new public marina.  The Masterplan is also making a specific commitment to enable Dun Laoghaire and Dublin Bay to host major International Sailing Events every year.

The Consultation Masterplan shows the Harbour Company's current thinking and asks people again for their views.  It takes into account all the ideas received by post and through the www.dlharbour.ie/masterplan website, the survey of people walking the East Pier as well as the meetings held over the last six months with different stakeholders who live and run businesses in the area.

"Dun Laoghaire harbour is one of the most beautiful man-made harbours in the world.  We want it to be recognised internationally as an exciting waterfront, marine and tourist destination – one which elegantly integrates the local town with a historic 200 year old harbour and offers a striking combination of modern amenities mixed with a traditional marine ambience in a Dublin Bay setting," says Dunne.

Published in Dublin Bay
Page 5 of 8

About Dublin Port 

Dublin Port Company is currently investing about €277 million on its Alexandra Basin Redevelopment (ABR), which is due to be complete by 2021. The redevelopment will improve the port's capacity for large ships by deepening and lengthening 3km of its 7km of berths. The ABR is part of a €1bn capital programme up to 2028, which will also include initial work on the Dublin Port’s MP2 Project - a major capital development project proposal for works within the existing port lands in the northeastern part of the port.

Dublin Port has also recently secured planning approval for the development of the next phase of its inland port near Dublin Airport. The latest stage of the inland port will include a site with the capacity to store more than 2,000 shipping containers and infrastructures such as an ESB substation, an office building and gantry crane.

Dublin Port Company recently submitted a planning application for a €320 million project that aims to provide significant additional capacity at the facility within the port in order to cope with increases in trade up to 2040. The scheme will see a new roll-on/roll-off jetty built to handle ferries of up to 240 metres in length, as well as the redevelopment of an oil berth into a deep-water container berth.

Dublin Port FAQ

Dublin was little more than a monastic settlement until the Norse invasion in the 8th and 9th centuries when they selected the Liffey Estuary as their point of entry to the country as it provided relatively easy access to the central plains of Ireland. Trading with England and Europe followed which required port facilities, so the development of Dublin Port is inextricably linked to the development of Dublin City, so it is fair to say the origins of the Port go back over one thousand years. As a result, the modern organisation Dublin Port has a long and remarkable history, dating back over 300 years from 1707.

The original Port of Dublin was situated upriver, a few miles from its current location near the modern Civic Offices at Wood Quay and close to Christchurch Cathedral. The Port remained close to that area until the new Custom House opened in the 1790s. In medieval times Dublin shipped cattle hides to Britain and the continent, and the returning ships carried wine, pottery and other goods.

510 acres. The modern Dublin Port is located either side of the River Liffey, out to its mouth. On the north side of the river, the central part (205 hectares or 510 acres) of the Port lies at the end of East Wall and North Wall, from Alexandra Quay.

Dublin Port Company is a State-owned commercial company responsible for operating and developing Dublin Port.

Dublin Port Company is a self-financing, and profitable private limited company wholly-owned by the State, whose business is to manage Dublin Port, Ireland's premier Port. Established as a corporate entity in 1997, Dublin Port Company is responsible for the management, control, operation and development of the Port.

Captain William Bligh (of Mutiny of the Bounty fame) was a visitor to Dublin in 1800, and his visit to the capital had a lasting effect on the Port. Bligh's study of the currents in Dublin Bay provided the basis for the construction of the North Wall. This undertaking led to the growth of Bull Island to its present size.

Yes. Dublin Port is the largest freight and passenger port in Ireland. It handles almost 50% of all trade in the Republic of Ireland.

All cargo handling activities being carried out by private sector companies operating in intensely competitive markets within the Port. Dublin Port Company provides world-class facilities, services, accommodation and lands in the harbour for ships, goods and passengers.

Eamonn O'Reilly is the Dublin Port Chief Executive.

Capt. Michael McKenna is the Dublin Port Harbour Master

In 2019, 1,949,229 people came through the Port.

In 2019, there were 158 cruise liner visits.

In 2019, 9.4 million gross tonnes of exports were handled by Dublin Port.

In 2019, there were 7,898 ship arrivals.

In 2019, there was a gross tonnage of 38.1 million.

In 2019, there were 559,506 tourist vehicles.

There were 98,897 lorries in 2019

Boats can navigate the River Liffey into Dublin by using the navigational guidelines. Find the guidelines on this page here.

VHF channel 12. Commercial vessels using Dublin Port or Dun Laoghaire Port typically have a qualified pilot or certified master with proven local knowledge on board. They "listen out" on VHF channel 12 when in Dublin Port's jurisdiction.

A Dublin Bay webcam showing the south of the Bay at Dun Laoghaire and a distant view of Dublin Port Shipping is here
Dublin Port is creating a distributed museum on its lands in Dublin City.
 A Liffey Tolka Project cycle and pedestrian way is the key to link the elements of this distributed museum together.  The distributed museum starts at the Diving Bell and, over the course of 6.3km, will give Dubliners a real sense of the City, the Port and the Bay.  For visitors, it will be a unique eye-opening stroll and vista through and alongside one of Europe’s busiest ports:  Diving Bell along Sir John Rogerson’s Quay over the Samuel Beckett Bridge, past the Scherzer Bridge and down the North Wall Quay campshire to Berth 18 - 1.2 km.   Liffey Tolka Project - Tree-lined pedestrian and cycle route between the River Liffey and the Tolka Estuary - 1.4 km with a 300-metre spur along Alexandra Road to The Pumphouse (to be completed by Q1 2021) and another 200 metres to The Flour Mill.   Tolka Estuary Greenway - Construction of Phase 1 (1.9 km) starts in December 2020 and will be completed by Spring 2022.  Phase 2 (1.3 km) will be delivered within the following five years.  The Pumphouse is a heritage zone being created as part of the Alexandra Basin Redevelopment Project.  The first phase of 1.6 acres will be completed in early 2021 and will include historical port equipment and buildings and a large open space for exhibitions and performances.  It will be expanded in a subsequent phase to incorporate the Victorian Graving Dock No. 1 which will be excavated and revealed. 
 The largest component of the distributed museum will be The Flour Mill.  This involves the redevelopment of the former Odlums Flour Mill on Alexandra Road based on a masterplan completed by Grafton Architects to provide a mix of port operational uses, a National Maritime Archive, two 300 seat performance venues, working and studio spaces for artists and exhibition spaces.   The Flour Mill will be developed in stages over the remaining twenty years of Masterplan 2040 alongside major port infrastructure projects.

Source: Dublin Port Company ©Afloat 2020. 

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