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Dun Laoghaire's new Harbour master is Captain Frank Allen, according to an announcement by Dun Laoghaire Harbour Company this morning.

Captain Allen replaces Captain Simon Coate who is retiring.

A native of Cork, Captain Allen has spent all his working life in shipping. His first management role was as General Manager of Dundlak shipowners from 1986 to 1997. He was then appointed Ships captain for Carrisbrooke Shipping in the UK and subsequently worked as Operations Manager for Swansea Cork Ferries from 199 to 2003 before joining Dundalk Port as Harbour Master.

The Harbour Company is about to launch a Masterplan for the 200 year old harbour., the country's largest sailing and boating centre.

Published in Dublin Bay

As the first vessel edged under the Bridge and the inland waterways. Fleet turned purposely into Banagher Harbour, it was clear that these were no ordinary boats. These were the vanguard of the Heritage Boats that are celebrating the 10th anniversary of their association over the coming weeks.

The 6th Class students of Saint Rynagh's National School were eagerly awaiting the arrival of the fleet. In recent weeks they have been participating is a project centred round the Heritage Boats, their links with Banagher and incorporating the wider heritage and history of the Shannon River. The students, supported by the school principal Mr Fergal McMahon, class teacher Ms Catherine Dolan and associate teacher and local historian Mr James Scully, explored the impact that the River Shannon has had on the town and its hinterland over the centuries.

The Heritage Boats, now visiting the town's harbour, are the very same boats that many decades ago carried the cargos that were the lifeblood of the nation's commerce. Banagher was an important harbour and distribution point on the inland waterway system.

Supported by Offaly County Council and with the great help of renowned artist Ms Rosalind Fanning from the Tin Jug Studio in Birr, the students have documented their work in a unique publication called "HBA 10 @ Banagher".

With their many new young fans, the old boats of the fleet of the Heritage Boat Association are assured a warm welcome in Banagher in the decades ahead.

Published in Inland Waterways
Dun Laoghaire's future lies in tourism and leisure, according to a submission on the new 'master plan' for the busy harbour.
The Irish Times reports that the town's top sailing and yacht clubs, who have come together under the banner of Dun Laoghaire Combined Clubs, are putting aside their individual interests "in favour of a larger and longer-term vision for the harbour".
The clubs' submission urges a rethink on public access to both the shore and water sides of the harbour. Inprovements in linking the town with the harbour area are already a goal of the master plan.
"Properly developed with a marine tourism and leisure focus [Dun Laoghaire] can generate new and sustainable sources of income." they said.
Dun Laoghaire Combined Clubs comprises the 'big four' waterfront clubs - the National, Royal Irish, Royal St George and Dun Laoghaire Motor Yacht Club - as well as the Dublin Bay Sailing Club and the Royal Alfred Yacht Club.
The Irish Times has more on the story HERE.

Dun Laoghaire's future lies in tourism and leisure, according to a submission on the new 'master plan' for the busy harbour.

The Irish Times reports that the town's top sailing and yacht clubs, who have come together under the banner of Dun Laoghaire Combined Clubs, are putting aside their individual interests "in favour of a larger and longer-term vision for the harbour".

The clubs' submission urges a rethink on public access to both the shore and water sides of the harbour. Inprovements in linking the town with the harbour area are already a goal of the master plan.

"Properly developed with a marine tourism and leisure focus [Dun Laoghaire] can generate new and sustainable sources of income." they said.

Dun Laoghaire Combined Clubs comprises the 'big four' waterfront clubs - the National, Royal Irish, Royal St George and Dun Laoghaire Motor Yacht Club - as well as the Dublin Bay Sailing Club and the Royal Alfred Yacht Club.

The Irish Times has more on the story HERE.

Published in Dublin Bay
A Donegal businessman is fronting a new campaign that seeks a more positive and direct approach to supporting harbour businesses.
John Shine - who spearheads the 'Fishing for Jobs' campaign - has accused the Department of Agriculture, Fisheries and Food (DAFF) of thwarting the growth of his and others' businesses "at every turn", The Irish Times reports.
Shine and his fellow campaigners want a full policy adaptation of the 2009 McIver report on the development of business plans for harbour centres, which found a "lack of business focus" among harbour and department officials.
The report noted that existing harbour business tenants had "frustrating" relationships with the DAFF especially with regard to leases. Shine said approximately 40% of property in Killybegs harbour, which has benefited from a €50m development, is lying idle due to a "negative" approach by the DAFF.
The Irish Times has more on the story HERE.

A Donegal businessman is fronting a new campaign that seeks a more positive and direct approach to supporting harbour businesses. 

John Shine - who spearheads the 'Fishing for Jobs' campaign - has accused the Department of Agriculture, Fisheries and Food (DAFF) of thwarting the growth of his and others' businesses "at every turn", The Irish Times reports.

Shine and his fellow campaigners want a full policy adaptation of the 2009 McIver report on the development of business plans for harbour centres, which found a "lack of business focus" among harbour and department officials.

The report noted that existing harbour business tenants had "frustrating" relationships with the DAFF especially with regard to leases. Shine said approximately 40% of property in Killybegs harbour, which has benefited from a €50m development, is lying idle due to a "negative" approach by the DAFF.

The Irish Times has more on the story HERE.

Published in Irish Harbours

Wicklow Councillor Derek Mitchell has moved to reassure frustrated boaters and townspeople alike that the partially completed €300 million Greystones Harbour and Marina will be completed. In a letter to the Irish Times this morning the councillor acknowledges that the delays are 'frustrating' but advises the council holds a €5 million bond to ensure the project will be completed.

A recent survey of prospective boat owners found 80% of berths required in the proposed 200 berth marina would be under eight mertres. Mitchell admitted earlier this year more interest from boat owners was required to get the marina underway.

The council bond is not exercisable until 2014.

A slipway at the community harbour is operational but the public square and five free clubhouses for different boating activities from angling to sailing are still to be provided. Last November builders Sispar held an open day to show off the impressive marine works.

A spokesperson for development consortium Sispar previously advised the decision on funding the next phase rests with that National Assets Management Agency (Nama).

Published in Greystones Harbour
Top British architects have won the commission to develop an ambitious master plan for Dun Laoghaire Harbour.
The Dun Laoghaire Gazette reports that Metropolitan Workshop have been tasked examining the feasibility of redeveloping the port to attract cruise liners carrying 100,000 passengers annually.
The plan, to be completed by the summer, is aimed at realising Dun Laoghaire's potential "as a major marine, leisure and tourism destination".
Improved public spaces linking the town and the harbour, tourism opportunities and new cultural attractions are just some of the proposals that the plan will take into consideration.
Jonny McKenna of Metropolitan Workshop old the Gazette: "Our approach is anchored in Dun Laoghaire's history and heritage. Our aim is to broaden the appeal of the harbour, both locally and internationally, as a world-class waterfront destination."
The consultation and drafting phase of the master plan will be completed by the end of this month.

Top British architects have won the commission to develop an ambitious master plan for Dun Laoghaire Harbour.

The Dun Laoghaire Gazette reports that Metropolitan Workshop have been tasked examining the feasibility of redeveloping the port to attract cruise liners carrying 100,000 passengers annually.

The plan, to be completed by the summer, is aimed at realising Dun Laoghaire's potential "as a major marine, leisure and tourism destination".

Improved public spaces linking the town and the harbour, tourism opportunities and new cultural attractions are just some of the proposals that the plan will take into consideration.

Jonny McKenna of Metropolitan Workshop old the Gazette: "Our approach is anchored in Dun Laoghaire's history and heritage. Our aim is to broaden the appeal of the harbour, both locally and internationally, as a world-class waterfront destination."

The consultation and drafting phase of the master plan will be completed by the end of this month.

Published in Dublin Bay

A newsletter giving details of the most popular size berth requirements at the proposed Greystones Harbour Marina has been sent to boat owners on a waiting list for the Wicklow marina.

The analysis finds 80% of the berths required are under 10 metres (32 foot). Only 2 berths were required for boats over 13m (42 feet).

In nearby Dun Laoghaire, at the country's biggest marina, the 820 berths there range in size from 6m (19 feet) to 30m (98 feet). The average berth requirement on Dublin Bay is 9-10m (29-32 feet).

The March newsletter says examination of the waiting list revealed duplication of an original waiting list which prompted a fresh exercise to establish the current market demand in 2011. The new survey of 300 people was carried out by a marina consultant, working for developer Sispar. It delivered 79 responses. An extract from the analysis is below.

The tabulation from the newsletter reflects the breakdown of the responses in terms of current berth size numbers and the extrapolation into the requirement for totals when fully developed based on to-days statistics.

Greystones Marina Berths Analysis
Berth Size Numbers to 6/1/11 % of Current Market Full
Dev Berth Nos.
<6m 9 12.4 29
6-7m 12 15.2 35
7-8m 14 17.7 41
8-9m 5 6.3 15
9-10m 17 21.5 50
10-11m 8 10.1 24
11-12m 6 7.6 18
12m-13m 6 7.6 18
>13m 2 2.6 5
Total 79 101 235

Published in Greystones Harbour
The Department of Transport's latest marine notice lays out the format for reporting inadequate harbour facilities for handling ship-generated waste.
Shipping companies depend on good standards at receiving ports and harbours in order to comply with the relevant EU directive. But the notice outlines that improvement of port facilities' waste handling is partly dependent on users reporting any inadequacies.
The notice includes the International Maritime Organization's standard format for reporting unsatisfactory port reception facilities.
For all ships, reports should be sent to the relevant port authority as well as the Ship-Source Pollution Prevention Section of the Department of Transport. Non-Irish flagged ships in Irish ports should also send any reports to the ship's flag state.
A PDF of Marine Notice No 17 of 2011 can be viewed/downloaded HERE.

The Department of Transport's latest marine notice lays out the format for reporting inadequate harbour facilities for handling ship-generated waste.

Shipping companies depend on good standards at receiving ports and harbours in order to comply with the relevant EU directive. But the notice outlines that improvement of port facilities' waste handling is partly dependent on users reporting any inadequacies.

The notice includes the International Maritime Organization's standard format for reporting unsatisfactory port reception facilities. 

For all ships, reports should be sent to the relevant port authority as well as the Ship-Source Pollution Prevention Section of the Department of Transport. Non-Irish flagged ships in Irish ports should also send any reports to the ship's flag state.

A PDF of Marine Notice No 17 of 2011 can be viewed/downloaded HERE.

Published in Ports & Shipping
18th March 2011

Ports Must Not be Sold

The self-appointed group of 17 business, public and political figures who drew up their Blueprint for Ireland's Recovery were well-intentioned but appear to have lacked maritime awareness. To propose the sale of the country's ports is a nonsense which must be rejected. At a time when an Irish Government appears to have recovered its appreciation of the importance of the marine sphere it would be a travesty to turn control of the nation's primary channels of access and exit over to private interests. This would be akin to a householder, strapped for cash, selling the doorway to his home and then having to pay others for the right to enter and leave.

Over 90 per cent of the nation's exports and imports move by sea. Our ports are the essential avenue, the doors to Ireland. They are the property of the nation and must work for the people, whose future has been destroyed by the greed of private interests. To suggest that recovery can be achieved by sale of these vital assets is a nonsense and damaging to the interests of the nation.

What is needed is a clear, definitive national ports policy in which the government sets down what the ports are to do for the nation. Their role should be identified clearly, their boards and managements told what they are expected to achieve on behalf of the nation, with penalties for failure.

Fine Gael had committed in its election manifesto, to replacing the existing boards of all State Port companies and Harbour Commissioners within one year of entering government.

Fianna Fail and the Progressive Democrats in government had turned the port companies into semi-private entities, responsible for their own financial operations. While it was indicated that this would improve competitiveness and provide better and more cost-friendly services for users, who would be represented on the company boards, there are differing views about how effective this has been.

Competition is not necessarily always the harbinger of effective service or provision of choice. A small island nation with a limited number of primary ports could have a policy maximising effectiveness, delineating between primary and minor ports providing commercial services, supporting the fishing industry and leisure sectors. There must be containment of costs, efficiency of operation and the best services for exporters and importers. There should be investment where required and could even be provision for private investment. But the ownership should remain with the State on behalf of the people.

The ports are national resources, not to be sold off to private interests.

Those who drew up the recovery report which proposes the sale of the ports represented private interests and included are banking and speculative development interests. They echo, in regard to the ports, a similar proposal in the 'second coming' of Bord Snip Nua'. There are some aspects of their suggestions which merit further consideration, but it is regrettable that people at high levels of position in Ireland appear to not fully appreciate that the nation is a small island for whom the sea and its approaches are of vital importance.

Published in Island Nation

If you fancy a rummage through a Bosun's locker then boat Jumble sales on three consecutive weekends and at three separate locations will satisfy all bargain hunters when the Irish boating season kicks off in a fortnight's time.

Each show is offering a range of boating, sailing and water sports equipment and accessories. There are new and used pitches and some familiar trade names in addition to second hand boats/dinghies and nautical “car boot” items.

The first opens on March 27th – the weekend when the clocks go forward – and it takes place on the Carlisle Pier in Dun Laoghaire Harbour from 10am to 4pm.

The next is across Dublin Bay when the RNLI stage a boat jumble at Howth Yacht Club on Saturday 2nd April from 10.30am to 1.30pm.

The last show is at Carrickfergus on Belfast Lough and this 'Irish Boat Jumble' is being promoted as the 'biggest' in Ireland. The Antrim show will be on Sunday 10th April starting at 10am.

All are offering economical rates and friends are being encouraged to team up and pool their surplus gear and share the selling task!


Published in Marine Trade
Page 6 of 8

About Dublin Port 

Dublin Port Company is currently investing about €277 million on its Alexandra Basin Redevelopment (ABR), which is due to be complete by 2021. The redevelopment will improve the port's capacity for large ships by deepening and lengthening 3km of its 7km of berths. The ABR is part of a €1bn capital programme up to 2028, which will also include initial work on the Dublin Port’s MP2 Project - a major capital development project proposal for works within the existing port lands in the northeastern part of the port.

Dublin Port has also recently secured planning approval for the development of the next phase of its inland port near Dublin Airport. The latest stage of the inland port will include a site with the capacity to store more than 2,000 shipping containers and infrastructures such as an ESB substation, an office building and gantry crane.

Dublin Port Company recently submitted a planning application for a €320 million project that aims to provide significant additional capacity at the facility within the port in order to cope with increases in trade up to 2040. The scheme will see a new roll-on/roll-off jetty built to handle ferries of up to 240 metres in length, as well as the redevelopment of an oil berth into a deep-water container berth.

Dublin Port FAQ

Dublin was little more than a monastic settlement until the Norse invasion in the 8th and 9th centuries when they selected the Liffey Estuary as their point of entry to the country as it provided relatively easy access to the central plains of Ireland. Trading with England and Europe followed which required port facilities, so the development of Dublin Port is inextricably linked to the development of Dublin City, so it is fair to say the origins of the Port go back over one thousand years. As a result, the modern organisation Dublin Port has a long and remarkable history, dating back over 300 years from 1707.

The original Port of Dublin was situated upriver, a few miles from its current location near the modern Civic Offices at Wood Quay and close to Christchurch Cathedral. The Port remained close to that area until the new Custom House opened in the 1790s. In medieval times Dublin shipped cattle hides to Britain and the continent, and the returning ships carried wine, pottery and other goods.

510 acres. The modern Dublin Port is located either side of the River Liffey, out to its mouth. On the north side of the river, the central part (205 hectares or 510 acres) of the Port lies at the end of East Wall and North Wall, from Alexandra Quay.

Dublin Port Company is a State-owned commercial company responsible for operating and developing Dublin Port.

Dublin Port Company is a self-financing, and profitable private limited company wholly-owned by the State, whose business is to manage Dublin Port, Ireland's premier Port. Established as a corporate entity in 1997, Dublin Port Company is responsible for the management, control, operation and development of the Port.

Captain William Bligh (of Mutiny of the Bounty fame) was a visitor to Dublin in 1800, and his visit to the capital had a lasting effect on the Port. Bligh's study of the currents in Dublin Bay provided the basis for the construction of the North Wall. This undertaking led to the growth of Bull Island to its present size.

Yes. Dublin Port is the largest freight and passenger port in Ireland. It handles almost 50% of all trade in the Republic of Ireland.

All cargo handling activities being carried out by private sector companies operating in intensely competitive markets within the Port. Dublin Port Company provides world-class facilities, services, accommodation and lands in the harbour for ships, goods and passengers.

Eamonn O'Reilly is the Dublin Port Chief Executive.

Capt. Michael McKenna is the Dublin Port Harbour Master

In 2019, 1,949,229 people came through the Port.

In 2019, there were 158 cruise liner visits.

In 2019, 9.4 million gross tonnes of exports were handled by Dublin Port.

In 2019, there were 7,898 ship arrivals.

In 2019, there was a gross tonnage of 38.1 million.

In 2019, there were 559,506 tourist vehicles.

There were 98,897 lorries in 2019

Boats can navigate the River Liffey into Dublin by using the navigational guidelines. Find the guidelines on this page here.

VHF channel 12. Commercial vessels using Dublin Port or Dun Laoghaire Port typically have a qualified pilot or certified master with proven local knowledge on board. They "listen out" on VHF channel 12 when in Dublin Port's jurisdiction.

A Dublin Bay webcam showing the south of the Bay at Dun Laoghaire and a distant view of Dublin Port Shipping is here
Dublin Port is creating a distributed museum on its lands in Dublin City.
 A Liffey Tolka Project cycle and pedestrian way is the key to link the elements of this distributed museum together.  The distributed museum starts at the Diving Bell and, over the course of 6.3km, will give Dubliners a real sense of the City, the Port and the Bay.  For visitors, it will be a unique eye-opening stroll and vista through and alongside one of Europe’s busiest ports:  Diving Bell along Sir John Rogerson’s Quay over the Samuel Beckett Bridge, past the Scherzer Bridge and down the North Wall Quay campshire to Berth 18 - 1.2 km.   Liffey Tolka Project - Tree-lined pedestrian and cycle route between the River Liffey and the Tolka Estuary - 1.4 km with a 300-metre spur along Alexandra Road to The Pumphouse (to be completed by Q1 2021) and another 200 metres to The Flour Mill.   Tolka Estuary Greenway - Construction of Phase 1 (1.9 km) starts in December 2020 and will be completed by Spring 2022.  Phase 2 (1.3 km) will be delivered within the following five years.  The Pumphouse is a heritage zone being created as part of the Alexandra Basin Redevelopment Project.  The first phase of 1.6 acres will be completed in early 2021 and will include historical port equipment and buildings and a large open space for exhibitions and performances.  It will be expanded in a subsequent phase to incorporate the Victorian Graving Dock No. 1 which will be excavated and revealed. 
 The largest component of the distributed museum will be The Flour Mill.  This involves the redevelopment of the former Odlums Flour Mill on Alexandra Road based on a masterplan completed by Grafton Architects to provide a mix of port operational uses, a National Maritime Archive, two 300 seat performance venues, working and studio spaces for artists and exhibition spaces.   The Flour Mill will be developed in stages over the remaining twenty years of Masterplan 2040 alongside major port infrastructure projects.

Source: Dublin Port Company ©Afloat 2020. 

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