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The Yacht Week is looking for talented skippers and hosts to work in the Mediterranean next summer. Dun Laoghaire Sailing School, the Irish National Sailing & Powerboat School has teamed up with the Yacht Week and Quarterdeck to assist Irish sailors with this exciting opportunity.

Quarterdeck – Training Academy

Quarterdeck provides a tailored Academy that polishes current cooking or sailing skills in order to work with their sister companies The Yacht Week, along with several other private charter partners, in destinations such as Croatia, Greece, Italy, Montenegro, British Virgin Islands, French Polynesia and many more.

Destinations include Croatia, Greece, Italy, Montenegro, British Virgin Islands, French Polynesia and many moreDestinations include Croatia, Greece, Italy, Montenegro, British Virgin Islands, French Polynesia and many more

This is the perfect opportunity if you're looking for your next steps after or during university, looking for your next adventure or a student with a spare summer off.

What does a Quarterdeck host do?

A Quarterdeck host cooks delicious meals, shows guests the incredible local delights, and dances the night away with them under the stars in our world-class locations.

Discover hidden bays for swim stopsDiscover hidden bays for swim stops

What does a Quarterdeck skipper do?

A quarterdeck Skipper guides guests through their adventure. They sail from island to island, discovering hidden bays for swim stops and share their expert local knowledge.

Dublin Open Day Event

Subject to the expected updated public health advice, Quarterdeck is hosting an open day event on Saturday the 11th of December in Dublin. The team from the INSS will be on hand to help explain any prior training requirements and offer solutions.

Sign Up for this event is via this form: https://forms.gle/MjhsRR3Xddev5RvGA

Those interested in getting a better insight into what Quarterdeck and The Yacht Week involve can check out the following links:

Quarterdeck Website: www.quarterdeck.co

The Yacht Week: www.theyachtweek.com

What a typical day at work looks like…

Published in INSS
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Dun Laoghaire based Irish National Sailing & Powerboat School reports a strong demand to get afloat as the country continues to reopen.

There’s such a demand that a new recruitment campaign is underway with watersport and instructor roles for all levels and qualifications. The team at the school are focusing in particular on Dinghy Instructors for their weekday school programmes, powerboat instructors for fully booked weekend courses right up to the end of November and Cruising Instructors for the 2022 season.

Speaking as the recruitment campaign got underway, Chief Instructor Kenneth Rumball describes the schools’ plans for the remainder of 2021 and into 2022 as “shifting from keeping afloat due to COVID-19 towards a busy and fulfilling set of expanded programmes that support the entire marine community through informative and entertaining beginner and intermediate courses”. The school is determined to make the most of a significant increase in interest in watersports and predicts a busy 2022.

The INSS's First 36.7 LulabelleThe INSS's First 36.7 Lulabelle

Glyn Williams has moved from a communications and marketing role in the school to run the busy operation and describes one of the main objectives as “creating regular employment opportunities for instructors, that fit their schedule and allow us to work as a team to increase sailing and powerboating participation”. Glyn was recently joined in the school office by Vonnie Airey, who heads up the Sales and Administration team following the retirement of Wicklow Sailor Dave Ballasty. The school wanted to publicly put on record their thanks and appreciation to Dave who spent the last few years overhauling administration and sales procedures, as well as significantly expanding the weekday primary and second level school programmes.

Part of the INSS's RIB fleet departing Dun Laoghaire HarbourPart of the INSS's RIB fleet departing Dun Laoghaire Harbour

To help fulfil their ambitions, there is a recruitment campaign underway currently for Irish Sailing Dinghy Instructors, Irish Sailing Powerboat Instructors and Cruising Instructors.

All roles have the benefit of a full-time admin and operations support team, “allowing instructors to focus on what they do best – the teaching” according to Kenneth Rumball.

Full details on the roles here

The INSS's sailing waters at Dun Laoghaire HarbourThe INSS's sailing waters at Dun Laoghaire Harbour 

Published in INSS

The Irish National Sailing Club is pleased to announce the election of Dun Laoghaire Laser sailor and dinghy instructor Patricia Kelly to the position of the first Commodore of the six-year-old club at their AGM held online on Monday the 21st of December 2020.

Patricia is a relatively recent convert to sailing, having taken a beginner course roughly five years ago onboard a keelboat before trying out dinghy sailing after joining the Irish National Sailing Club. Patricia embodies the ethos of the INSC, which promotes pay as you go sailing in a fun and safe way and becoming totally immersed in all things small boat sailing.

Patricia Kelly (right) with fellow INSC dinghy instructors Alex Wan, James Linton, Nick Smith and Joan Sheffield (R-L)Patricia Kelly (right) with (right to left) fellow INSC dinghy instructors Alex Wan, James Linton, Nick Smith and Joan Sheffield 

After a short while using the INSC Laser fleet, Patricia took the plunge and bought her own Laser, and was immediately an enthusiastic sailor and progressed quickly. She was instrumental in organising a small group of INSC members to get out on the water for a series of mid-week lessons with various coaches from Dun Laoghaire. This flare for making things happen was a natural asset when the club teamed up with the Irish National Sailing & Powerboat School to develop a group of adult dinghy and keelboat instructors in 2019.

Patricia flew through the various assessment and training modules qualifying as a dinghy instructor and was straight out onto the water that Summer introducing many new sailors to the sport, and most importantly encouraging them as they took their first steps after their courses while sailing with the club.

Patricia Kelly trials the INSC’s new RS Zest dinghy, before designing a training programme for new club members on these new craftPatricia Kelly trials the INSC’s new RS Zest dinghy, before designing a training programme for new club members on these new craft

Elected onto the INSC committee, Patricia was instrumental in driving numerous projects to help the Club develop a pathway and strategy to get more people afloat, and was a contributor to all club activities including putting in a number of shifts at the RS Super Series in the depths of Winter.

Patricia is regularly found on race courses, both in safety boat duties such as the 2019 Laser Masters and is also a regular competitor in her Laser in DBSC Summer and DMYC Frostbite series.

Patricia Kelly (helm) providing safety cover at a RS Super Series Event in Dun LaoghairePatricia Kelly (helm) providing safety cover at a RS Super Series Event in Dun Laoghaire

A contribution of particular note was the heading of a subcommittee tasked with developing a training programme for INSC member for the 2020 season. A comprehensive and truly ambitious programme was developed, drawing on her own experience. The programme was full of specific actions all linked to a measurable outcome and had total support from the entire INSC committee as well as a very supportive and excited membership. Alas, the pandemic has postponed some of the plans, however Patricia did lead the INSC women afloat programme, developing a coaching day with support from Irish Sailing as part of the Women at the Helm initiative that saw one of the busiest and most successful days afloat for the INSC in 2020.

Not a tough choice for Club members, Patricia was elected unanimously, and the Club is looking forward to an exciting 2021 under Commodore Patricia Kelly’s leadership.

Published in INSS

The Irish National Sailing School has produced end of the year summary of its sailing highlights at Dun Laoghaire Harbour in County Dublin, a season like no other due to COVID-19.

"We don't want to forget 2020, the goodwill, support and friendship from staff and customers that can never be diminished", says the centre's Glynn Williams.

Unfortunately, COVID restrictions meant that participation figures fell dramatically in 2020 at the country's biggest sailing school.

The INSS says it has seen around half of the 2019 participation levels of 8,000 students and while that obviously has been a financial challenge, the level of appreciation we have for each of our participants in 2020 is unmeasurable.

The INSS also says it regards itself as 'beyond lucky' because, as an outdoor operator, they’ve been able to safely operate more of our courses and programmes than most would imagine. However, this wouldn’t have been possible without the overwhelming support of all our customers and students, who fully cooperated with every measure, change due to restrictions and direction. Read Williams full report here.

INSS Video

The go-ahead school and club located at the town's West Pier have produced a video again but this year centre Principal Kenny Rumball says the theme of 2020 is on 'giving a huge thank you to the INSS staff, for all the work they have put in, and to the INSS customers for their understanding, cooperation and trust during the COVID-19 pandemic'.

"We're looking forward to getting your afloat in 2021 when its safe to do so" he adds. 

Check out the vid below

2021 Restrictions

Meanwhile, with the extension to Level 5 measures running until the end of January INSS says, unfortunately, it is unable to run quite a number of programmes but is hoping to do in the near future when government guidelines permit it and it is safe to do so.

Published in INSS

The Irish National Sailing and Powerboat School (INSS) is looking forward to the return of the Saturday Sailing programme for kids aged seven to 17.

After a successful summer implementing new measures in accordance with coronavirus restrictions, the programme will be structured to meet social distancing and group size requirements.

Friends will still be permitted to sail together — however, that pod will work together for the whole programme.

Single-handed sailing will be an important part of the programme, and small group sizes should enhance the learning opportunities. Children are also asked to come changed in wetsuits and head home in them.

Despite these adjustments, the INSS says it aims to keep the core aspects of the programme familiar, allowing for kids to have great fun afloat while learning and progressing one's sailing skills being the core elements — as the school’s video from earlier this summer shows.

For more details Saturday Sailing for juniors in the autumn and winter terms, see the INSS website HERE.

Published in INSS
Tagged under

The Irish RS Aero dinghy fleet grew by six over the last week and a half. The class now stands at over 20 boats and the Irish National Marine Services team handed over one of the demo boats for a trial only this morning.

“We are delighted to welcome the latest Aero sailors to the Irish Fleet. With 6 new boats launched this week and more on the way the class is set for great growth in 2020 - our new owners bring a great mix of fun, enthusiasm and great racing skills", says Brendan Foley Chairman RS Aero Ireland Association.

Recent additions to the class include Karl Leavy of Swords Sailing Club, who took possession of his new boat just in time for the lockdown to hit!

Karl receives his new RS Aero from RS Sailing dealer Kenneth RumballKarl (left) receives his new RS Aero from RS Sailing dealer Kenneth Rumball

Only last week Rob Hastings of Bosun Bob’s delivered a new boat to Andrew Baker, while Irish National Marine Services supplied Fireball Aces Noel Butler and Stephen Oram a new boat apiece while Philip Trickett and Charlotte O’Kelly show how the various rig options can allow the whole family get use of the same boat! And it was only on Sunday when Daragh Sherridan took possession of his new Aero.

3 new aeros arrive in DLThree new Aero dinghies arrive in Dun Laoghaire Harbour

Currently, a large portion of the Dun Laoghaire fleet is based at the Irish National Sailing & Powerboat School while the sailing clubs are moving the cruisers off the decks. Indeed many of Dun Laoghaire’s dinghy sailors can call the coal harbour slipway home for a week or two, with regular sightings of sailors based on the Eastern side getting a taste of the marina fairway and “Hell’s Gates”. Glyn Williams of the Irish National Sailing & Powerboat School has been on hand as a safety boat operator for the Aero class and reports “Everyone is taking the new social distancing measures in their stride which is certainly encouraging for more activity afloat”.

Temporary RS Aero Base nestled into the INSS patch in the Coal HarbourThe temporary RS Aero Dun Laoghaire base nestled into the INSS patch in the Coal Harbour

Noel Butler and Stephen Oran get afloat for the first timeFireball champions Noel Butler and Stephen Oram get afloat for the first time

It’s now full steam ahead for the RS Aero Irish Open rescheduled to Saturday 19th and Sunday 20th September. While there has been some speculation as to why the date was chosen given the Laser Masters will be running the same weekend, the explanation is really rather mundane, it was when the RS Aero charter fleet was available. Enquires for charter Aeros can be sent to Kenny Rumball, [email protected], or to [email protected]

The gang all headed out on Sunday afternoon, making the most of the weekend’s excellent weather, with class chairman Brendan Foley providing RIB support as they got to grips with the new boats in Scotsman’s Bay. Some footage of the occasion was captured!

RS Aeros set sail on Dublin Bay - Video

Published in RS Aero

The first in a series of short online courses at the Irish National Sailing & Powerboat School takes place this evening (Thursday) from 7 pm. Chief instructor Kenneth Rumball will be presenting a review of preparing a yacht for cruising or racing.

Next week, Kenneth will run a two-session course, on Tuesday 12th and Thursday 14th May running for two hours each evening covering “Skippering in Tidal Waters”. This course was specifically launched in response to feedback received by the school to their “Attitudes to Yacht Charter in Ireland” survey, where a number of respondents felt that Irish tides would be too much of a challenge compared to relatively easier waters of the Mediterranean.

The popular short course, Dinghy Race Tactics and Strategy, will run in an online format on Tuesday 12th, Wednesday 13th and Thursday 14th May for 2 hours each evening. Kenenth will lead the course and audience interaction and questions encouraged. Equally, although a camera or microphone is required to join - you can simply relax, view the slides and listen to the presenter as he explains both rules and strategy, and how it applies to real-life scenarios.

The courses are open to all, and everyone is welcome. Families are encouraged to all join in from one booking and the team at the school are looking forward to seeing everyone, even if only online for now!

Link to courses here

Published in INSS

The Irish National Sailing School (INSS) at Dun Laoghaire Harbour is taking the next steps to get domestic yacht charter up and running in the east coast port. 

Following a survey launched earlier in April, the INSS believes that there’s sufficient demand to have a domestic charter fleet up and running for August, on into the winter and ready for the 2021 season, driven in part by a reluctance to travel abroad caused by Coronavirus.

The school is making its two yachts available, however, capacity will quickly be met in light of the demand for the boats on the training courses. So, instead, they’re hoping that owners based on the East coast will work with them, on a profit share basis, with the school managing administration, handover, dealing with any issues during the charter and receiving the boat back and ensuring it's handed back to its owner in full working order as well as being spick and span!

The school, run by Kenneth Rumball, has been in contact with insurance providers, and upgrading cover is typically a small increase on premium. The owner would receive over half of the charter fee, and schemes in operation elsewhere usually cover the yachts annual running costs. Effectively it can be viewed as free annual boating.

Starting small, Rumball details how he sees the whole concept developing “Initially, we’d like to work with two or three owners based between Dun Laoghaire and Greystones. Interest from further afield is welcome”. The school’s survey indicates that boats in the 35-45 foot range are most likely to work in the Irish market.

A prospectus is available for interested yacht owners.

Rumball is keen to chat with any prospective owners. Tel: 01 2844195 or by email directly to [email protected]

Published in INSS

“Today we should be reporting on a fantastic first event for the RS Aero in Ireland. The Irish National Sailing & Powerboat School was due to host the inaugural RS Aero Open last Saturday 2nd and Sunday 3rd of May in Dun Laoghaire Harbour, with a strong fleet of over 20 boats from the UK, roughly 20 Irish boats and roughly 10 RS Aeros available for charter between RS Sailing and the Irish Supplier Irish National Marine Services”, laments Glyn Williams of the Irish National Sailing & Powerboat School.

The RS Aero calendar has, like everything, had to adapt to the coronavirus situation. The class has elected for a new date on Saturday 19th and Sunday 20th September, to fit into the currently remaining dates in the RS calendar, and the pressures on the RS Sailing Aero Charter Fleet, which is in hot demand across Europe later this year.

"sailing’s best bet for dealing with coronavirus is to get back to basics"

Irish RS Aero Class Chairman Brendan Foley is optimistic. “As we all look forward to emerging from our isolation from each other and the water, I am really excited by the number of questions I’ve been getting about the Aero. With a massive focus on single-handers, it looks like this year will be a real turning point for the Aero fleet in Ireland - if you are sitting on the fence and thinking about a new boat, go for it. It will be great for your mental health and well-being. I know I’m keen as mustard to get back out in my Aero. I would also ask prospective sailors to join the RS Aero Ireland Facebook group and the global Facebook group to see what a friendly and progressive fleet this is. I’m happy to answer any questions on the Aero - pop them on the comments below or PM me on Facebook. Stay calm, stay positive and get ready to sail!”

Back onshore, RS Sailing dealer, Kenneth Rumball has been preparing the three Aeros in the Irish National Marine Services stock. Kenneth reports a significant upturn in enquires about the boat since the lockdown began, something he attributes to the expected boom in single-handed dinghy sailing. “The Aero is perfect for those who are looking to get back into dinghies, the ergonomic hiking position, higher boom and centre mainsheet make sailing a breeze”. There are even a few lockdown discounts on the stock boats. The latest Aero ready to go 3187, is shown in the video below, and Kenneth points out the features making it an easy dinghy to get back afloat in.

 

Kenneth and Glyn feel that sailing’s best bet for dealing with coronavirus is to get back to basics. “Get out on the water and enjoy yourself, either in a single-handed dinghy, or with the family,” says Kenneth, while urging caution to do so responsibly. To this end, the Irish National Sailing & Powerboat School is going to make its COVID-19 single-handed dinghy operating procedure available for all to take ideas from. According to Glyn Williams “It's about ensuring that activity happens safely and that no one takes risks resulting in the need for Lifeboat or Coastguard intervention, exposing these volunteers to risk. We’re in the process of examining the risks, what control measures can be taken and how to manage any issues that arise in a manner that does not allow for disease spread”.

Both are hopeful that straightforward, sensible actions can facilitate a return to sailing and getting afloat to enjoy the water while we await a return to what could be considered a more normal set of activities.

Published in RS Aero
Tagged under

There’s a demand for short term, easily available yacht charter on Irish waters, that's according to a survey conducted earlier this month by a Dun Laoghaire Harbour Sailing School.

As Afloat reported previously, the Irish National Sailing & Powerboat School in Dun Laoghaire Harbour asked those who might usually head abroad for a charter holiday what their intentions were in light of the Covid-19 epidemic.

The main aim was to see what could be done to help the domestic marine industry and get a conversation going, with actions flowing quickly.

The concept was rooted in stimulating the domestic charter market especially as family activities on a yacht may be one of the few activities that can safely get afloat this year.

Between speaking to their previous graduates from the last few years, and with help from afloat magazine data and suggestions started coming in from a very short survey.

Over 40% of respondents indicate they would be less likely to travel overseas to charter, with more than 50% indicating they would be more likely to do so in Ireland. Commenting on the figures, Communications and Marketing Manager Glyn Williams describes them as “Hardly surprising, but being able to a figure on it is great, but equally, we got plenty of insight into what barriers there are to chartering yachts, as well as some brilliant suggestions”.

What Barriers Exist for the Irish Yacht Charter Market?

The school found that the top factor considered a barrier to chartering was the value for money proposition. Equally the yacht availability, flexibility on charter duration and the clear display of this information was raised.

"Biggest barrier to chartering was the value for money proposition"

Yacht and service quality ranked next and tied into the value for money question. According to school chief instructor Kenneth Rumball, “Undoubtedly, professional management and rapid support will deal with many of these concerns, as it’s very unlikely the Irish industry would match the age and cycling of vessels in more established charter destinations”.

Yacht Charter survey(Above and below) results from the INSS Yacht Charter survey taken during the COVID-19 epidemic

Yacht Charter results2

Perceptions of skipper’s own knowledge gaps was the next most common concern. We’re competing against destinations with well-established routes, excellent marina networks and more importantly, no tides. The school is well placed here to help, according to Kenneth “training is our business, this is something we propose to address with short theory courses and tailored client support”.

Interestingly, the gaps in the marina network didn’t feature as a major concern according to Glyn. “There’s a demand for short term, easy entry charter. This doesn’t take away from calls for more infrastructure development around our coast but shows that we can grow this concept with what’s already available”.

By this stage of this article, you’re probably screaming at your screen “What about the weather!”. Glyn’s response, “Well, it certainly came up, but not nearly as much as you’d have guessed. Instead, it was framed in terms of value for money and what could be offered by providers to accommodate the Irish climate”.

What’s next?

When asked about developing the concept from the school’s perspective, Kenneth is optimistic. “We train about 300 yacht graduates each year, and the vast majority do the course to access the charter lifestyle. With some clever and targeted supports, we can easily convince those to holiday at home, especially when personal skills development can be listed as a benefit alongside spending time with the family, or partner”.

Rumball feels collaboration will be important. “We’ve already got a great relationship with James Lyons from Sovereign Sailing, and we’ll continue working together behind the scenes to advance the concept”. Other interested parties are invited to get in touch with the school.

Moving forward, the school is calling for interested yacht owners who may be interested in working with the school to expand the concept on the East Coast. Profit-share arrangements work elsewhere, participating owners typically cover all annual costs, from insurance, mooring fees and ongoing maintenance. Rumball characterises it as essentially free yachting for the owner and proposes a concept where the Irish National Sailing & Powerboat School would manage bookings, administration, maintenance and all the logistics. The school has already been in contact with prospective insurers and has found premiums only typically rise around 40% to cover the charter element.

Owners can contact Kenneth Rumball by email, [email protected], or call the school’s office on 01 284 4195 for more details and a full breakdown of the proposals.

Published in INSS
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About Dublin Port 

Dublin Port is Ireland’s largest and busiest port with approximately 17,000 vessel movements per year. As well as being the country’s largest port, Dublin Port has the highest rate of growth and, in the seven years to 2019, total cargo volumes grew by 36.1%.

The vision of Dublin Port Company is to have the required capacity to service the needs of its customers and the wider economy safely, efficiently and sustainably. Dublin Port will integrate with the City by enhancing the natural and built environments. The Port is being developed in line with Masterplan 2040.

Dublin Port Company is currently investing about €277 million on its Alexandra Basin Redevelopment (ABR), which is due to be complete by 2021. The redevelopment will improve the port's capacity for large ships by deepening and lengthening 3km of its 7km of berths. The ABR is part of a €1bn capital programme up to 2028, which will also include initial work on the Dublin Port’s MP2 Project - a major capital development project proposal for works within the existing port lands in the northeastern part of the port.

Dublin Port has also recently secured planning approval for the development of the next phase of its inland port near Dublin Airport. The latest stage of the inland port will include a site with the capacity to store more than 2,000 shipping containers and infrastructures such as an ESB substation, an office building and gantry crane.

Dublin Port Company recently submitted a planning application for a €320 million project that aims to provide significant additional capacity at the facility within the port in order to cope with increases in trade up to 2040. The scheme will see a new roll-on/roll-off jetty built to handle ferries of up to 240 metres in length, as well as the redevelopment of an oil berth into a deep-water container berth.

Dublin Port FAQ

Dublin was little more than a monastic settlement until the Norse invasion in the 8th and 9th centuries when they selected the Liffey Estuary as their point of entry to the country as it provided relatively easy access to the central plains of Ireland. Trading with England and Europe followed which required port facilities, so the development of Dublin Port is inextricably linked to the development of Dublin City, so it is fair to say the origins of the Port go back over one thousand years. As a result, the modern organisation Dublin Port has a long and remarkable history, dating back over 300 years from 1707.

The original Port of Dublin was situated upriver, a few miles from its current location near the modern Civic Offices at Wood Quay and close to Christchurch Cathedral. The Port remained close to that area until the new Custom House opened in the 1790s. In medieval times Dublin shipped cattle hides to Britain and the continent, and the returning ships carried wine, pottery and other goods.

510 acres. The modern Dublin Port is located either side of the River Liffey, out to its mouth. On the north side of the river, the central part (205 hectares or 510 acres) of the Port lies at the end of East Wall and North Wall, from Alexandra Quay.

Dublin Port Company is a State-owned commercial company responsible for operating and developing Dublin Port.

Dublin Port Company is a self-financing, and profitable private limited company wholly-owned by the State, whose business is to manage Dublin Port, Ireland's premier Port. Established as a corporate entity in 1997, Dublin Port Company is responsible for the management, control, operation and development of the Port.

Captain William Bligh (of Mutiny of the Bounty fame) was a visitor to Dublin in 1800, and his visit to the capital had a lasting effect on the Port. Bligh's study of the currents in Dublin Bay provided the basis for the construction of the North Wall. This undertaking led to the growth of Bull Island to its present size.

Yes. Dublin Port is the largest freight and passenger port in Ireland. It handles almost 50% of all trade in the Republic of Ireland.

All cargo handling activities being carried out by private sector companies operating in intensely competitive markets within the Port. Dublin Port Company provides world-class facilities, services, accommodation and lands in the harbour for ships, goods and passengers.

Eamonn O'Reilly is the Dublin Port Chief Executive.

Capt. Michael McKenna is the Dublin Port Harbour Master

In 2019, 1,949,229 people came through the Port.

In 2019, there were 158 cruise liner visits.

In 2019, 9.4 million gross tonnes of exports were handled by Dublin Port.

In 2019, there were 7,898 ship arrivals.

In 2019, there was a gross tonnage of 38.1 million.

In 2019, there were 559,506 tourist vehicles.

There were 98,897 lorries in 2019

Boats can navigate the River Liffey into Dublin by using the navigational guidelines. Find the guidelines on this page here.

VHF channel 12. Commercial vessels using Dublin Port or Dun Laoghaire Port typically have a qualified pilot or certified master with proven local knowledge on board. They "listen out" on VHF channel 12 when in Dublin Port's jurisdiction.

A Dublin Bay webcam showing the south of the Bay at Dun Laoghaire and a distant view of Dublin Port Shipping is here
Dublin Port is creating a distributed museum on its lands in Dublin City.
 A Liffey Tolka Project cycle and pedestrian way is the key to link the elements of this distributed museum together.  The distributed museum starts at the Diving Bell and, over the course of 6.3km, will give Dubliners a real sense of the City, the Port and the Bay.  For visitors, it will be a unique eye-opening stroll and vista through and alongside one of Europe’s busiest ports:  Diving Bell along Sir John Rogerson’s Quay over the Samuel Beckett Bridge, past the Scherzer Bridge and down the North Wall Quay campshire to Berth 18 - 1.2 km.   Liffey Tolka Project - Tree-lined pedestrian and cycle route between the River Liffey and the Tolka Estuary - 1.4 km with a 300-metre spur along Alexandra Road to The Pumphouse (to be completed by Q1 2021) and another 200 metres to The Flour Mill.   Tolka Estuary Greenway - Construction of Phase 1 (1.9 km) starts in December 2020 and will be completed by Spring 2022.  Phase 2 (1.3 km) will be delivered within the following five years.  The Pumphouse is a heritage zone being created as part of the Alexandra Basin Redevelopment Project.  The first phase of 1.6 acres will be completed in early 2021 and will include historical port equipment and buildings and a large open space for exhibitions and performances.  It will be expanded in a subsequent phase to incorporate the Victorian Graving Dock No. 1 which will be excavated and revealed. 
 The largest component of the distributed museum will be The Flour Mill.  This involves the redevelopment of the former Odlums Flour Mill on Alexandra Road based on a masterplan completed by Grafton Architects to provide a mix of port operational uses, a National Maritime Archive, two 300 seat performance venues, working and studio spaces for artists and exhibition spaces.   The Flour Mill will be developed in stages over the remaining twenty years of Masterplan 2040 alongside major port infrastructure projects.

Source: Dublin Port Company ©Afloat 2020. 

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