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Displaying items by tag: Maritime Institute of Ireland

#MaritimeInstitute - The AGM of the Maritime Institute of Ireland, whose patron is President Michael D. Higgins, is to be held next Saturday 18 October in the institute's National Maritime Museum of Ireland, Dun Laoghaire.

Members of the M.I.I are invited to attend the AGM which starts at 12 noon. The museum located in the former Mariner's Church is where 14 of its parishioners were killed in World War I and this will be acknowledged during the meeting.

The museum which is open to members free of charge is also open to the public, where in addition to the many diverse and interesting exhibits on display, there is a library, souvenir gift shop and café.

In recent years the museum underwent a major refursbishment, for a 3D tour of the museum click HERE. To activate, click on map to launch 3D interactive viewing. For further information about the visitor attraction visit: www.mariner.ie

Published in Boating Fixtures

#MUSEUM CONCERT – Getting into the festive spirit on Saturday 1 December will be a concert of opera choruses, folk songs Christmas music and distinguished soloists performed by "Il Coro Italiano di Dublino" in the National Maritime Museum of Ireland, Dun Laoghaire.

Il Coro Italiano di Dublino was founded in 1986 by Dr. Rosa Maria Chicco-Ferraro, Deputy Head of Mission at the Italian Embassy in Dublin at that time. The present name of the choir was adopted in 2002.

Tickets cost €10 each for the concert that starts at 7.30pm in the renovated surroundings of the former Mariners Church. For further events and daytime visiting hours (including Mondays) of the museum visit: www.mariner.ie

Published in Boating Fixtures

#MUSEUM AGM - The Maritime Institute of Ireland's AGM is to take place on Saturday 6 October in the National Maritime Museum of Ireland, in Dun Laoghaire, writes Jehan Ashmore.

The museum which is housed in the former Old Mariners Church was re-opened in April after several years of closure so to carry out an extensive renovation and modernisation programme.

The M.I.I. fosters an appreciation of Irish maritime heritage and through operating the museum, they also host lectures, issue newsletters, host and support commemorations, conduct research and publish papers. In addition they intend to re-instate a library which includes an impressive collection of Lloyds Register of Shipping volumes.

The institute is a totally voluntary body, without regular finance from any quarter. New members are welcome as are volunteers. For information including how to make a voluntary donation visit: www.mariner.ie

Published in Boating Fixtures

#MARINE HERITAGE – Up and down the country, events are been held for the annual National Heritage Week including a series of maritime lectures as previously reported on Afloat.ie

Below is a full detailed description of the varied topics of the lecture programme which is to be held in the Dun Laoghaire Club, Eblana Avenue (off Marine Road) on the final day (Sunday 26th August) of the heritage week.

12 noon The 'Kowloon Bridge' and her sisters – by Garda Diver Peter Brady.

1.15 pm A West of Ireland view of the Battle of the Atlantic – by Dr. Michael Kennedy, Royal Irish Academy.

3.00 pm Early navigation in Ireland / maritime archaeology of Sligo harbour and bay.- by Auriel Robinson DAHG.

4.15 pm Captain Bligh and Dublin Bay- speaker, Terry Cummins of the Irish Naval Association.

6.00 pm The greatest naval catastrophe in England's history-concealed throughout history by Elizabethan propaganda historiography.

This lecture is to be presented by special guest speaker; Dr. Luis Gorrochategui Santos – who is visiting Ireland especially for the heritage week lectures organised by the Maritime Institute of Ireland (M.I.I.) which runs the National Maritime Museum of Ireland.

For further information about the day's lecture contact Barney Yourell on 087 9007466                                                                                                         

Admission is free, noting there is a recommended donation of €10

Published in Boating Fixtures
29th May 2012

Titanic In Song

#TITANIC IN SONG – A musical evening 'Titanic in Song' by Dara MacMahon and Gerry Noonan accompanied by Pauline Cooper will be held in the National Maritime Museum of Ireland, Dun Laoghaire on Friday 15th June. Tickets cost €10 each and the event starts at 8 o'clock.

Explore the Titanic story through the songs heard and played by the passengers on the ship. From the light classical and musical comedy numbers familiar to the 1st and 2nd class passengers to the music hall, vaudeville and Irish songs popular in steerage. The evening will present a unique look at the music played on that fateful journey.

The museum which is run by volunteers and members of the Maritime Institute of Ireland was re-opened last month after years of renovation work was carried out at the former Old Mariners Church. For further information and on the museum and its activities visit www.mariner.ie

Published in Titanic

#LECTURE – A lecture about the sinking of HMS Thetis will be held in the Dun Laoghaire Club, 3 Eblana Avenue next Monday 14th May. The talk will be presented by David Roberts MA -BBC marine presenter.

Roberts will tell the story of the 1939 submarine disaster in Liverpool Bay when 99 men were left to die while carrying out trials. In addition about the delays, mistakes and indecision of the disgraceful cover-up by the Churchill Government and the shocking treatment of those who were left behind.

Standard tickets cost €10 and €5 for concessions and to members of the Maritime Institute of Ireland (M.I.I.). Tickets can be purchased from their maritime museum shop which is on the top (3rd floor) of the Dun Laoghaire Shopping Centre. For further information Tel: 01-2143964 or 085-7528737 and in general about the maritime museum visit www.mariner.ie

Published in Boating Fixtures

#EVENTS – The annual commemoration for those who have no grave but the sea, will be held in Belfast next Sunday 13th May.

The event is to be hosted by the Merchant Navy Association of Northern Ireland and where members of the Maritime Institute of Ireland based in Dun Laoghaire's Maritime Museum which opened a month ago, are due to attend.

Those intending to travel to the commemoration are invited to contact the museum's shop which is located on the top (3rd floor) of the Dun Laoghaire Shopping Centre.

For further information about the M.I.I. and the museum visit www.mariner.ie

Published in Boating Fixtures

#TITANIC 100 – In this centenary week of the sinking of RMS Titanic a talk and musical tribute will be held in memory of the disaster this evening (8 pm) in the newly opened maritime museum in Dun Laoghaire as previously reported on Afloat.ie.

Deep-sea diver Rory Golden became the first Irishman to see the wreck of the Titanic and he will present an illustrated lecture. The musical tribute will be led by uillinn piper Eamon Galdubh – where similar music will be aired to that played in the 2nd and 3rd class compartments on the Titanic.

In addition the Maritime Institute of Ireland (M.I.I.) which runs the museum will run its final lecture for the season next week. The lecture 'Titanic -Locked in History' which will be held next Thursday (19th April) at 8pm in the Stella Maris Seafarers Club in Dublin city-centre and is to be presented by Michael O'Flaherty.

For information on both the Titanic Tribute evening (tickets cost €10) call 087 900 7466  and by also viewing the website which includes details about  next week's admission free lecture visit: www.mariner.ie

Published in Titanic

#MARTIME MUSEUM AT EASTER - Earlier this week Dun Laoghaire's maritime museum re-opened its doors to the public after a €4m renovation project was carried out on the apt venue of the former Mariners Church, which incidentally closed on this Easter Day forty years ago, writes Jehan Ashmore.

With a new lease of life the extensively renovated and upgraded museum can look forward to a future. Visitors enter the museum at a new entrance, where in the reception foyer there is a souvenir shop, beyond that in the main body or nave are exhibits displayed, each telling a story and for children there is a Knott Station. To view the initial exhibits on display, click HERE.

In addition there is new facility in the form of a café, which was much needed and where two new stained -glass windows by Peadar Lamb feature, they were sponsored by the Dun Laoghaire Harbour Company. As for the original stained-class windows they were restored to their full glory.

The renovation began in 2006 and was funded by the Government which led to a three-phrased project that involved work carried out from the re-roofing right down to the floorboards. Walls were re-plastered, electric systems modernised and wheel chair-lift and ramps installed.

Work also took place to clean the exterior of the stone-cut granite building hewn from Dalkey Quarry and which led to the consecration of the Kingstown Episcopalian Mariners Church in 1843.

After many generations of mariners and their families, parish numbers dwindled and its use as place worship ended on Easter Sunday 1972. The Maritime Institute of Ireland which runs the museum relocated two years later having had a smaller museum sited along the town's harbour waterfront.

For the next three decades the museum which has attracted locals and visitors from home and overseas, eventually had to close due to deteriorating conditions of an aging building.

Now that the museum is up and running, the M.I.I. which is staffed by volunteers has in recent years also had the support of a FAS scheme of workers, which according to the institute have been invaluable.

The museum is open 11am to 5pm Tuesday to Sunday and every Bank Holiday, for further information visit: www.mariner.ie


Published in Dublin Bay

#MARITIME MUSEUM REOPENING – It is good to report positive news, particularly the much awaited reopening of the Maritime Institute of Ireland's maritime museum in Dun Laoghaire, which is to take place today, writes Jehan Ashmore.

Since 2006, the museum secured vital Government grants to undertake repair, renovation and improvement works of the former Church of Ireland church built in 1837 which could accommodate up to 1,400 people. Due to dwindling parish numbers the church closed on Easter Sunday 1972 and two years later the museum moved in.

Over the next three decades visitors enjoyed the unique and apt setting of the former Mariners Church. However as the years rolled the structure of the building was in need of urgent attention which led to the closure in 2004.

The extensive work has included the replacement of the roof, treatment of dry rot, repointing and cleaning of the stonework, replaced plasterwork, repair of the stained glass windows, installation of new lighting and heating systems and wheelchair accessibility provided.

Initially the museum will only use the ground floor, having said that a new layout is presented with several 'stories' centred around these exhibits, to read more about the exhibits click HERE.

In addition children will be entertained by a Knot Station and there is to be a souvenir shop and coffee dock. Opening hours are 11am to 5pm Tuesday to Sunday, including Bank Holidays, for further information visit: www.mariner.ie

The Maritime Institute of Ireland celebrated its 70th anniversary last year, and was established primarily to highlight the importance of an Irish mercantile fleet, the role of ports and shipping, fishing and to recognise and foster our maritime heritage.

Members can join the Institute with the benefits of accessing the museum (covering admission) runs a lecture programme, issue newsletters, host and support commemorations and conducts research. As a voluntary organisation they also welcome new recruits.

The instiute's patron is President Michael D. Higgins who is to officially reopen the museum in early June.

Published in Dublin Bay
Page 1 of 4

About Dublin Port 

Dublin Port is Ireland’s largest and busiest port with approximately 17,000 vessel movements per year. As well as being the country’s largest port, Dublin Port has the highest rate of growth and, in the seven years to 2019, total cargo volumes grew by 36.1%.

The vision of Dublin Port Company is to have the required capacity to service the needs of its customers and the wider economy safely, efficiently and sustainably. Dublin Port will integrate with the City by enhancing the natural and built environments. The Port is being developed in line with Masterplan 2040.

Dublin Port Company is currently investing about €277 million on its Alexandra Basin Redevelopment (ABR), which is due to be complete by 2021. The redevelopment will improve the port's capacity for large ships by deepening and lengthening 3km of its 7km of berths. The ABR is part of a €1bn capital programme up to 2028, which will also include initial work on the Dublin Port’s MP2 Project - a major capital development project proposal for works within the existing port lands in the northeastern part of the port.

Dublin Port has also recently secured planning approval for the development of the next phase of its inland port near Dublin Airport. The latest stage of the inland port will include a site with the capacity to store more than 2,000 shipping containers and infrastructures such as an ESB substation, an office building and gantry crane.

Dublin Port Company recently submitted a planning application for a €320 million project that aims to provide significant additional capacity at the facility within the port in order to cope with increases in trade up to 2040. The scheme will see a new roll-on/roll-off jetty built to handle ferries of up to 240 metres in length, as well as the redevelopment of an oil berth into a deep-water container berth.

Dublin Port FAQ

Dublin was little more than a monastic settlement until the Norse invasion in the 8th and 9th centuries when they selected the Liffey Estuary as their point of entry to the country as it provided relatively easy access to the central plains of Ireland. Trading with England and Europe followed which required port facilities, so the development of Dublin Port is inextricably linked to the development of Dublin City, so it is fair to say the origins of the Port go back over one thousand years. As a result, the modern organisation Dublin Port has a long and remarkable history, dating back over 300 years from 1707.

The original Port of Dublin was situated upriver, a few miles from its current location near the modern Civic Offices at Wood Quay and close to Christchurch Cathedral. The Port remained close to that area until the new Custom House opened in the 1790s. In medieval times Dublin shipped cattle hides to Britain and the continent, and the returning ships carried wine, pottery and other goods.

510 acres. The modern Dublin Port is located either side of the River Liffey, out to its mouth. On the north side of the river, the central part (205 hectares or 510 acres) of the Port lies at the end of East Wall and North Wall, from Alexandra Quay.

Dublin Port Company is a State-owned commercial company responsible for operating and developing Dublin Port.

Dublin Port Company is a self-financing, and profitable private limited company wholly-owned by the State, whose business is to manage Dublin Port, Ireland's premier Port. Established as a corporate entity in 1997, Dublin Port Company is responsible for the management, control, operation and development of the Port.

Captain William Bligh (of Mutiny of the Bounty fame) was a visitor to Dublin in 1800, and his visit to the capital had a lasting effect on the Port. Bligh's study of the currents in Dublin Bay provided the basis for the construction of the North Wall. This undertaking led to the growth of Bull Island to its present size.

Yes. Dublin Port is the largest freight and passenger port in Ireland. It handles almost 50% of all trade in the Republic of Ireland.

All cargo handling activities being carried out by private sector companies operating in intensely competitive markets within the Port. Dublin Port Company provides world-class facilities, services, accommodation and lands in the harbour for ships, goods and passengers.

Eamonn O'Reilly is the Dublin Port Chief Executive.

Capt. Michael McKenna is the Dublin Port Harbour Master

In 2019, 1,949,229 people came through the Port.

In 2019, there were 158 cruise liner visits.

In 2019, 9.4 million gross tonnes of exports were handled by Dublin Port.

In 2019, there were 7,898 ship arrivals.

In 2019, there was a gross tonnage of 38.1 million.

In 2019, there were 559,506 tourist vehicles.

There were 98,897 lorries in 2019

Boats can navigate the River Liffey into Dublin by using the navigational guidelines. Find the guidelines on this page here.

VHF channel 12. Commercial vessels using Dublin Port or Dun Laoghaire Port typically have a qualified pilot or certified master with proven local knowledge on board. They "listen out" on VHF channel 12 when in Dublin Port's jurisdiction.

A Dublin Bay webcam showing the south of the Bay at Dun Laoghaire and a distant view of Dublin Port Shipping is here
Dublin Port is creating a distributed museum on its lands in Dublin City.
 A Liffey Tolka Project cycle and pedestrian way is the key to link the elements of this distributed museum together.  The distributed museum starts at the Diving Bell and, over the course of 6.3km, will give Dubliners a real sense of the City, the Port and the Bay.  For visitors, it will be a unique eye-opening stroll and vista through and alongside one of Europe’s busiest ports:  Diving Bell along Sir John Rogerson’s Quay over the Samuel Beckett Bridge, past the Scherzer Bridge and down the North Wall Quay campshire to Berth 18 - 1.2 km.   Liffey Tolka Project - Tree-lined pedestrian and cycle route between the River Liffey and the Tolka Estuary - 1.4 km with a 300-metre spur along Alexandra Road to The Pumphouse (to be completed by Q1 2021) and another 200 metres to The Flour Mill.   Tolka Estuary Greenway - Construction of Phase 1 (1.9 km) starts in December 2020 and will be completed by Spring 2022.  Phase 2 (1.3 km) will be delivered within the following five years.  The Pumphouse is a heritage zone being created as part of the Alexandra Basin Redevelopment Project.  The first phase of 1.6 acres will be completed in early 2021 and will include historical port equipment and buildings and a large open space for exhibitions and performances.  It will be expanded in a subsequent phase to incorporate the Victorian Graving Dock No. 1 which will be excavated and revealed. 
 The largest component of the distributed museum will be The Flour Mill.  This involves the redevelopment of the former Odlums Flour Mill on Alexandra Road based on a masterplan completed by Grafton Architects to provide a mix of port operational uses, a National Maritime Archive, two 300 seat performance venues, working and studio spaces for artists and exhibition spaces.   The Flour Mill will be developed in stages over the remaining twenty years of Masterplan 2040 alongside major port infrastructure projects.

Source: Dublin Port Company ©Afloat 2020. 

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