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Displaying items by tag: Navigation

Dublin Bay Sailing Club in conjunction with Dublin Port will present a navigation talk at the next ‘Speaker Supper’ on Friday 21 February.

Patrick Cafferky will give the talk on ‘Marine and Navigation Safety from a Marine Pilot’s Perspective’ in the National Yacht Club dining room from 8.30pm, following supper at 7.30pm sharp.

The meal is €25 a head and all waterfront clubs are welcome to attend. To book please contact Tim at [email protected], Louise or Kristyna at [email protected] or phone 01 280 5725.

Published in DBSC

#HowToSail - Next month Howth Yacht Club will host a two-day course on essential navigation and seamanship for cruising in coastal waters.

Run on Saturday 13 and Sunday 14 October, the course is touted as the ideal introduction to the essential knowledge required to plan and safely undertake short cruising passages in coastal waters.

The "concise yet highly informative" course is geared towards skippers and crew who are new to cruising, but is equally suitable for sailing yachts, motorboats, RIBs, divers and sea anglers.

The course will include:

  • Charts and chart work
  • Safety
  • Navigation buoys and lights
  • ‘Rules of the Road’
  • Tides
  • Weather
  • Passage planning and pilotage
  • Modern methods of electronic navigation

Presented by David Jerrard of Sea-Craft, the course runs from 9.30am to 5.30pm each day in HYC. The course fee is €120 which includes the full course pack and documentation.

The course is open to both club members and non-members so feel free to bring along a friend or colleague.

For more details and booking information, contact [email protected] or phone Sea-Craft at 01 286 3362 anytime.

Published in Howth YC
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The deck lights used by cruise ships have been identified as a potential navigation risk at sea at night, in the investigation of a complaint by a yacht Skipper following an encounter with a cruise vessel, writes Tom MacSweeney.

It was investigated by the CHIRP Maritime organisation, the British (UK) Confidential Reporting Programme for Maritime incidents. The aim of CHIRP is to contribute to the enhancement of maritime safety worldwide. It says that it provides “a totally independent confidential (not anonymous) reporting system for all individuals employed in the maritime industry. It provides a similar aviation system.

The yacht Skipper reported to CHRIP that it was difficult to distinguish navigation lights amongst other deck lights:

“I was under sail in a Southerly direction when I saw the lights of another vessel off my starboard bow.” Endeavouring to keep clear “the relative tracks didn’t seem, to make sense if I was seeing what I thought was a green starboard navigation light.”

The vessel was a cruise ship which crossed a mile ahead, going from East to West.

“I should therefore, have been able to see the port navigation light, but could not convince myself there was a red light amongst the multitude of other lights visible on the cruise liner.”

As the vessels were both a safe distance from each other, there was no harm, but the amount of coloured lights on cruise ships has been identified as an issue needing attention.

The yacht Skipper said: “The Collision Regulations specify the minimum visibility of navigation lights. However, the impact of other bright lights, obscuring the navigation lights, is not appreciated. Vessels should ensure that their navigation lights are bright enough to be seen against the background of all their other lights and avoid using coloured deck lights where this can cause confusion. Very bright deck working lights obscuring navigation lights are often an issue on fishing boats as well.”

The CHIRP investigation comment said: “The Maritime Advisory Board highlighted the importance of taking a series of compass bearings in order to determine whether a risk of collision exists Navigation light visibility, irrespective of other lighting, must comply with COL REGS.

“They queried why classification societies permit these designs where visibility is obscured. Technology exists whereby deck lighting may be adequately shaded – permitting safe movement on board, yet not obscuring regulatory lights. The quality of lights bulbs used is another possible consideration. Take LED for example – are approved suppliers holding the introduction of these back due to a lack of any requirement in COLREGS?”

Published in Cruise Liners
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#InlandWaters - Waterways Ireland advises masters and users of the Shannon Navigation that a new green conical navigation aid has been placed north of Inch Macdermot Island in Lough Ree between the green perch and the green can buoy, as shown on the guide above.

Published in Inland Waterways

#Offshore - Just in time for the release of Disney’s new seafaring adventure Moana comes this National Geographic profile of a team of sailors recreating the incredible navigations of Polynesian boats that inspired the animated film.

The crew of the Hōkūle‘a sail the ocean with nothing but the sun and the stars to guide them — even watches are banned.

And the Hawaiian team have been doing it since the mid 1970s, on a mission to prove their Polynesian ancestors were master navigators of the vast expanse of the Pacific.

They’ve since rekindled a long-lost seafaring tradition across the Polynesian islands, and have set their sights on completing an audacious 60,000-nautical-mile round-the-world voyage that they began in 2013, all on an open-deck double-hulled voyaging canoe.

National Geographic has more on the story HERE.

Published in Offshore
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#MarineNotice - Marine Notice No 4 of 2016 advises of the risks inherent in the use of unlicensed electronic navigation systems and cautions against their use.

Unlicensed software and electronic charts may contain errors, resulting in inaccuracies in displayed information and indicated vessel position. Such unlicensed software should not be used for navigation purposes.

Vessel operators are reminded of the requirement to carry suitable nautical instruments and adequate and up-to-date charts for their intended voyages. All equipment fitted in compliance with shipborne navigational equipment regulations should be type approved.

The installation and use of unlicensed navigational systems and software on-board commercial vessels may invalidate a vessel’s certification and may also lead to the cancelation of a vessel’s certificates.

If in doubt, vessel owners/operators should confirm with their suppliers that their software is up to date and licensed.

Published in Marine Warning

#deadcow – Round–the–World Yachtsman and Afloat.ie reader Pat Murphy says he enjoyed our story about the weekend rescue of a cow by the RNLI in Waterford. Unfortunately, Pat and his wife Olivia related a tale where they came across another cow in the same area (above) that was not so lucky. 'We came across him/her about six miles south of Hook Head while on passage from Waterford to Padstow in Cornwall on August Monday last in our yacht Aldebaran', Pat told Afloat.ie.

'I reported it to Rosslare Coastguard Radio as a navigational hazard. It was so bloated I think that to make contact with it could result in a not very nice shower!' he said.

Published in Cruising
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#InlandWaters - Despite the threat of floods amid the current weather warning, the recent extended period of dry weather has meant that water levels in Ireland's navigable inland waterways are lower than normal for this time of year.

Where water levels fall below normal summer levels, Waterways Ireland says masters should be aware that their vessels may be at risk of grounding, particularly deep drafted vessels.

To reduce this risk, masters should navigate where possible on or near the centreline of the channel and also avoid short cutting in dog-legged channels and navigating too close to navigation markers.

Proceeding at a slow speed will also reduce 'squat' effect, ie where the vessel tends to sit lower in the water as a consequence of higher speed.

Low water levels will also impact on slipways, with reduced slipway length available under the water surface and the possibility of launching trailers dropping off the end of the concrete apron onto the river/lake bed and causing damage to trailer, outboard motor or boat.

More slipway surface will also be susceptible to weed growth requiring care while engaged in launching boats.

Very dry riverbanks are more susceptible to erosion from vessel wash. Waterways Ireland asks masters to ensure they adhere to the speed limits and maintain a reduced wash.

Where appropriate by maximising on the number of vessels in a lock the total volume of water moving downstream is decreased. This also reduces the volume of water used.

Waterways Ireland asks users to be patient and wait for other boaters to share the lock rather than using locks for single passages.

Masters are also requested to make sure lock cycles are used for vessels travelling each way. Each lock cycle should take boats both up and down stream. All sluice gates and paddles should be shut when leaving a lock.

In addition, masters are reminded not to leave taps running at watering points or service blocks in the interest of water conservation.

Published in Inland Waterways
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#HowToNavigate - A new revised edition of bestselling sailing guide Learn to Navigate continues its reputation as the accessible, no-nonsense guide for every boater.

Basil Mosenthal and Barry Pickthall take the reader through every step, from reading charts to understanding tides and much more, giving even novice sailors a sound practical basis in navigation.

Learn to Navigate is available now via Amazon and all good nautical booksellers.

Published in Book Review
Tagged under

#Navigation - The United States' National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) has announced that it will cease publication of paper nautical charts in six months' time, according to Sail magazine.

Since the first maps charting the US coastline were published in the 1860s, the NOAA's Office of Coast Survey has been producing accurate and highly detailed charts to help all kinds of mariners find safe passage through American waters, from fishing vessels to merchant ships to cruising yachts.

But with the majority of ocean-goers now relying on GPS and other modern technologies, the use of paper nautical charts was seen as falling by the wayside by the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), which took over the production of US charts in 1999.

Yet while printed nautical charts may now become the preserve of specialised cartographers like Bobby Nash, who designed a special classic chart for the Volvo Ocean Race finale in Galway last year, the NOAA will still be providing its ocean maps by electronic means via data or high-res PDFs.

Sail magazine has more on the story HERE.

Published in Cruising
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About Dublin Port 

Dublin Port Company is currently investing about €277 million on its Alexandra Basin Redevelopment (ABR), which is due to be complete by 2021. The redevelopment will improve the port's capacity for large ships by deepening and lengthening 3km of its 7km of berths. The ABR is part of a €1bn capital programme up to 2028, which will also include initial work on the Dublin Port’s MP2 Project - a major capital development project proposal for works within the existing port lands in the northeastern part of the port.

Dublin Port has also recently secured planning approval for the development of the next phase of its inland port near Dublin Airport. The latest stage of the inland port will include a site with the capacity to store more than 2,000 shipping containers and infrastructures such as an ESB substation, an office building and gantry crane.

Dublin Port Company recently submitted a planning application for a €320 million project that aims to provide significant additional capacity at the facility within the port in order to cope with increases in trade up to 2040. The scheme will see a new roll-on/roll-off jetty built to handle ferries of up to 240 metres in length, as well as the redevelopment of an oil berth into a deep-water container berth.

Dublin Port FAQ

Dublin was little more than a monastic settlement until the Norse invasion in the 8th and 9th centuries when they selected the Liffey Estuary as their point of entry to the country as it provided relatively easy access to the central plains of Ireland. Trading with England and Europe followed which required port facilities, so the development of Dublin Port is inextricably linked to the development of Dublin City, so it is fair to say the origins of the Port go back over one thousand years. As a result, the modern organisation Dublin Port has a long and remarkable history, dating back over 300 years from 1707.

The original Port of Dublin was situated upriver, a few miles from its current location near the modern Civic Offices at Wood Quay and close to Christchurch Cathedral. The Port remained close to that area until the new Custom House opened in the 1790s. In medieval times Dublin shipped cattle hides to Britain and the continent, and the returning ships carried wine, pottery and other goods.

510 acres. The modern Dublin Port is located either side of the River Liffey, out to its mouth. On the north side of the river, the central part (205 hectares or 510 acres) of the Port lies at the end of East Wall and North Wall, from Alexandra Quay.

Dublin Port Company is a State-owned commercial company responsible for operating and developing Dublin Port.

Dublin Port Company is a self-financing, and profitable private limited company wholly-owned by the State, whose business is to manage Dublin Port, Ireland's premier Port. Established as a corporate entity in 1997, Dublin Port Company is responsible for the management, control, operation and development of the Port.

Captain William Bligh (of Mutiny of the Bounty fame) was a visitor to Dublin in 1800, and his visit to the capital had a lasting effect on the Port. Bligh's study of the currents in Dublin Bay provided the basis for the construction of the North Wall. This undertaking led to the growth of Bull Island to its present size.

Yes. Dublin Port is the largest freight and passenger port in Ireland. It handles almost 50% of all trade in the Republic of Ireland.

All cargo handling activities being carried out by private sector companies operating in intensely competitive markets within the Port. Dublin Port Company provides world-class facilities, services, accommodation and lands in the harbour for ships, goods and passengers.

Eamonn O'Reilly is the Dublin Port Chief Executive.

Capt. Michael McKenna is the Dublin Port Harbour Master

In 2019, 1,949,229 people came through the Port.

In 2019, there were 158 cruise liner visits.

In 2019, 9.4 million gross tonnes of exports were handled by Dublin Port.

In 2019, there were 7,898 ship arrivals.

In 2019, there was a gross tonnage of 38.1 million.

In 2019, there were 559,506 tourist vehicles.

There were 98,897 lorries in 2019

Boats can navigate the River Liffey into Dublin by using the navigational guidelines. Find the guidelines on this page here.

VHF channel 12. Commercial vessels using Dublin Port or Dun Laoghaire Port typically have a qualified pilot or certified master with proven local knowledge on board. They "listen out" on VHF channel 12 when in Dublin Port's jurisdiction.

A Dublin Bay webcam showing the south of the Bay at Dun Laoghaire and a distant view of Dublin Port Shipping is here
Dublin Port is creating a distributed museum on its lands in Dublin City.
 A Liffey Tolka Project cycle and pedestrian way is the key to link the elements of this distributed museum together.  The distributed museum starts at the Diving Bell and, over the course of 6.3km, will give Dubliners a real sense of the City, the Port and the Bay.  For visitors, it will be a unique eye-opening stroll and vista through and alongside one of Europe’s busiest ports:  Diving Bell along Sir John Rogerson’s Quay over the Samuel Beckett Bridge, past the Scherzer Bridge and down the North Wall Quay campshire to Berth 18 - 1.2 km.   Liffey Tolka Project - Tree-lined pedestrian and cycle route between the River Liffey and the Tolka Estuary - 1.4 km with a 300-metre spur along Alexandra Road to The Pumphouse (to be completed by Q1 2021) and another 200 metres to The Flour Mill.   Tolka Estuary Greenway - Construction of Phase 1 (1.9 km) starts in December 2020 and will be completed by Spring 2022.  Phase 2 (1.3 km) will be delivered within the following five years.  The Pumphouse is a heritage zone being created as part of the Alexandra Basin Redevelopment Project.  The first phase of 1.6 acres will be completed in early 2021 and will include historical port equipment and buildings and a large open space for exhibitions and performances.  It will be expanded in a subsequent phase to incorporate the Victorian Graving Dock No. 1 which will be excavated and revealed. 
 The largest component of the distributed museum will be The Flour Mill.  This involves the redevelopment of the former Odlums Flour Mill on Alexandra Road based on a masterplan completed by Grafton Architects to provide a mix of port operational uses, a National Maritime Archive, two 300 seat performance venues, working and studio spaces for artists and exhibition spaces.   The Flour Mill will be developed in stages over the remaining twenty years of Masterplan 2040 alongside major port infrastructure projects.

Source: Dublin Port Company ©Afloat 2020. 

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