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Displaying items by tag: Port of Waterford

In the south-east Port of Waterford there has seen increased traffic through the port's main container terminal at Belview this year.

In the 10 months to 31 October, WaterfordLive writes, that the port handled 19,576 containers, an increase of 11% on the same period in 2019.

At 1.1m tonnes, bulk volumes were in line with the previous year. The port’s overall revenues for the period amounted to €5.5m which was down by approximately 10% reflecting decreased parking revenues in Waterford city centre arising from the Covid-19 restrictions.

As part of its work with Irish exporters and importers, the port’s management team are currently gauging market demand in a potential new service that would directly connect the southeast of Ireland with northern France.

Click here for more on this story. 

Published in Irish Ports

The Port of Waterford is highlighting a new report which identifies Belview Port on the River Suir as ideally places to serve Ireland’s growing offshore wind energy sector.

And it says strategic investment of €42 billion over the next 10 years could create 2,500 jobs in the sector.

Produced by the Carbon Trust for the Irish Wind Energy Association and part-funded by Green Tech Skillnet, ‘Harnessing Our Potential’ calls for strategic investment into one or more Irish ports to take advantage of the commercial opportunity of delivering 3.5GW of offshore wind by 2030. This is the level required by the State’s Climate Action Plan.

In a detailed readiness assessment of 16 Irish ports under physical characteristics and connectivity, Waterford was one of just two ports – along with Dublin, which is already regarded as at capacity – to meet all requirements.

Waterford also scored strongly for availability of additional land for development, proximity to existing offshore wind farm developments and access to the national road network.

The report’s authors say: “The [Port of Waterford’s] physical characteristics and connectivity mean it has good potential to serve the growth in offshore wind.

“t is currently one of the few ports in the Republic of Ireland capable of handling the weight of larger offshore wind turbines. Existing brownfield land at the port already in use for storing onshore wind turbines has the potential to accommodate staging with little investment or manufacturing with significant investment.

“Given the area available to the Port, it is well-placed to serve the construction stage of offshore wind with a certain level of investment. Redevelopment of other lands around Belview has also the potential for the Port to become an offshore wind cluster if the economic case can be proven.”

Commenting on the report, Port of Waterford chief executive Frank Ronan said: “There is clearly a huge commercial opportunity as Ireland moves more and more towards renewable energy to meet our international commitments to address climate change.

“This wide-ranging report puts clear data behind that opportunity and challenges all of us to seize the opportunity.

“From our own perspective at Waterford, we have been working for some time to position Belview as an ideal location for this type of activity over the coming decade and well beyond 2030. This is a central theme in both our Corporate Plan to 2023 and Masterplan to 2044.

“We look forward to further constructive engagement with multiple stakeholders to advance this ambition.”

The full report, which is available to read HERE, notes that Ireland currently lacks the ready infrastructure to build offshore wind farms, meaning that we would potentially lose “billions … unless strateguc investment decisions are made now”.

Published in Irish Ports

At the top of the agenda at New Ross Chamber is to attract a major company, writes Independent.ie

The executive group met in New Ross on Tuesday and during a lengthy meeting four priorities were outlined. Chamber President Sean Reidy said these include attracting a major company to the town within four years, local stakeholders taking back ownership of the port, getting a large new hotel for the town and attracting a major retailer to open a shop in the town centre.

Mr Reidy said stevedores at New Ross Port are seeking to have more of a say in its running, after it was announced earlier this year that Waterford Port was being lined up to take control of its operations. 'The future development of the port is a big priority as the port has a big say in New Ross and in the stakeholders in New Ross. There is the issue of it going to Waterford but we have views on that and we have stakeholders on our board who are currently in discussions with the county manager about running the port. I would hope a way could be found. On the one hand it can't be in the hands of private enterprise. We would be really emphasising our fear that will Waterford promote New Ross in the way we want it promoted. We feel New Ross stakeholders need to have a say in how it is run going forward and we are supporting the stakeholders in the town in those discussions.

Published in Irish Ports

A total of eight migrants discovered “hiding” on board a cargo ship at a port near Waterford city on Wednesday are likely to be sent back to France in the coming days.

The discovery, reports The Irish Times, was made by the crew of a “bulk cargo ship” that was travelling from St Nazaire in France to Belview Port. Three men fled the ship after being discovered, but were apprehended by gardaí a short time later.

A garda spokesman said the eight migrants, all believed to be adult males from Albania, were found to be in good health.

“Gardaí in Waterford were alerted to an incident today, Wednesday 4th December 2019, in Belview, Co Waterford where eight males were discovered by the crew in hiding on a bulk cargo ship travelling from France to Ireland,” the spokesman said in a statement.

“Garda immigration officers attached to Waterford Garda station are currently dealing with the males and they will be processed under the immigration law.”

The eight men are are believed to have stowed away on board the bulk carrier at St Nazaire before it sailed to Belview Port, where it arrived at around 9am on Wednesday. Port officials alerted gardaí to the presence of the stowaways.

For much more from the newspaper's coverage click here

Published in Irish Ports

Cargo handling capacity has been boosted by a Waterford based shipping agency by investing in a new mobile harbour crane with an innovative design that reduces its carbon footprint.

South East Port Services provide stevedoring, warehousing and ships agency services to shipping and client companies at the Port of Waterford in Belview.

The Liebherr LHM 280 was purpose-built for the port services company by Liebherr in Rostock, Germany, over a six-month period with Irish company closely involved throughout.

For more WaterfordLive reports. 

Published in Irish Ports

At the historic Port of New Ross shipping will soon be run by Belview Port in Waterford, in a controversial move planned by Wexford County Council.

As the New Ross Standard reports, the Director of Services for Economic Development Tony Larkin made the announcement at the first meeting of the new Wexford County Council term on Friday.

In an update to councillors ahead of the imminent transfer of the port from the state to Wexford County Council, Mr Larkin said: 'We are taking over the operation of the port. We have been in due diligence for two years.'

Mr Larkin said he was informed last week that the takeover process has been completed, save for three ministers signing the document which will formally allow the transfer.

'The process of having the ministers sign it has now commenced. Immediately upon transfer all assets and staff will transfer to us and we will have responsibility as the port authority. We are not in the shipping business. We are in discussions with the Port of Waterford at Belview about them acting as our agents managing the shipping for a fee.'

To read further comments from Mr Larkin and more click here. 

Published in Irish Ports

A shipping line based in the Netherlands, reports The Irish Times, will open up Waterford port to new international trade routes when it commences a weekly service on the Waterford to Rotterdam route which will act as a deep-sea feeder for Irish importers and exporters.

The Dutch operator BG Freight Line, in partnership with global shipping giant Maersk, is to commence the service on July 6th to support industry in the southeast. Effectively the move will allow goods travelling from Waterford to continue through Rotterdam to other ports such as Shanghai, whereas previously goods for destinations beyond Europe would typically have shipped from Dublin.

Part of the Peel Ports Group, BG Freight Line runs a fleet of 23 containerised vessels from its headquarters in the Netherlands. Maersk, meanwhile, is the largest container logistics organisation in the world, moving more than 12 million containers a year.

BG Freight Line chief executive Koert Luitwieler said the addition of Waterford to its network would strengthen the company’s Irish Sea network which encompassed routes from Dublin and Cork at present.

For more on this new additional Ireland-mainland Europe lo-lo service click here 

Published in Ports & Shipping

On the southern tip of County Kilkenny is located the Port of Waterford which is beginning a public consultation process seeking inputs from all stakeholders on a proposed master plan setting out how the port could develop over the 25-year period to 2044.

As the Kilkenny People writes, the port company's draft masterplan outlines various demand scenarios that will determine capacity requirements at the port. The intention is that the masterplan will provide a framework for development and position the port to respond to emerging trends and opportunities.

The first consultation sessions will be held on the 4th floor of the Marine Point office development in Belview, County Kilkenny at 11:00 and 14:30 on Wednesday, 26 June.

A further session will be held in the Passage East/Cheekpoint area of County Waterford on 18 July with the time and venue to be posted on the port’s website once confirmed.

Click here for more on the master plan. 

Published in Irish Ports

#irishports - Details of the Port of Waterford's financial results and operating performance for 2018 have been announced by the south-east port. 

The company’s accounts reports Waterford Live, show operating profits of €1.9m for the year to December 31, an increase of 12% on 2017.

Turnover in 2018 was €8m, up from €7.6m in the prior year. Shareholders funds stood at €32.7m at the year-end and the company is to pay a dividend of €330,000 to the Department of Transport, Tourism and Sport.

Bulk throughput at the port in Belview, Co Kilkenny over the year amounted to 1.7m tonnes, a 28% increase on 2017 which had itself seen a 27% increase over 2016. Containers handled grew by 3% while there was strong breakbulk activity including, for example, shipments of steel and timber. This traffic reflects increased economic activity, including in the construction sector.

For more on the annual results click here.

Published in Irish Ports
Tagged under

#irishports - Minister for Transport, Tourism & Sport, Shane Ross, has appointed two new directors to the board of the Port of Waterford Company following a competitive process managed by the Public Appointments Service.

Waterford Live writes, William Johnston and Derry O’Sullivan will join the existing board members Joe Dreelan; Louise Grubb; John Kehoe; Mary Mosse; Frank Ronan, CEO and Des Whelan, chairman.

Mr Johnston recently retired as a partner with Arthur Cox Solicitors where he specialised in banking law, capital markets and regulation. A board member at the National Maternity Hospital and the Housing Finance Agency, he is a former chair of the Law Society’s Business Law Committee and former co-chair of the Banking Law Division at the International Bar Association.

To read more on the appointments, click here. 

Published in Irish Ports
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About Dublin Port 

Dublin Port Company is currently investing about €277 million on its Alexandra Basin Redevelopment (ABR), which is due to be complete by 2021. The redevelopment will improve the port's capacity for large ships by deepening and lengthening 3km of its 7km of berths. The ABR is part of a €1bn capital programme up to 2028, which will also include initial work on the Dublin Port’s MP2 Project - a major capital development project proposal for works within the existing port lands in the northeastern part of the port.

Dublin Port has also recently secured planning approval for the development of the next phase of its inland port near Dublin Airport. The latest stage of the inland port will include a site with the capacity to store more than 2,000 shipping containers and infrastructures such as an ESB substation, an office building and gantry crane.

Dublin Port Company recently submitted a planning application for a €320 million project that aims to provide significant additional capacity at the facility within the port in order to cope with increases in trade up to 2040. The scheme will see a new roll-on/roll-off jetty built to handle ferries of up to 240 metres in length, as well as the redevelopment of an oil berth into a deep-water container berth.

Dublin Port FAQ

Dublin was little more than a monastic settlement until the Norse invasion in the 8th and 9th centuries when they selected the Liffey Estuary as their point of entry to the country as it provided relatively easy access to the central plains of Ireland. Trading with England and Europe followed which required port facilities, so the development of Dublin Port is inextricably linked to the development of Dublin City, so it is fair to say the origins of the Port go back over one thousand years. As a result, the modern organisation Dublin Port has a long and remarkable history, dating back over 300 years from 1707.

The original Port of Dublin was situated upriver, a few miles from its current location near the modern Civic Offices at Wood Quay and close to Christchurch Cathedral. The Port remained close to that area until the new Custom House opened in the 1790s. In medieval times Dublin shipped cattle hides to Britain and the continent, and the returning ships carried wine, pottery and other goods.

510 acres. The modern Dublin Port is located either side of the River Liffey, out to its mouth. On the north side of the river, the central part (205 hectares or 510 acres) of the Port lies at the end of East Wall and North Wall, from Alexandra Quay.

Dublin Port Company is a State-owned commercial company responsible for operating and developing Dublin Port.

Dublin Port Company is a self-financing, and profitable private limited company wholly-owned by the State, whose business is to manage Dublin Port, Ireland's premier Port. Established as a corporate entity in 1997, Dublin Port Company is responsible for the management, control, operation and development of the Port.

Captain William Bligh (of Mutiny of the Bounty fame) was a visitor to Dublin in 1800, and his visit to the capital had a lasting effect on the Port. Bligh's study of the currents in Dublin Bay provided the basis for the construction of the North Wall. This undertaking led to the growth of Bull Island to its present size.

Yes. Dublin Port is the largest freight and passenger port in Ireland. It handles almost 50% of all trade in the Republic of Ireland.

All cargo handling activities being carried out by private sector companies operating in intensely competitive markets within the Port. Dublin Port Company provides world-class facilities, services, accommodation and lands in the harbour for ships, goods and passengers.

Eamonn O'Reilly is the Dublin Port Chief Executive.

Capt. Michael McKenna is the Dublin Port Harbour Master

In 2019, 1,949,229 people came through the Port.

In 2019, there were 158 cruise liner visits.

In 2019, 9.4 million gross tonnes of exports were handled by Dublin Port.

In 2019, there were 7,898 ship arrivals.

In 2019, there was a gross tonnage of 38.1 million.

In 2019, there were 559,506 tourist vehicles.

There were 98,897 lorries in 2019

Boats can navigate the River Liffey into Dublin by using the navigational guidelines. Find the guidelines on this page here.

VHF channel 12. Commercial vessels using Dublin Port or Dun Laoghaire Port typically have a qualified pilot or certified master with proven local knowledge on board. They "listen out" on VHF channel 12 when in Dublin Port's jurisdiction.

A Dublin Bay webcam showing the south of the Bay at Dun Laoghaire and a distant view of Dublin Port Shipping is here
Dublin Port is creating a distributed museum on its lands in Dublin City.
 A Liffey Tolka Project cycle and pedestrian way is the key to link the elements of this distributed museum together.  The distributed museum starts at the Diving Bell and, over the course of 6.3km, will give Dubliners a real sense of the City, the Port and the Bay.  For visitors, it will be a unique eye-opening stroll and vista through and alongside one of Europe’s busiest ports:  Diving Bell along Sir John Rogerson’s Quay over the Samuel Beckett Bridge, past the Scherzer Bridge and down the North Wall Quay campshire to Berth 18 - 1.2 km.   Liffey Tolka Project - Tree-lined pedestrian and cycle route between the River Liffey and the Tolka Estuary - 1.4 km with a 300-metre spur along Alexandra Road to The Pumphouse (to be completed by Q1 2021) and another 200 metres to The Flour Mill.   Tolka Estuary Greenway - Construction of Phase 1 (1.9 km) starts in December 2020 and will be completed by Spring 2022.  Phase 2 (1.3 km) will be delivered within the following five years.  The Pumphouse is a heritage zone being created as part of the Alexandra Basin Redevelopment Project.  The first phase of 1.6 acres will be completed in early 2021 and will include historical port equipment and buildings and a large open space for exhibitions and performances.  It will be expanded in a subsequent phase to incorporate the Victorian Graving Dock No. 1 which will be excavated and revealed. 
 The largest component of the distributed museum will be The Flour Mill.  This involves the redevelopment of the former Odlums Flour Mill on Alexandra Road based on a masterplan completed by Grafton Architects to provide a mix of port operational uses, a National Maritime Archive, two 300 seat performance venues, working and studio spaces for artists and exhibition spaces.   The Flour Mill will be developed in stages over the remaining twenty years of Masterplan 2040 alongside major port infrastructure projects.

Source: Dublin Port Company ©Afloat 2020. 

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