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Displaying items by tag: Queen Elizabeth

#CruiseLiners - Telegraph Travel reports that a passenger on the Queen Elizabeth has died after an incident while boarding the ocean liner as it was anchored off Cambodia.

The female passenger, who has not been named, was boarding the Cunard cruise ship from a tender off Sihanoukville in Cambodia's south-west when she ended up in the water.

Despite the tender's crew quick efforts to rescue her from the water, she later died in the ship's medical centre.

The newest addition to Cunard's cruise liner fleet, and the second largest after the Queen Mary 2, was last seen in these waters when she berthed off Dun Laoghaire in August 2013.

The Telegraph has much more on the story HERE.

Published in Cruise Liners

#QueenElizabeth – Queen Elizabeth's maiden visit off Dun Laoghaire Harbour today presented a wonderful sight, not to mention her impressive and sumptuous art-deco style interiors which pay homage to the legendary 1930's Cunard Ocean Liner RMS Queen Elizabeth, writes Jehan Ashmore.

The 'Vista' class 90,901 tonnes cruiseship, is the newest of the Cunard Line fleet and she was commissioned in 2010 and named by Queen Elizabeth II in Southampton. A portrait of the monarch by Isobel Peachey hangs in the splendid foyer of the Grand Lobby.

Captain C. Wells has command of the vessel with 2,040 guests which is close to her capacity of 2,100 passengers and almost 1,000 crew members. On the cruise of British and Irish ports which set off from Southampton at the end of July, the majority of the guests are from the UK and United States in addition to around 150 Germans who boarded in Hamburg.

Her guests can expect high standards with the history and pedigree of Cunard Line and among the features on Queen Elizabeth are the Grand Lobby with its magnificent mural of her 1930's predecessor. There are  eight restaurants, two theatres, three swimming pools and a games deck, together with a large spa and fitness centre, shopping arcade, libraries, bars, cafés, and a casino.

The library with 7,000 books is the second largest floating library in the world after Queen Mary 2 and there's also an art gallery with paintings by Irish artist Philip Gray. In addition to those who fancy a cigar one can decline to the intimate wood-panelled surroundings of Churchill's Lounge sited high above the seas.

QUEEN ELIZABETH 2

The Queen's Room Photo: Jehan Ashmore

QUEEN ELIZABETH 3

The Grand Lobby Photo: Jehan Ashmore

In essence the cruiseship exudes luxury that respects the golden day era of liners whilst also combining the many wonderful modern day comforts to which cruise-goers also demand.

Queen Elizabeth is due to weigh anchor 21.00hrs this evening and after a day spent at sea her next port of call is St. Peter Port, Guernsey before her return to Southampton

Published in Cruise Liners

#CunarderCALL – Cunard Line's newest cruiseship, the 90,901 tonnes Queen Elizabeth is to make her maiden call off Dun Laoghaire Harbour tomorrow. She is the second largest ship built for the company after Queen Mary 2 which called earlier this summer, writes Jehan Ashmore.

Queen Elizabeth has 12 passenger decks accommodating 2,068 guests and the 294m vessel first paid a visit to Dublin Bay with a call to Dublin Port in 2011, the same year of her namesake's historic state visit by Queen Elizabeth. A subsequent return call by the cruiseship as previously reported was made this time last year.

Captain C. Wells has command of the 2010 built ship which is currently docked alongside Liverpool Cruise Terminal and is due to arrive in Dublin Bay around 07.30hrs tomorrow morning.

Her visit to Dun Laoghaire is part of a British Isles 12-Day Cruise which set off from Hamburg late last month and terminates in Southampton following an en route call to St. Peter Port, Guernsey.

Cunard Line's third ship, Queen Victoria is a sister and they both are of the same design to P&O Cruises Arcadia which called offshore to Dun Laoghaire almost a month ago. There are external differences particularly along the uppermost decks.

Both companies are subsidiaries of the world's largest cruise shipping group, Carnival Corporation which too operates Holland America Line (HAL) whose medium-sized cruiseship, Eurodam recently visted Dublin Port and as previously reported off Dunmore East.

Eurodam also shares this same Italian built cruiseship design, from the Fincantieri shipyard in Marghera, Venice, albeit the most notable difference is the twin funnel stacks.

Additonal information from Dun Laoghaire Harbour Company:

The prestigious Queen Elizabeth cruise liner will dock in Dún Laoghaire Harbour tomorrow, Wednesday, 7th August 2013, from 7am to 6pm.

The ship belongs to the world-famous Cunard Line and is decorated in an art deco style reminiscent of 1930s ocean liners. Dún Laoghaire will be the fifth port of call for the Queen Elizabeth since it set sail from Southampton a week ago on a 10-day cruise of Britain and Ireland.

Speaking ahead of the arrival, CEO of Dún Laoghaire Harbour Company, Gerry Dunne, said: "The iconic Queen Mary 2 visited Dún Laoghaire in May and today we are delighted to welcome her sister ship, the Queen Elizabeth. It is a tremendous boost for the harbour to have a visit from a ship of her calibre."

 

Published in Cruise Liners

#PORTS & SHIPPING REVIEW - Over the last fortnight Jehan Ashmore has reported from the Shipping scene which saw 'signature' cruiseship Mein Schiff 2 with her striking visual livery-scheme calling to Irish ports.

The Naval Service has been made detentions of Irish registered fishing vessels this week and also last month off the Clare and Cork coastlines, bringing to date 12 such incidents so far this year.

The world's smallest 5-star luxury cruiseship Hebridean Princess (1964/2,112grt) which was chartered twice in recent years for the Royal Family, called to Dublin Port recently and is currently on a return cruise from Cork with anchorage calls in Kerry waters.

Dublin Based d'Amico have ordered a pair of 40,000dwt eco-product/chemical tanker vessels, believed to cost US$ 30.65 million, from a South Korean shipyard and delivered early in 2014.

Since her launch in 2010, Cunard Line's newest cruiseship Queen Elizabeth (90,901 tonnes) made her second only visit to Dublin Port, where she called last year and also to Cork, which too was revisited by the 2068 passenger vessel.

The on-going saga to retain the veteran WWI Battle of Jutland survivor HMS Caroline in Belfast, her homeport since 1924 was given a reprieve. The National Museum of the Royal Navy (NMRN) in Portsmouth secured a four-week extension to the original deadline (1 Aug) which was set for scrapping of the historic warship.

The near fifty year-old Hebble Sand (1963/757grt), a grab-hopper dredger which has remained in Dublin Port for more than one year departed Dublin Port and reached Campbeltown last week for new Northern Irish owners Abco Marine.

Port of Cork Company was awarded 'Large Company of the Year for the 2nd Quarter 2012' by the Cork Business Association. This season the port is to welcome 60 cruiseships between April and November, bringing more than 100,000 passengers and crew to the region.

While in Dublin Port, Finnish based Kristina Cruises 400 passenger Kristina Katarena made her inaugural Irish call, the 1982 built vessel was launched from New Szczecin Shipyard. The name of the Polish city may sound familiar as they are the presenting sponsor of Tall Ships Races which are coming to the capital later this month.

Published in Ports & Shipping

#CUNARDER REVISIT – Since her launch in 2010, Cunard Line's newest cruiseship the 90,901 tonnes Queen Elizabeth has only called to Dublin Port once and that was last year. She was then on her maiden 'Irish' port of call and the 2068 passenger vessel is to return on Saturday, writes Jehan Ashmore.

Joining her on the schedule of visiting cruiseships this August, which not surprisingly is the busiest period of the high-season, will be Holland America Line's Maasdam. She is to arrive only an hour later that morning.

The month is scheduled to see 28 cruise callers (list) in total, the first caller having already arrived yesterday with the Hebridean Princess staying overnight in the port.

Following the Cunarder's call she will her head overnight bound for Cobh Cruise Terminal, where the Italian built vessel also made an inaugural port of call (list) in 2011.

Published in Cruise Liners

#CRUISELINERS- She may be one of the smallest cruiseships operating, however Hebridean Princess (1964/2,112grt) which is to call to Dublin Port this evening, is big in terms of her status, writes Jehan Ashmore.

A plaque was unveiled on board in May to recognise that the ship has been granted a Royal Warrant by Queen Elizabeth II, as the Royal Family chartered the 5-star luxury vessel in Scottish waters in 2006 and 2010.

The warrant for the provision of cruise holidays came into effect at the start of this year and her owners Hebridean Island Cruises will be the only travel brand honoured in such a way.

The interiors are modelled on those of a large country mansion, where each of 30 cabin suites are individually decorated in opulent style. This is a far cry to her origins as a humble ferry. In that guise she ran as Columba, serving ferry operator Caledonian MacBrayne.

This evening she is set to pass through the East-Link toll-lift bridge, due to her smaller dimensions compared to larger cruiseships which have to dock elsewhere in the port. For example today also see 30,000 tonnes sisters Nautica and Azamara Journey dock in Ocean Pier at berths 33 and 37 respectively.

Hebridean Princess is to tie-up on Sir John Rogerson's Quay at berth 8 where she moored last year. In addition this berth was where another equally luxurious vessel the superyacht M.Y. Majestic, which as previously reported called to last weekend. The four-deck Caymen Islands registered vessel is currently on a visit to Dun Laoghaire Harbour.

Published in Cruise Liners

#CRUISE LINERS – The Port of Cork is to welcome 60 cruise vessels this season, an increase on 2011 levels when 53 calls were made, bringing over 100,000 passengers and crew to the region, writes Jehan Ashmore.

According to UK Consultants GP Wild, the average in-transit spend per passenger, while visiting an Irish port is between €73- €100 which provides a significant contribution towards the local tourism economy.

Last year Cork won 1st place for 'Best Destination Experience (Organised)' in the world and 2nd place for 'Best Port Welcome' in the Dream World Cruise Destinations Awards.

Fred Olsen Cruise Lines Balmoral is the first caller for 2012 when she is to dock at Cobh in April. Larger cruise ships to visit during the season include Celebrity Eclipse, Emerald Princess, Independence of the Seas, Costa Deliziosa and Caribbean Princess.

In addition Cunard Line's Queen Elizabeth is to return to Cobh in August. Her inaugural Irish visit was in September last year, when the 90,000 tonnes vessel called firstly to Dublin followed by Cobh, to read more click HERE.

For a list of the cruise schedule, click HERE, noting several calls are to Ringaskiddy and North Custom House Quay in Cork City.

Published in Cruise Liners

#CRUISE LINERS- Around 85 cruiseships are scheduled to call to Dublin Port in 2012, which compares closely to the same number of calls for this year's season, writes Jehan Ashmore.

First to start the season will be Grand Princess, which has the accolade of being the inaugural cruiseship to enter the port with a tonnage surpassing the 100,000 gross tonnes. The milestone was marked by the Princess Cruises call in 2004.

As usual with that number of cruise-callers, the variety of vessels will range from the small to the very large. A prime example is the diminutive expedition cruiseship Quest (1,180 tonnes) and at just under 50-metres long has just over the same number in passenger capacity.

In complete contrast to the ice-strenghtened Quest is the giant Caribbean Princess, a larger sister of Grand Princess, can accommodate over 3,000 passengers and she is make several calls.

Noble Caledonia which has been operating Quest (PHOTO) on successful seasons in Scotland, is to embark on itineraries next season to Ireland, England and Wales for the first time. Her half-sister Ocean Nova has called to Dublin on previous occasions.

For only the second time, Queen Elizabeth is due return to the capital (for report click HERE) in late Summer and in the same week, Hebridean Princess is also scheduled to call. The later vessel in recent years was chartered to Queen Elizabeth II, for a cruise off the Scottish Isles. To read more on the small ship's visit to the port earlier this year click HERE.

Published in Cruise Liners
With today's historic Irish rugby victory over Australia, fans of the green jersey, who happen to be on a cruise-ship with Cunard Line or P&O Cruises, will be able to continue watching games of the Rugby World Cup, writes Jehan Ashmore.
One of the ten participating cruise ships, Cunard Line's Queen Elizabeth (90,901 gross tonnes) owned by Carnival Corporation, made her maiden 'Irish' call to Dublin Port and Cobh last week, is showing live or recorded games within 24 hours from the original kick-off. This will enable games to be shown at convenient times for the participating cruise ships in their various locations.

A total of 24 matches are being shown, starting from the opening game and will include all four Home Nations' matches, quarter-finals, semi -finals, bronze final and then the final on 23rd October. Of course there will be other fans on board from Wales, Scotland, England and elsewhere watching the fixtures throughout the cruise-ships various sporting bars, pubs and other venues.

Carnival Corporation's UK entertainment services general manager, Paul Wright, said: "The Rugby World Cup is of great interest to many of our passengers and we're pleased that nobody will miss out by being on holiday with us throughout this time. At any one time we could have more than 19,000 passengers collectively on board and rooting for one of the Four Nations to bring home the trophy".

He added: "Most people have a sport that they follow and some times, like on a cruise ship, you won't have access to your favourite sport, which means a lot to fans. On our last cruise on Independence of the Seas, we had popular sports shown in state rooms and certain bars around the ship, of course football was the most common sport shown".

Incidentally Independence of the Seas has also called to Cobh since her Irish debut in 2007 and at 154,407 tonnes is the largest ever cruise-caller to Cork Harbour. She surpasses Cunard Line's flagship Queen Mary 2 of 148,528 tonnes which too berthed at Cobh last Wednesday, four days after Queen Elizabeth's inaugural visit.

Published in Cruise Liners
Cunard Line's flagship Queen Mary 2 docked at Cobh today, the 148,528 tonnes giant liner follows Queen Elizabeth which made her maiden call to Cork Harbour last Saturday, writes Jehan Ashmore.
Queen Mary 2 cost €549m and she is the only true 'liner' operating in the world today as she on occasions provides scheduled trans-Atlantic sailings between Southampton and New York. Some of these sailings include calling to Hamburg. In addition to this role she offers worldwide cruising. Her predecessor Queen Elizabeth 2 (QE2) was sold several years to Dubai interests.

The current liner (QM2) can carry 2,620 passengers and a crew of over 1,200 on a vessel is the longest, tallest and widest of any passenger liner built. The luxury liner has private balconies for nearly 80 per cent of cabins and has an art collection worth £3.5m. To complement these works of art there is the first 'floating planetarium', the largest library at sea, boasting 8,000 hardbacks and also the largest ballroom to grace a ship on the oceans.

Queen Mary 2 was short-listed to be built in Belfast at the Harland & Wolff shipyard, but the contract went to Chantiers d'Atlantique, St. Nazaire on the west coast of France.

Her first visit to Irish waters occurred when she anchored off Dunmore East in 2005, the liner had arrived overnight on a passage from her homeport of Southampton and was on a nine-day cruise of British, Irish and Baltic state ports.

Today's Cobh visit of the 345m long Queen Mary 2 coincided with Ocean Countess, a former 'Cunarder', which is also in the port. The 163m vessel was built in 1976 and launched as their Cunard Countess. She weighs 17,593grt and has a 800 passenger capacity. Last year she joined Cruise & Maritime Voyages (CMV) fleet under charter from Majestic International Cruises Group.

Also at work in Cork Harbour was the excursion vessel Spirit of the Isles which apart from operating River Lee sight-seeing cruises between Cork city-centre and Cobh at the weekends, is running a charter cruise this afternoon to Spike Island. For information about sightseeing trips and chartering click HERE.

Published in Cruise Liners
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About Dublin Port 

Dublin Port is Ireland’s largest and busiest port with approximately 17,000 vessel movements per year. As well as being the country’s largest port, Dublin Port has the highest rate of growth and, in the seven years to 2019, total cargo volumes grew by 36.1%.

The vision of Dublin Port Company is to have the required capacity to service the needs of its customers and the wider economy safely, efficiently and sustainably. Dublin Port will integrate with the City by enhancing the natural and built environments. The Port is being developed in line with Masterplan 2040.

Dublin Port Company is currently investing about €277 million on its Alexandra Basin Redevelopment (ABR), which is due to be complete by 2021. The redevelopment will improve the port's capacity for large ships by deepening and lengthening 3km of its 7km of berths. The ABR is part of a €1bn capital programme up to 2028, which will also include initial work on the Dublin Port’s MP2 Project - a major capital development project proposal for works within the existing port lands in the northeastern part of the port.

Dublin Port has also recently secured planning approval for the development of the next phase of its inland port near Dublin Airport. The latest stage of the inland port will include a site with the capacity to store more than 2,000 shipping containers and infrastructures such as an ESB substation, an office building and gantry crane.

Dublin Port Company recently submitted a planning application for a €320 million project that aims to provide significant additional capacity at the facility within the port in order to cope with increases in trade up to 2040. The scheme will see a new roll-on/roll-off jetty built to handle ferries of up to 240 metres in length, as well as the redevelopment of an oil berth into a deep-water container berth.

Dublin Port FAQ

Dublin was little more than a monastic settlement until the Norse invasion in the 8th and 9th centuries when they selected the Liffey Estuary as their point of entry to the country as it provided relatively easy access to the central plains of Ireland. Trading with England and Europe followed which required port facilities, so the development of Dublin Port is inextricably linked to the development of Dublin City, so it is fair to say the origins of the Port go back over one thousand years. As a result, the modern organisation Dublin Port has a long and remarkable history, dating back over 300 years from 1707.

The original Port of Dublin was situated upriver, a few miles from its current location near the modern Civic Offices at Wood Quay and close to Christchurch Cathedral. The Port remained close to that area until the new Custom House opened in the 1790s. In medieval times Dublin shipped cattle hides to Britain and the continent, and the returning ships carried wine, pottery and other goods.

510 acres. The modern Dublin Port is located either side of the River Liffey, out to its mouth. On the north side of the river, the central part (205 hectares or 510 acres) of the Port lies at the end of East Wall and North Wall, from Alexandra Quay.

Dublin Port Company is a State-owned commercial company responsible for operating and developing Dublin Port.

Dublin Port Company is a self-financing, and profitable private limited company wholly-owned by the State, whose business is to manage Dublin Port, Ireland's premier Port. Established as a corporate entity in 1997, Dublin Port Company is responsible for the management, control, operation and development of the Port.

Captain William Bligh (of Mutiny of the Bounty fame) was a visitor to Dublin in 1800, and his visit to the capital had a lasting effect on the Port. Bligh's study of the currents in Dublin Bay provided the basis for the construction of the North Wall. This undertaking led to the growth of Bull Island to its present size.

Yes. Dublin Port is the largest freight and passenger port in Ireland. It handles almost 50% of all trade in the Republic of Ireland.

All cargo handling activities being carried out by private sector companies operating in intensely competitive markets within the Port. Dublin Port Company provides world-class facilities, services, accommodation and lands in the harbour for ships, goods and passengers.

Eamonn O'Reilly is the Dublin Port Chief Executive.

Capt. Michael McKenna is the Dublin Port Harbour Master

In 2019, 1,949,229 people came through the Port.

In 2019, there were 158 cruise liner visits.

In 2019, 9.4 million gross tonnes of exports were handled by Dublin Port.

In 2019, there were 7,898 ship arrivals.

In 2019, there was a gross tonnage of 38.1 million.

In 2019, there were 559,506 tourist vehicles.

There were 98,897 lorries in 2019

Boats can navigate the River Liffey into Dublin by using the navigational guidelines. Find the guidelines on this page here.

VHF channel 12. Commercial vessels using Dublin Port or Dun Laoghaire Port typically have a qualified pilot or certified master with proven local knowledge on board. They "listen out" on VHF channel 12 when in Dublin Port's jurisdiction.

A Dublin Bay webcam showing the south of the Bay at Dun Laoghaire and a distant view of Dublin Port Shipping is here
Dublin Port is creating a distributed museum on its lands in Dublin City.
 A Liffey Tolka Project cycle and pedestrian way is the key to link the elements of this distributed museum together.  The distributed museum starts at the Diving Bell and, over the course of 6.3km, will give Dubliners a real sense of the City, the Port and the Bay.  For visitors, it will be a unique eye-opening stroll and vista through and alongside one of Europe’s busiest ports:  Diving Bell along Sir John Rogerson’s Quay over the Samuel Beckett Bridge, past the Scherzer Bridge and down the North Wall Quay campshire to Berth 18 - 1.2 km.   Liffey Tolka Project - Tree-lined pedestrian and cycle route between the River Liffey and the Tolka Estuary - 1.4 km with a 300-metre spur along Alexandra Road to The Pumphouse (to be completed by Q1 2021) and another 200 metres to The Flour Mill.   Tolka Estuary Greenway - Construction of Phase 1 (1.9 km) starts in December 2020 and will be completed by Spring 2022.  Phase 2 (1.3 km) will be delivered within the following five years.  The Pumphouse is a heritage zone being created as part of the Alexandra Basin Redevelopment Project.  The first phase of 1.6 acres will be completed in early 2021 and will include historical port equipment and buildings and a large open space for exhibitions and performances.  It will be expanded in a subsequent phase to incorporate the Victorian Graving Dock No. 1 which will be excavated and revealed. 
 The largest component of the distributed museum will be The Flour Mill.  This involves the redevelopment of the former Odlums Flour Mill on Alexandra Road based on a masterplan completed by Grafton Architects to provide a mix of port operational uses, a National Maritime Archive, two 300 seat performance venues, working and studio spaces for artists and exhibition spaces.   The Flour Mill will be developed in stages over the remaining twenty years of Masterplan 2040 alongside major port infrastructure projects.

Source: Dublin Port Company ©Afloat 2020. 

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