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Displaying items by tag: RStGYC

Places are still available for the latest powerboat training course at the Royal St George Yacht Club later this month.

The two-day course, on Saturday 29 February and Sunday 1 March from 8.45am to 5pm, provides the ideal way to get afloat for the first time, or to build on skills you already have.

The Irish Sailing syllabus Powerboat II course (National Powerboat Certificate) will formally teach you the fundamentals in the safe operation of a powerboat, its preparation and allied aspects, while helping you to build your confidence on the water and get the most from your RIB or powerboat in a safe and comfortable manner.

This weekend course (which will also run in May) is priced at €260 which includes all course materials, instruction and certifications. Book online via the RSGYC website HERE.

Published in Power

The Royal St George Yacht Club will host a table quiz on Friday 6 March to raise funds for Rehab Care Dun Laoghaire.

Join quizmaster Sarah Mullen-Rackow as she challenges with questions on an evening of fun and prizes that’s not to be missed.

Tables are €50 and the quizzing begins at 8pm in the dining room, with platters of sandwiches served at half time. Places are limited so be sure to book early to avoid disappointment.

For any queries contact Danielle Gagg at reception and marketing on 01 280 1811.

Published in RStGYC
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A special workshop that aims to demystify the area of sailing results for events will take place at the Royal St George Yacht Club on Saturday 29 February.

The workshop day will also provide attendees with the skills and confidence to expertly run results for a sailing race or event of their own.

Attendees should bring their own laptop (which runs Windows) to the workshop, which starts at 10 am on the day in the Club Room and continues to the afternoon with a break for lunch.

This workshop is open to all RSGYC members, with spaces limited to 15 attendees. The fee is just €5 and online registration is required.

Any questions should be directed to Karin in the Sailing Office on 01 280 1811.

Published in RStGYC
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Barry Hayes from UK Sailmakers Ireland begins a new series of talks with Top Tips For Sailors next Thursday 16 January at Howth Yacht Club from 7.30pm.

Members and guests alike are welcome to attend the two-part session which will cover both optimisation for racing or cruising vessels, and learning how to service your deck hardware — overalls recommended.

Barry will also visit the Royal St George on Thursday 30 January (time TBC) and Kinsale Yacht Club on Thursday 13 February at 7.30pm.

UK Sailmakers Flyer

Published in Howth YC

The CH Marine sponsored 'Final Fling' Dinghy Regatta takes place for the 3rd consecutive year, this Sept 28th in Dun Laoghaire writes Gavan Murphy, Dublin Bay Laser Class Captain

This year, the regatta will offer a very innovative format in that there will be two fleets, a Regatta Fleet and a Main Fleet.

The Regatta Fleet, facilitated by the Royal St George Yacht Club, is designed to accommodate less confident Laser (only) sailors. This fleet with race 5 short races inside the Harbour, with plenty of RIB support and on the water coaching. It will comprise of sailors that have perhaps done some of the Laser 'Kindergarten' workshops that have been running throughout the season in locations including Dun Laoghaire, Malahide & Wexford. Other participants in this group may include parents whose child has a Laser but their own sailing has lapsed and they're a little rusty. Regatta Fleet sailors are expected to be able to sail around a simple triangular course. There will be a briefing and debriefing session in the Royal St George to help the learning experience and a 15-minute workshop looking at rigging and sail control lines, all given by Sean Craig, local Laser sailor and Regatta Fleet Race Officer for the day.

The Main Fleet will be facilitated by the DBSC and will comprise of PY's (IDRA, Fireball, Vago etc.), Laser Standards, Laser Radials and Laser 4.7's who will complete 4 quick-fire races for the coveted 'Final Fling' prizes!

Prizegiving for both fleets will take place in the Royal St George from 6 pm. This will be followed by the 'now infamous' end of season Laser fleet dinner and social in the George that evening.

Follow this link to enter both the Regatta & Main Fleet here

Published in CH Marine Chandlery
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In any sailing event, the helmsman must concentrate on his sails, and on the motion of the vessel through the water. Most crews really don’t have much to do except when the boat arrives at the corners on the course writes Vincent Delany

At the International 12-foot Dinghy Championship at the Royal St George Yacht Club, Dun Laoghaire on 15th September, young Henry Shackleton knowing that he had nothing to do until he heard the words ‘Ready about’ from his dad, David, took the opportunity of a quick nap after a hard night on the town. Despite, Henry napping, he finished in second place in the competition for the historic Altair Cup originally won by Billy Mooney.

We look forward to Henry competing as a helmsman in the Irish 12 Foot Dinghy Championship in ten year’s time in his grandfather’s 12-foot dinghy which is due for restoration in the near future.

Aus 1 and othersAus 1 and others

Published in RStGYC
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The Royal St George Yacht Club had reason to celebrate when members of the U25 squad took Class 1 and won the overall team prize in the Irish Sailing Pathfinder Women at the Helm Regatta this past weekend.

With Niamh Henry at the helm, Alanna Lyttle on main trim, Ellen Murray on pit, Roberta Bell King on bow and Gillian Ballesty on kite trim, the Class 1 team won both of their Saturday races on Dublin Bay in the event hosted by the neighbouring National Yacht Club.

“It was tough going but we worked well as a team and had some fun with the spinnaker in the big wind,” the crew said later.

The RSGYC also won the overall team prize with Helen O’Beirne in the Laser Radial and Grace O’Beirne in the 420.

Sligo Yacht Club’s sailors were the big winners on the day, as previously reported on Afloat.ie.

Published in RStGYC

The Royal St George Yacht Club has revealed the nominees for its Annual Sailing Awards, otherwise known as the RStGYC Oscars.

Chris Power Smith’s J/122 Aurelia is guaranteed a share in the Commodore’s Cup for best offshore performance as the nominees comprise Team Joshua Trio (Aurelia, Platinum Blonde and Windjammer) and his own campaign.

Keelboats and crew in the running for the Enriquetta Cup this year are Brendan and Sarah Foley and their Impala Running Wild (pictured top), Michael O’Connor’s SB20 Sin Bin, and Richard and Philip Lovegrove with their Sigma 33 Rupert.

Aurelia 4142Chris Power Smith’s J/122 Aurelia

Significant dinghy performance is rewarded with the Vice-Commodore’s Cup, whose nominees include promising Optimist talent Charlie Cullen and Laser sailors Jack Fahy, Tom Higgins and Shirley Gilmore.

Gilmore is also nominated for the Causeway Trophy for sportsmanship alongside Harriet Walker, Ross O’Leary and Emily Riordan.

Ross oleary 2296 2Ross O'Leary

Optimist sailor Riordan shows up again in the shortlist for the Youth Award, with Laser 4.7/Waszp sailor Alana Coakley, 420 pair Grace O’Beirne and Kathy Kelly, RS Feva duo Elysia O’Leary and Lily Dwyer, and former Oppy and now Laser competitor Moss Simington.

Ross O’Leary, meanwhile, is also in the running for the Waterfront Award for significant contribution to the sport of sailing.

His excellent work as Laser class captain is recognised along with Laser Masters Worlds committee chair David Kelly, rowing fitness instructor John Sheehy, and Irish Sailing Pathway Nationals chair Ian Simington.

And rounding out the awards, Paul Conway’s Cervantes and Birmayne (Justin McKenna, Paul Dobbyn and Crew) are up for the O’Hanlon Cup for best cruise of 2018.

The RStGYC Oscars will be awarded on Friday night 6 April at a black tie gala dinner in the clubhouse from 6.30pm. Members can book their places HERE.

Published in RStGYC
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‘Flying Irishman’ Tom Dolan will join Royal St George Yacht Club members for brunch at the Dun Laoghaire waterfront clubhouse from noon this Saturday 19 January.

Tom was nominated for Irish Sailor of the Year 2017 and again in 2018, and his adventures feature prominently in the 2019 Afloat Irish Sailing Annual.

The France-based Irish sailing professional has been nicknamed ‘l’irlandais volant — or ‘the Flying Irishman’ — for his accomplishments in the challenging solo offshore Figaro race.

Tom will tell RStGYC members about his intense 2018 season which culminated in the Solitaire du Figaro, a story illustrated with slides and videos that he’s already brought around Ireland.

He will also elaborate on his plans for this year’s race with his new boat, the revolutionary foiling Beneteau Figaro 3, which he previously revealed in a talk at Poolbeg Yacht & Boat Cub earlier this month.

The offshore sailor’s visit comes after a welcome talk by Annalise Murphy last week, and should be of interest to sailors young and old alike.

The talk starts at noon sharp, with the usual George Brunch available from 11am to 2.30pm. There is no extra cost for the talk. To book call Laura in Reception at 01 280 1811.

Published in Solo Sailing
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#RowFit - The Royal St George Yacht Club has teamed up with former Olympic rower and world record holder Niall O’Toole to offer members and friends a unique fitness experience for the New Year.

Participants in the Crew Class Indoors programme will get ‘RowFit’ as they work 85% of their muscles with every stroke of the rowing machine.

The programme is described as “a fantastic unparalleled exercise to get stronger, leaner, and work your core and learn to row in a fun team environment.”

Classes began this week, with two sessions on Tuesday and Thursday evenings. For more details and how to book a session see the RStGYC website HERE.

Published in Rowing
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About Dublin Port 

Dublin Port is Ireland’s largest and busiest port with approximately 17,000 vessel movements per year. As well as being the country’s largest port, Dublin Port has the highest rate of growth and, in the seven years to 2019, total cargo volumes grew by 36.1%.

The vision of Dublin Port Company is to have the required capacity to service the needs of its customers and the wider economy safely, efficiently and sustainably. Dublin Port will integrate with the City by enhancing the natural and built environments. The Port is being developed in line with Masterplan 2040.

Dublin Port Company is currently investing about €277 million on its Alexandra Basin Redevelopment (ABR), which is due to be complete by 2021. The redevelopment will improve the port's capacity for large ships by deepening and lengthening 3km of its 7km of berths. The ABR is part of a €1bn capital programme up to 2028, which will also include initial work on the Dublin Port’s MP2 Project - a major capital development project proposal for works within the existing port lands in the northeastern part of the port.

Dublin Port has also recently secured planning approval for the development of the next phase of its inland port near Dublin Airport. The latest stage of the inland port will include a site with the capacity to store more than 2,000 shipping containers and infrastructures such as an ESB substation, an office building and gantry crane.

Dublin Port Company recently submitted a planning application for a €320 million project that aims to provide significant additional capacity at the facility within the port in order to cope with increases in trade up to 2040. The scheme will see a new roll-on/roll-off jetty built to handle ferries of up to 240 metres in length, as well as the redevelopment of an oil berth into a deep-water container berth.

Dublin Port FAQ

Dublin was little more than a monastic settlement until the Norse invasion in the 8th and 9th centuries when they selected the Liffey Estuary as their point of entry to the country as it provided relatively easy access to the central plains of Ireland. Trading with England and Europe followed which required port facilities, so the development of Dublin Port is inextricably linked to the development of Dublin City, so it is fair to say the origins of the Port go back over one thousand years. As a result, the modern organisation Dublin Port has a long and remarkable history, dating back over 300 years from 1707.

The original Port of Dublin was situated upriver, a few miles from its current location near the modern Civic Offices at Wood Quay and close to Christchurch Cathedral. The Port remained close to that area until the new Custom House opened in the 1790s. In medieval times Dublin shipped cattle hides to Britain and the continent, and the returning ships carried wine, pottery and other goods.

510 acres. The modern Dublin Port is located either side of the River Liffey, out to its mouth. On the north side of the river, the central part (205 hectares or 510 acres) of the Port lies at the end of East Wall and North Wall, from Alexandra Quay.

Dublin Port Company is a State-owned commercial company responsible for operating and developing Dublin Port.

Dublin Port Company is a self-financing, and profitable private limited company wholly-owned by the State, whose business is to manage Dublin Port, Ireland's premier Port. Established as a corporate entity in 1997, Dublin Port Company is responsible for the management, control, operation and development of the Port.

Captain William Bligh (of Mutiny of the Bounty fame) was a visitor to Dublin in 1800, and his visit to the capital had a lasting effect on the Port. Bligh's study of the currents in Dublin Bay provided the basis for the construction of the North Wall. This undertaking led to the growth of Bull Island to its present size.

Yes. Dublin Port is the largest freight and passenger port in Ireland. It handles almost 50% of all trade in the Republic of Ireland.

All cargo handling activities being carried out by private sector companies operating in intensely competitive markets within the Port. Dublin Port Company provides world-class facilities, services, accommodation and lands in the harbour for ships, goods and passengers.

Eamonn O'Reilly is the Dublin Port Chief Executive.

Capt. Michael McKenna is the Dublin Port Harbour Master

In 2019, 1,949,229 people came through the Port.

In 2019, there were 158 cruise liner visits.

In 2019, 9.4 million gross tonnes of exports were handled by Dublin Port.

In 2019, there were 7,898 ship arrivals.

In 2019, there was a gross tonnage of 38.1 million.

In 2019, there were 559,506 tourist vehicles.

There were 98,897 lorries in 2019

Boats can navigate the River Liffey into Dublin by using the navigational guidelines. Find the guidelines on this page here.

VHF channel 12. Commercial vessels using Dublin Port or Dun Laoghaire Port typically have a qualified pilot or certified master with proven local knowledge on board. They "listen out" on VHF channel 12 when in Dublin Port's jurisdiction.

A Dublin Bay webcam showing the south of the Bay at Dun Laoghaire and a distant view of Dublin Port Shipping is here
Dublin Port is creating a distributed museum on its lands in Dublin City.
 A Liffey Tolka Project cycle and pedestrian way is the key to link the elements of this distributed museum together.  The distributed museum starts at the Diving Bell and, over the course of 6.3km, will give Dubliners a real sense of the City, the Port and the Bay.  For visitors, it will be a unique eye-opening stroll and vista through and alongside one of Europe’s busiest ports:  Diving Bell along Sir John Rogerson’s Quay over the Samuel Beckett Bridge, past the Scherzer Bridge and down the North Wall Quay campshire to Berth 18 - 1.2 km.   Liffey Tolka Project - Tree-lined pedestrian and cycle route between the River Liffey and the Tolka Estuary - 1.4 km with a 300-metre spur along Alexandra Road to The Pumphouse (to be completed by Q1 2021) and another 200 metres to The Flour Mill.   Tolka Estuary Greenway - Construction of Phase 1 (1.9 km) starts in December 2020 and will be completed by Spring 2022.  Phase 2 (1.3 km) will be delivered within the following five years.  The Pumphouse is a heritage zone being created as part of the Alexandra Basin Redevelopment Project.  The first phase of 1.6 acres will be completed in early 2021 and will include historical port equipment and buildings and a large open space for exhibitions and performances.  It will be expanded in a subsequent phase to incorporate the Victorian Graving Dock No. 1 which will be excavated and revealed. 
 The largest component of the distributed museum will be The Flour Mill.  This involves the redevelopment of the former Odlums Flour Mill on Alexandra Road based on a masterplan completed by Grafton Architects to provide a mix of port operational uses, a National Maritime Archive, two 300 seat performance venues, working and studio spaces for artists and exhibition spaces.   The Flour Mill will be developed in stages over the remaining twenty years of Masterplan 2040 alongside major port infrastructure projects.

Source: Dublin Port Company ©Afloat 2020. 

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