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Displaying items by tag: Rosslare

TUG drivers and hauliers using Rosslare Europort have created a “stay home” message which has been captured by drone photography.

The formation of trailers and tugs into the words “Stay Home” is intended to appeal to non-essential travellers during the Covid-19 pandemic, Rosslare Europort says.

Over 20,000 trailers and trade cars have been handled through Rosslare Europort and the ports of Bilboa, Fishguard, Cherbourg, Pembroke and Zeebrugge over the last number of weeks, it says.

“While we greatly miss our passengers using the port, we thank you for staying at home during these very challenging times and look forward to seeing you again in the near future,” the port says in an appeal issued through Iarnród Éireann.

It says its current focus is on continuing to “ remain fully operational through the dedication of our frontline team”, working in conjunction with the shipping lines and haulage industry to deliver essential goods throughout Ireland.

“We are working hard and ask that you stay home,” the port says.

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Rosslare Harbour RNLI all-weather lifeboat was launched this afternoon (1 January) at 1.15pm to go to the assistance of a surfer caught in a dangerous rip current.

Two surfers had got caught in the rip current off Curracloe beach in Wexford. One of the surfers managed to get back to the beach where she quickly raised the alarm. With a strong south westerly force six to seven wind, the stranded surfer was soon a mile off shore.

Launched in minutes, the Rosslare Harbour lifeboat was joined on scene by Rescue 117, who located the lone surfer from the air and directed the lifeboat crew to the young man.

RNLI volunteer crew lifted the surfer to safety on board the lifeboat and provided warm and dry clothing for him on the return to the lifeboat station. He was met there by ambulance personnel who provided additional care.

Speaking after the incident Rosslare Harbour RNLI Volunteer Lifeboat Press Officer Jamie Ryan said, ‘It is wonderful to start the year with a successful rescue and thanks to the quick action of the surfer who made it safety ashore, we were on scene with the Coast Guard helicopter Rescue 117 in minutes and were able to bring the young man to safety.’

Published in RNLI Lifeboats
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Volunteer lifeboat crew with Rosslare RNLI launched this morning (Monday 16 October) during Storm Ophelia to rescue three men onboard a 10m yacht after they issued a Mayday. The crew had been trying to get to safety since the early hours and had attempted to gain entry to a few harbours but were constantly pushed back by winds and tides. Ten miles offshore from Rosslare and getting battered by the worsening weather they issued a Mayday before being rescued by the lifeboat crew.

Rosslare Harbour lifeboat, under the command of Coxswain Eamon O’Rourke launched with six volunteer crew and made the journey out to help the three men. Conditions were extremely challenging with force nine winds with a six metre sea swell. The lifeboat had to be carefully manoureved alongside the yacht by Coxswain O’Rourke to establish a tow.

The lifeboat crew made slow progress in the heavy weather but brought all three men safely ashore after 2pm at Rosslare Harbour.

Commenting on the call out, Dave Maloney, Rosslare RNLI Lifeboat Operations Manager said: ‘I am extremely proud of our crew. When the pagers went off this morning, as the storm was beginning to take hold, we had seven lifeboat crew down immediately to the station with a further six in reserve. Conditions were very unpleasant out there and we needed to get those three men to safety as quickly as possible.’

‘The crew of the yacht had been trying to come ashore since the early hours but were pushed back and ultimately unsuccessful. When the lifeboat crew reached them they were side on to the weather, taking a ferocious pounding and in danger of getting overwhelmed. I think if another hour had passed this story may not have had such a successful outcome.’

 

Published in RNLI Lifeboats
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Rosslare Harbour RNLI has responded to two call outs off the Wexford coast today.

The volunteer lifeboat crew was first requested to launch their all-weather lifeboat shortly after 9am this morning following a request from the Irish Coast Guard to go the assistance of a yacht which had sustained engine failure due to fuel problems.

The Swedish yacht with a man and woman onboard had been on passage from Arklow to Kinsale when it got into difficulty off Blackwater Bank.

The lifeboat under Coxswain Eamon O’Rourke and with seven crew members onboard launched at 9.15am and made its way to the scene.

Weather conditions at the time were good with a south westerly Force 4 wind.

The vessel which had a head wind down from Arklow had fuel problems causing the engine to fail. However, the sailors managed to start it again before the lifeboat arrived. To ensure it continued safely on passage, the lifeboat accompanied the sailors for an hour as the vessel made its way to Rosslare Europort.

The lifeboat was requested to launch for a second time today at approximately 3.30pm, this time following a report from the Irish Coast Guard that a small 2.5m rigid inflatable boat, thought to be unmanned was drifting out to sea from Rosslare Strand.

The lifeboat under Coxswain Eamon O’Rourke launched at 3.38pm. Weather conditions were good with sunny skies and a brisk south westerly Force 5-6 wind blowing.

Once on scene, the lifeboat crew set up a tow line and brought the vessel safely back to its moorings.

Speaking following the call out, Jamie Ryan, Rosslare Harbour RNLI Lifeboat Press Officer said: ‘It has been a busy day for the crew but our volunteers are always happy to help. We would remind anyone going to sea to respect the water. Always wear a lifejacket and harness where appropriate. Always have a means for calling and signalling for help and ensure everyone onboard knows how to use it. Always check the weather forecast and tide times. Make sure someone ashore knows where you are going and who to call if you don’t return on time. Learn how to start, run and maintain your engine and always carry tools and spares.’

Published in RNLI Lifeboats
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Rosslare Harbour RNLI has rescued three men this afternoon after their motorboat encountered mechanical problems and broke down off the Wexford coast.

The volunteer crew was requested to launch their all-weather lifeboat at 3pm following a report from the Irish Coast Guard that the vessel was in difficulty eight miles north east of Rosslare Harbour.

The lifeboat under Coxswain Eamon O’Rourke and with six crew members onboard launched immediately and made its way to the scene. The sailors had been on passage from Dun Laoghaire to Kilmore Quay when they began to encounter problems.

Weather conditions were good at the time with a slight westerly wind.

Once on scene at 3.30pm, the lifeboat crew stood by as the sailors got their vessel started again. The lifeboat then escorted the motorboat safely back to Rosslare Harbour.

Speaking following the call out, David Maloney, Rosslare Harbour RNLI Lifeboat Operations Manager said: ‘Sailing and motorboating are popular pastimes and particularly so at this time of year. We would remind sailors and anyone taking to sea to always wear a lifejacket. Always have a means for calling or signalling for help and ensure everyone onboard knows how to use it. Always check the weather forecast and tide times and make sure someone ashore knows where you are going and who to call if you don’t return on time. And should you get into trouble, dial 999 or 112 and ask for the Coast Guard. The RNLI provides a 24 hour search and rescue service and our volunteers at Rosslare Harbour are always ready and willing to help.’

Published in RNLI Lifeboats
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#PeopleHidden - A truck with some 14 people writes Independent.ie were found hidden having arrived by ferry at Rosslare Harbour on Sunday afternoon.

Garda Immigration Officers discovered the 12 men and two women during a routine search after the ship from France docked around 2pm.

The people were found inside a refrigerated trailer unit aboard the Irish Ferries Oscar Wilde ferry.

It is understood that apples were being transported in the truck and the temperature of the unit was around 5 degrees.

For more on the story click here.

Published in Ferry

#Shipping - Five people were found in a shipping container in Wexford at the weekend, as BreakingNews.ie reports.

The three men, a woman and a young girl, all believed to be Kurdish, were discovered at a haulage yard in New Ross on Sunday evening (16 October) in a container thought to have come in on a ferry from Cherbourg to Rosslare Europort.

Gardaí said the five, who were in good health, are being detained under immigration law — and are claiming asylum due to persecution in their home region.

According to TheJournal.ie, New Ross is also where nine Kurdish refugees were found in the back of a truck after stowing away on a ferry from France to Rosslare this past February.

Published in Ports & Shipping

Rosslare Harbour RNLI launched last night to four young men attempting a record-breaking row off the UK coast after they requested assistance in worsening weather conditions. They were brought to safety by Rosslare Harbour RNLI in a call out that lasted over six hours as the all-weather lifeboat towed the 24-foot rowing boat out of the channel and back to the safety of Rosslare harbour.

The four young rowers have had to set aside their record attempt after setting off from Tower in London 10 days ago to row around the UK coast. After leaving London they came up through Bristol channel and out into the open sea. However the weather was worsening last night and they found themselves battling the elements 22 miles off the Irish coast. Conditions were fresh with a north north-westerly wind gusting 25 knots. It was then hey made the decision to contact the Coast Guard and request help.

Volunteer lifeboat crew at Rosslare Harbour RNLI received the call at 6.15pm and launched in minutes. When on scene an hour later they checked if the young men were okay before establishing a tow and bringing the craft back slowly so as not to part the tow to the safety of Rosslare Harbour. The tow took six hours. The four rowers are currently being looked after in Rosslare before they decide on their next move.

Commenting on the call out Rosslare RNLI Lifeboat Operations Manager David Maloney said: ‘This call out was a good example of people recognising the importance of calling for help early when they realise they may be getting into difficulty. The group were dealing with worsening weather conditions and a changing tide which was taking them further from where they needed to be, all while they were mid-channel on a record attempt.’

However they didn’t let this sway them and raised the alarm bringing help. They had the right safety equipment and made a call quickly. If they had waited until things got worse and help was not close enough, it could have ended very differently. I have no doubt they will achieve any records they set their mind to in future.’

Published in RNLI Lifeboats
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#Kitesurfing - A new surf school in Rosslare opening in mid June aims to get the Irish hooked on kiteboarding, as the Wexford People reports.

Taking heed of the success of events like this past weekend's Battle for the Bay, and his first school in Duncannon established in 2009, Niall Roche's latest venture is Hooked on Rosslare.

The "full-offering watersports centre" will provide lessons not only in kitesurfing and stand up paddle boarding but also windsurfing, kayaking and sailing.

What's more, the centre also hosts a water park buoyed off Rosslare Strand for the summer months.

And it's not even the only initiative on Roche's plate this summer, as he and his wife Christina are organising the Irish National Kite Surfing Championships in Duncannon on 14 August.

The Wexford People has more on the story HERE.

Published in Kitesurfing
20th April 2016

A Fascinating Lifeboat Man

I said words in tribute to a Lifeboatman on radio this week that I have never said before as I introduced my programme (scroll down the page for the podcast). I meant them and I was honoured to be able to speak them about a man who has spent 42 years with the RNLI at what I regard as a famous lifeboat station. This is what I said on the programme:

“Thank you for joining me on this marine voyage in which we will hear a particularly interesting interview with a lifeboatman and the changes he has experienced in a 42-year career with the RNLI, Tony Kehoe of the famous Rosslare Lifeboat Station talks frankly about a life rescuing people in trouble at sea in a way in which I’ve never before heard a lifeboatman being so direct and clear about the good, the bad and the tough aspects of a career aboard lifeboats.”

Tony spoke of rescue work in older lifeboats and how they could be hard to handle! And about a time when “someone knocked on your door in the middle of the night and said you were needed at the lifeboat…” He talked of the changes, particularly in the speed of lifeboats getting to the scene of a rescue or tragedy faster and requiring quicker responses by the crew to a variety of issues arising from that speed over the water and also, what it does to the body physically, when hitting waves at speeds of 16 knots and more, rather than 8 knots in older boats.

He comes of a family with huge commitment to the lifeboat service and two of his sons also joined Rosslare Station. I was very impressed by his interview and particularly what he told Niamh Stephenson, also of the RNLI who did the interview for the programme, about the most important requirements for a good lifeboat crew ---- “being part of a team, trusting each other..” and his final wish for those who carry on the service: “Mind yourselves….”

I am confident that you will enjoy listening to his interview and will appreciate even more, the value of the lifeboat service when you have heard it.

In that regard I commend to you May Day, Sunday May 1, at the National Concert Hall in Dublin, where I intend to be, to hear the Wexford Sinfonia Orchestra play their five-part suite, ‘HEROES OF THE HELEN BLAKE,’ a tribute to the men of the Fethard-on-Sea Lifeboat who died in the rescue service to the sailing cargo ship, Mexico. The members of the orchestra range in age from 14 to 80. The performance will begin at 3 p.m. MAY DAY is the annual Fundraising Day for the lifeboats. Tickets are €20, students €15 and can be bought at the Box Office at the Concert Hall or online at www.nch.ie  Do support the lifeboats on this day….

THIS ISLAND NATION reports on the maritime traditions, culture, history and modern marine developments in our island nation. Your comments are always welcome. Email: [email protected]

Published in Island Nation
Page 1 of 4

About Dublin Port 

Dublin Port Company is currently investing about €277 million on its Alexandra Basin Redevelopment (ABR), which is due to be complete by 2021. The redevelopment will improve the port's capacity for large ships by deepening and lengthening 3km of its 7km of berths. The ABR is part of a €1bn capital programme up to 2028, which will also include initial work on the Dublin Port’s MP2 Project - a major capital development project proposal for works within the existing port lands in the northeastern part of the port.

Dublin Port has also recently secured planning approval for the development of the next phase of its inland port near Dublin Airport. The latest stage of the inland port will include a site with the capacity to store more than 2,000 shipping containers and infrastructures such as an ESB substation, an office building and gantry crane.

Dublin Port Company recently submitted a planning application for a €320 million project that aims to provide significant additional capacity at the facility within the port in order to cope with increases in trade up to 2040. The scheme will see a new roll-on/roll-off jetty built to handle ferries of up to 240 metres in length, as well as the redevelopment of an oil berth into a deep-water container berth.

Dublin Port FAQ

Dublin was little more than a monastic settlement until the Norse invasion in the 8th and 9th centuries when they selected the Liffey Estuary as their point of entry to the country as it provided relatively easy access to the central plains of Ireland. Trading with England and Europe followed which required port facilities, so the development of Dublin Port is inextricably linked to the development of Dublin City, so it is fair to say the origins of the Port go back over one thousand years. As a result, the modern organisation Dublin Port has a long and remarkable history, dating back over 300 years from 1707.

The original Port of Dublin was situated upriver, a few miles from its current location near the modern Civic Offices at Wood Quay and close to Christchurch Cathedral. The Port remained close to that area until the new Custom House opened in the 1790s. In medieval times Dublin shipped cattle hides to Britain and the continent, and the returning ships carried wine, pottery and other goods.

510 acres. The modern Dublin Port is located either side of the River Liffey, out to its mouth. On the north side of the river, the central part (205 hectares or 510 acres) of the Port lies at the end of East Wall and North Wall, from Alexandra Quay.

Dublin Port Company is a State-owned commercial company responsible for operating and developing Dublin Port.

Dublin Port Company is a self-financing, and profitable private limited company wholly-owned by the State, whose business is to manage Dublin Port, Ireland's premier Port. Established as a corporate entity in 1997, Dublin Port Company is responsible for the management, control, operation and development of the Port.

Captain William Bligh (of Mutiny of the Bounty fame) was a visitor to Dublin in 1800, and his visit to the capital had a lasting effect on the Port. Bligh's study of the currents in Dublin Bay provided the basis for the construction of the North Wall. This undertaking led to the growth of Bull Island to its present size.

Yes. Dublin Port is the largest freight and passenger port in Ireland. It handles almost 50% of all trade in the Republic of Ireland.

All cargo handling activities being carried out by private sector companies operating in intensely competitive markets within the Port. Dublin Port Company provides world-class facilities, services, accommodation and lands in the harbour for ships, goods and passengers.

Eamonn O'Reilly is the Dublin Port Chief Executive.

Capt. Michael McKenna is the Dublin Port Harbour Master

In 2019, 1,949,229 people came through the Port.

In 2019, there were 158 cruise liner visits.

In 2019, 9.4 million gross tonnes of exports were handled by Dublin Port.

In 2019, there were 7,898 ship arrivals.

In 2019, there was a gross tonnage of 38.1 million.

In 2019, there were 559,506 tourist vehicles.

There were 98,897 lorries in 2019

Boats can navigate the River Liffey into Dublin by using the navigational guidelines. Find the guidelines on this page here.

VHF channel 12. Commercial vessels using Dublin Port or Dun Laoghaire Port typically have a qualified pilot or certified master with proven local knowledge on board. They "listen out" on VHF channel 12 when in Dublin Port's jurisdiction.

A Dublin Bay webcam showing the south of the Bay at Dun Laoghaire and a distant view of Dublin Port Shipping is here
Dublin Port is creating a distributed museum on its lands in Dublin City.
 A Liffey Tolka Project cycle and pedestrian way is the key to link the elements of this distributed museum together.  The distributed museum starts at the Diving Bell and, over the course of 6.3km, will give Dubliners a real sense of the City, the Port and the Bay.  For visitors, it will be a unique eye-opening stroll and vista through and alongside one of Europe’s busiest ports:  Diving Bell along Sir John Rogerson’s Quay over the Samuel Beckett Bridge, past the Scherzer Bridge and down the North Wall Quay campshire to Berth 18 - 1.2 km.   Liffey Tolka Project - Tree-lined pedestrian and cycle route between the River Liffey and the Tolka Estuary - 1.4 km with a 300-metre spur along Alexandra Road to The Pumphouse (to be completed by Q1 2021) and another 200 metres to The Flour Mill.   Tolka Estuary Greenway - Construction of Phase 1 (1.9 km) starts in December 2020 and will be completed by Spring 2022.  Phase 2 (1.3 km) will be delivered within the following five years.  The Pumphouse is a heritage zone being created as part of the Alexandra Basin Redevelopment Project.  The first phase of 1.6 acres will be completed in early 2021 and will include historical port equipment and buildings and a large open space for exhibitions and performances.  It will be expanded in a subsequent phase to incorporate the Victorian Graving Dock No. 1 which will be excavated and revealed. 
 The largest component of the distributed museum will be The Flour Mill.  This involves the redevelopment of the former Odlums Flour Mill on Alexandra Road based on a masterplan completed by Grafton Architects to provide a mix of port operational uses, a National Maritime Archive, two 300 seat performance venues, working and studio spaces for artists and exhibition spaces.   The Flour Mill will be developed in stages over the remaining twenty years of Masterplan 2040 alongside major port infrastructure projects.

Source: Dublin Port Company ©Afloat 2020. 

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