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Displaying items by tag: SB20

Say what you like about the SB20s, but you have to commend the class and its President John Malone of Lough Ree YC for always being game to have a go. Back in September 2020, when everyone else reckoned they’d squeezed in just as much sailing as was possible with COVID-19 sweeping in over all horizons, the SB 20s' hopes for a short and sweet series on Lough Derg in the second weekend of October was probably the last tattered banner to be shot away.

Now they’re showing a fresh new pennant or two above the rims of the bunkers to which they retreated for the duration, with these replacement banners signalling hopes for doing the business afloat during 2021. They anticipate that training sessions may be under way from May 10th onwards, and beyond that the programme (subject to the pandemic regulations of the day) is posted as follows:

  • 2-4 July Westerns (DL Regatta One Design Event, 3 Day Event)
  • 24-25 July Northerns (Carlingford Lough Sailing Club)
  • 31 July-6th Aug LRYC Annual Regatta (3 or 7 Days Entry Available)*
  • 14 – 15 Aug. Southerns (Royal Cork Yacht Club, Crosshaven)
  • 29 Aug- 3 Sept. Cascais Worlds (Clube Naval de Cascais, Portugal)*
  • 4-5 Sept. Gortmore Bell (Lough Derg, Iniscealtra SC)*
  • 17-19 Sept. Nationals (Lough Ree YC)
  • 24-26 Sept. UK Nationals (Royal Torbay YC, England)*
  • 9-10 October. Midlands (Keelboat Regatta, Lough Derg YC)

* items not part of traveller series

In online conferences during the dark days, the international class has introduced some new rules, including one which allows a 3:1 block arrangement on the jib sheets, which should widen the crewing options to less powerful individuals.

As for anyone interested in joining the class as an owner, it seems that SB20 folk would never resort to anything so vulgar as advertising their boats for sale, but if you contact John Malone at [email protected] he might point you in the right direction.

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As previously reported in Afloat, the Irish SB20 fleet was awarded the 2023 World Championships, to be held in the National Yacht Club, Dun Laoghaire in September 2023. As a consequence, the sportsboat class have seen a resurgence with an influx of boats in 2020, both new and old, as teams gear up for the first World Championships in home waters since 2008. According to Class President John Malone, several more boats are expected to join the fleet throughout 2021 and 2022 as preparations for the Worlds intensify.

First to dip their toes in the water were Kevin Fenton and John McGonigle. Kevin sailed his first SB event at the Lough Derg Freshwater Regatta in late 2019 and was instantly smitten. So much so, that he immediately went in search of an SB20 to buy. As luck would have it, Ewen Barry offered the highly decorated and ultra-quick "Bango" 3065 for sale at that time, and Kevin didn't hesitate. Although Covid-19 restricted national and regional competitions in the early parts of the season, Kevin, sailing with John McGonigle and 420 hotshot Ben Graf on the tiller, used the opportunity to practice their manoeuvres and to get up to speed in the boat, training with the ever-friendly and ever-expanding Lough Ree fleet. In early August, Bango made their championship debut at the Western Championships held out of the Royal St George Yacht Club and got their first taste for SB20 racing in the waters where the Worlds will be sailed.

Also making their debut at the season's delayed curtain-raiser were the new owners of "Tiger Lite" 3184. Tiger Lite was bought by Ruth Loughrey just prior to the event, and there was a frantic race to get the boat race ready before the event. 2020 DBSC class captain Sarah Dwyer volunteered to show the new owners the ropes and hopped on board with Ruth, Ben Loughrey and Dermot Tynan for the event. Although the overall weight combo with four sailors didn't suit the light and variable conditions, reports were that the new owners were delighted to get some expert tuition from an experienced SBer on all aspects of SB20 boat handling. It is understood that Tiger Lite will be sailed out of the Royal Irish Yacht Club for the 2021 season.

New SB20 from White Formula Boats UK

September saw the arrival of the latest boat out of the mould from White Formula Boats UK, the licenced manufacturer of SB20s. "Ted 2 – Tammi-Lyn" 3809, was brought in by the experienced team of Davey Taylor, Ed Cook and Michael O'Connor. Sadly, a Covid-19 resurgence at the end of the summer resulting in a cancellation of the nationals prevented Ted 2 - Tammi-Lyn from making its debut in 2020 and the lads trying out their new toy.

October saw Eoin Leahy and Donie Heggarty bring the highly-rated "Uber" 3720, winner of the 2016 UK Nationals, over to Ireland. Eoin and Donie are no strangers to the SB20 class having bought "Strictly Business" 3272, a couple of years ago when they decided to dip their toes back into the SB20 fleet. Eoin, winner of the first SB20 Irish nationals in 2007 with Nin O'Leary, and Donie, no stranger himself to the sharp end of competitive fleets, have already built a formidable team. Having spent two years polishing and optimising Strictly Business to within an inch of its life, the pair decided that a newer hull was in order for their 2023 Worlds campaign, hence Uber's purchase.

Thankfully, the market for good second-hand SB20s is strong at the moment and a fully kitted out, pre-loved SB20 like "Strictly Business" wasn't going to stay on the shelf for long. In what is another case of the return of the prodigal son, the SB20 class is delighted to welcome back James Ives from Carlingford. James previously sailed 3146 for a number of years before taking a break from SB20s. In an exciting development for the class in the North East, it is understood that James intends to race Strictly Business on Carlingford Lough in addition to doing the SB20 circuit. Although the class have often raced in Carlingford, most recently in 2016, they were not previously able to gain a foothold in the club.

Not to be outdone by the resurgence in the North East, the formidable Cork duo of Aidan McSweeney and Mel Collins has also decided to re-enter the fray for the 2021 season. It is not yet known who will fill the third berth. Both Aidan and Mel have racked up top quality results at past SB20 Worlds. Aidan recently brought "Gold Digger" 3044 in from the UK, and although likely to be one of the older tubs in the fleet, with the lasting build quality of SB20s, it is expected that they will be "on the pace" for 2021. 3044 is from a well-known batch of top-quality SB20s including Mel's former boat (sail no. 3045), current Class President John Malone's hull (sail no. 3040) and a multiple world championship-winning hull (sail no. 3042).

Finally, in late November, "KnowHowDo" 3490 (formerly Dinghy Supplies) was purchased by John Malone to get her dusted down and race-ready for 2021. KnowHowDo sat out the 2019 and 2020 seasons but prior to that, KnowHowDo had a very strong race record both nationally and internationally under the team from Howth of Darragh Sheridan, Shane Murphy and John Phelan. We look forward to seeing KnowHowDo back on the water in 2021. As John Malone can't sail two boats at once, it is understood that a new entrant to the class will be taking the reins of KnowHowDo for the 2021 season and the boat will be racing regularly out of Lough Ree Yacht Club.

SB20 Class President John Malone

Class President John Malone added: "it is exciting to see so many additions to the fleet for the 2021 season as we build towards the Worlds in 2023. Having beginner, intermediate and experienced crews joining the fleet now augurs really well for the class. Although activities were heavily curtailed in 2020, we have an exciting programme of events and training scheduled for 2021 and we look forward to seeing all of these boats and their crews on the water in 2021. In addition, we would call on any former SBers that have boats in storage to get in contact with us. We would be delighted to help them get back out on the water or if they are looking to move their boats along, we can help them find a new home."

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At midnight on Friday, the lockdown shutters came down on the million-plus inhabitants of a place that no longer exists. And no, we don't mean that Dublin has obviously become a ghost town. But what we do mean is that when the powers-that-be start firing off diktats as to what the people of County Dublin can or cannot do as regards socialising and travel, they're talking of a place that is at one with Nineveh and Tyre.

For County Dublin as an administrative area has long since been replaced by the fiercely independent Dukedoms of Dun Laoghaire-Rathedown and South Dublin, the Commune of Dublin City, and to the north by the Viking Fortress of Fingal, the Land of the Fair Strangers. Denmark West, in other words, where we're bygge on hygge.

Lough Ree's racing was livelyLough Ree's racing was lively. Photo Mary Paul Mulligan

Doubtless m'learned friends will have a field day if legal actions are taken on the basis of prohibitions relating to this Dublin County place. But the rest of us know that, just as you should be wary of a car coming off the production line on a Friday afternoon, so you should be wary of the ultimate validity of official pronouncements made at that same time.

Thus the sailing community, being responsible citizens, cancelled the weekend's events left right and centre in the greater Dublin area. But way down the road on the lakes and wherever – the Land Beyond The Pale – they were indeed well beyond the Pale, as they continued to work in their suntans at Lough Ree Yacht Club, which gallantly manages to put a meaningful if very reduced programme together to comply with limitations while celebrating their Quarter Millennium with racing on Friday and Saturday, and then on Sunday the SB20s moved to Lough Derg YC for the first race of their Sunday Series.

While Dublin went into paralysis, Race Officer Alan Algeo and Regatta Organiser Jonny Swann were working hard on their elbow bumps and suntans down Lough Ree wayWhile Dublin went into paralysis, Race Officer Alan Algeo and Regatta Organiser Jonny Swann were working hard on their elbow bumps and suntans down Lough Ree way. Photo: John Malone

At Lough Ree, it was the Homecoming Regatta organised by Jonny Swan (that's the Swan of Classic Half Tonner Harmony when he's on salt water) with racing for SB20s, Shannon One Designs, and cruisers, with the pace being set by the SB20s.

They hope that this will lead on to a big-fleet SB20 Midlands at Lough Derg on 10th/11th, as our Midlands Messiah points out that the imprisonment of Dubliners – if the powers-that-be mean three weeks when they say three weeks – should actually end at 23.59 on 9th October.

Meanwhile on Sunday at Lough Ree, the SB20 racing was concluded with Eoin Leahy and Donie Heraghty on Strictly Business winning overall with 9 points to the 11 of Bango (Commodore John McGonigle & Kevin Fenton), which had been helmed by Cillian Dickson on the Saturday and young Ben Graf on the Sunday, with third slot on 14pts going to Ken Hudson of Arklow’s Serius Black helmed by Aidan Breen with third hand Niall Smythe.

Conditions were so light on Sunday that racing an SB20 with just two was a possibilityConditions were so light on Sunday that racing an SB20 with just two was a possibility. Photo: Brian McElligott

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The Royal Southern Yacht Club in Southampton welcomes the SB20 Class for four days of action. On Thursday 16th September, the SB20 UK Sprint Championship is a stand-alone event with the SB20 fleet blasting along through six back-to-back short, sharp races.

The SB20 National Championships 2020 will be held 17th-20th September with ten races scheduled on their own windward-leeward course.

Hot favourite for the championship will be John Pollard’s Xcellent. However, strong competition is expected from McAdam & Whelan’s Breaking Bod and Gillet & Hines’ PBII. Expect fireworks from Ollie Hill’s young guns on Ethel and James Howells’ Gelert, featuring the Bedford Pack. Simon Russell’s Sportsboatworld has a stellar team of Ben McGrane and Jamie Lee.

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SB20 sailors Luke Johnson and Eoin Leahy were winners of the North Shannon Yacht Club Regatta's Portlick Cup sailed at the weekend.

The North Shannon Regatta normally hosted further north on the river being sailed in the waters to the North of Lough Ree Yacht Club over 2 days due to the Kildare lockdown affecting the logistics of the usual organisers.

Upwind from Startline - Race 4, Day 2 SB20 North Shannon, Portlick CupUpwind from Startline - Race 4, Day 2 SB20 North Shannon, Portlick Cup

This was the first time (according to the RO, Ian Croxon) the North Shannon Yacht Club had hosted two fleets simultaneously at an event (in its 100 year history). A bottle of Moet Champagne was presented to the Helm of SB20 Strictly Business for winning the first SB20 race hosted by the North Shannon Yacht Club.

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The SB20 class were overwhelmed by an enthusiastic response from Techworks Marine to sponsor this first event of the season, for which the class are very appreciative, and the marine data company were represented on the water by CEO, Charlotte O’Kelly helming the only all-girl team this weekend.

Team George with Sailing Manager Ronan Adams, Darius in the boathouse and Jamie in the dining room, smoothly facilitated the first COVID event in the club this year.

We are living in a different world now with online registration, Covid declarations, updated SOPs and a virtual briefing. SB20 veteran RO Barry O’Neill did the honours with his ‘pod’ team and RSGYC mark layers. The George managed a thoroughly enjoyable event, while ensuring safety protocols were observed both afloat and ashore.

Saturday’s forecast had us all armed with factor 50 and water as we headed out to the race area, near the anchorage as we competed for space with DBSC racing and the Fireball Nationals. A breeze of 5-7 knots, occasionally gusting 10, and a strong flooding tide proved challenging, and although the day was warm, with wind direction fairly consistent from a NE direction, sadly no sea breeze developed.

The first two races of the WW/LW course became drag races out to the right, but the fleet split in the slack tide for the final race of the day. There was just one general recall, with the fleet consistently on the line, battling for spots all weekend. After racing, we withdrew to the balcony for post mortem and drinks before a delicious dinner in the dining room.

As Afloat reported previously, overnight there were just two points separating the top three boats Ted, SoBlue and Bád, so umpires Ailbe and Eunice stepped up to ensure the lead boats behaved. Racing was closer to the harbour, and a stronger breeze split the fleet across the race area both up and downwind.

SoBlue NYC won the first race on Sunday, and Bád the second. With one more race to go, the top three boats were on just 7 points apiece.

The final two lap race had CM Provident with John Malone, Emmet Sheridan and Luke Johnson from LRYC led the fleet around the weather mark, followed by TED, Bád in fourth and SoBlue lying 6th. Ted took the lead down the run with an 8 boat lead over Bád in second up the second beat.

A 25-degree shift up the second beat brought Doran’s LoFly back into contention and Bád sneaking ahead of Ted at the WW mark. A nip and tuck down the last run of the weekend, resulted in SoBlue now chasing hard and lying fourth behind LoFly. Bád held onto their lead of about 3 boat lengths with a split at the final gate. SoBlue headed for the left gate and Ted and Soblue went for the right.

With just a 300m beat to the finish, Bád tacked to cover, while Ted and SoBlue benefited from more breeze on the left side of the short leg to the finish. A tacking duel ensued between Bád and Ted but Bád had enough in the bag to cross one boat length ahead of Ted, taking the title by a point, SoBlue took fourth place in the race, just 2 or 3 boat lengths behind, securing third place overall.

Provident CRM took the Silver fleet trophy home to Lough Ree.

In a competitive fleet where one error can cost so dearly, the two additions to the fleet (Bango from a burgeoning fleet in LRYC and Tiger Light from the RIYC) were doing well to keep in sight of the pack at all, and showed promise in the mix at times.

A socially distanced prize giving took place on the balcony with RSGYC Commodore Peter Bowring doing the honours and a short speech regarding the 2023 Worlds coming to the NYC by SB20 Council World President, Jerry Dowling.

The next SB20 event is in NYC on the 5/6th September and the SB20 Nationals will take place in Lough Ree on 18-20th September.

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Heading into day two of the SB20 ‘Western’ Championships hosted by the Royal St George YC, and after confounding conditions out in the bay, three Dun Laoghaire waterfront Clubs will battle it out, with just two points separating first and third overall.

As Afloat reported previously, the 13-boat event is the first of the year on the SB20 circuit.

TED sailed by RStGYC's (Michael O’Connor, Davy Taylor and Philip O’Connor) lie in first place overnight on five points. SoBlue NYC & RSGYC (Chris Helme, Justin Burke and Alan Coffey) are on six points and late entry, Bád RIYC (Stephan Hyde, Jimmy and Jerry Dowling) on seven.

RO Barry O’Neill and his team have three races scheduled today for the Techworks Marine Sponsored event with on the water umpires joining the fleet.

Published in SB20

The overall winner of the Lough Ree 250 SB20 event was John Malone and Emmet Sheridan's 'Slippery Nipple' 3040, with Patrick Whyte as bowman.

There were race wins for five SB20s in the eight-race 250 Regatta to celebrate 250 years of the River Shannon club.

Eoin Leahy, Donie Hearaghty and Luke Johnson won the Andrew Mannion Trophy for race one.

Lough Ree 250 Regatta Plate PrizeHusband & Wife Team Liz & Martin MacNamara on-board Jude Kilmartin's Sharkbait took line Honours in race six to win the Lifeboat plate.

Racing continues this week with a lay day Tuesday.

Lough Ree Yacht Club Race Officer Alex HobbsLough Ree Yacht Club Race Officer Alex Hobbs

The regatta is warm-up for the first SB20 Regional event of 2020 will be hosted by RStGYC this coming weekend 8/9 August on Dublin Bay.

SB20 Lough Ree 250 results

 

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Given the busy schedule of events set between now and the end of the season in October, it looks like the Irish SB20 class is not letting COVID-19 push it too far off course. According to its revised fixtures calendar (below), crews could manage to get in as much sailing as they would have in any other season.

The class is based on Lough Ree, Lough Derg and Dublin Bay, where there are active local scenes. There is a serious push on to promote the three-person class across Ireland with a view to a robust national turnout for the 2023 SB20 Worlds that will be staged at the National Yacht Club on Dublin Bay.

The first regional event this season is now on the 8th August, hosted by the Royal St George Yacht Club, with a fleet of 15 boats expected. Barry O'Neill is the Race Officer in charge of the two-day event.

2020 Irish SB20 calendar

August
1st Regional - Royal St George YC, Dublin Bay 8/9 Aug

September
Easterns - Royal Irish YC, Dublin Bay, 6/7 Sept (Previously Scheduled scheduled for May as part of DL Cup)
Nationals - Lough Ree YC, Athlone, 18-20 Sept

October
Midlands - Lough Derg YC, Dromineer, 10/11 Oct

New dealer

The Dublin based Rope Dock firm has been appointed as the new SB20 dealer for Ireland.

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Not every sailing class in Ireland gets a monthly update from its President which opens with a quote from Vladimir Ilyich Lenin. But then, it’s not every Class President who can so readily re-organise his busy working week that he’s able to disappear off into the wide blue yonder at less than 24 hours notice as co-skipper on a MiniTransat 650, campaigning the 320-mile Dun Laoghaire to Dingle Race.

Yet it’s all in a week’s work, as you might say, for Irish SB20 Class President John Malone of Lough Ree Yacht Club, who was in the front of the queue when the fates were distributing treble doses of lifetime energy. He had sailed just once on Galway Bay with Yannick Lemonnier on the MiniTransat 650 Port of Galway. But last June, with PoG already in Dun Laoghaire and all set to go in the Dingle race, it had looked like no-go for the little boat, as Yannick’s regular co-skipper Dan Mill had sustained a knee injury which wasn’t going to come right within a week, let alone overnight.

Racing a MiniTrasat is highly athletic, and you have to be 200% fit to do it. But regularly racing in an SB20 isn’t exactly a case of lolling about on the lee deck enjoying the sunshine either. So in a stroke of genius, Yannick thought to ring John as a long shot, and he hit the bullseye, getting an instant able shipmate, and at the same time providing the rest of us with the off-the-wall Malone view of what it’s like to race flat-out offshore in a 21ft boat that at times was out-performing boats well over twice her size.

sb20 malone ocoineen2“John Malone shakes hands on big deal with Enda O Coineen” Any business page editor would give his eye teeth to publish a photo with that caption. Yet it just happens to be a different John Malone, but there’s no doubting the legendary strength of the President of the Irish SB20 Class’s pre-Covid-19 handshake grip on Enda at the class’s annual dinner at the beginning of March in the Royal Irish YC in Dun Laoghaire. Also in photo are SB20 World Council President Jerry Dowling and prize-winner Jimmy Dowling

So when the latest SB20 missive pinged in this weekend, we wondered what John Malone would think of next. And in his opening Presidential musings on the current crazy situation, he thought that Russia’s revolutionary Lenin was appropriate, and gave it both barrels: “There are decades when nothing happens” said Vladimir Ilyich Lenin, “and there are weeks when decades happen”.

Quite. Make of that what you will, and how it relates to our peculiar times. Some of us aren’t even sure what times those are. A very keen and extremely frustrated sailing man we know asked his wife of many years in their shared lock-down what day it was, and she replied: “ It’s May……I think”.

Anyway, John Malone tell us that recent days have been a period where a decade of progress has been made in the Irish SB20 class in a week, due in no small part to the prodigious negotiating and presentation skills of Justin Burke and his team from the National Yacht Club in securing the SB20 Worlds for the 8th to 15th September 2023.

sb20 prizes3The youngest prize-winning helm in Irish SB20 racing is 16-year-old Ben Graff of Lough Ree YC. He couldn’t be at the dinner, but clubmate Emmet Sheridan (centre) collected the Mephisto Cup on his behalf from Irish Class President John Malone (left) and SB20 World Council President Jerry Dowling.

This reflects the fact that the class’s international programme has been shifted back a clear year, with 2020 - in terms of global events – becoming the Year That Never Was. Thus in the re-invigorated and rapidly-growing Irish SB20 group of travellers, they’re looking forward to the big one in Cascais in Portugal in 2021 (29th August to 3rd September). Then while the worlds of 2022 may be too distant in Singapore, the Europeans at St Petersburg in Russia may tempt, and then suddenly it’s 2023 and everyone’s in Ireland,

But while the international programme may be hyper-reduced or non-existent this year, the Irish class is active right now in developing Online Coaching and Virtual Regatta during May, supported by a grant from Irish Sailing. It starts on the evening of this Tuesday – 8.0pm May 12th – and continues for three weeks in all under the direction of Shane Hughes from North Sails, the agenda for the first night giving us a flavour of it all:

  • 1 Preparation – planning your programme/campaign efficiently
  • 2 Upwind focus – trim & setup, kinetics & weight movement to improve performance, onboard communication
  • 3 Focus on tacks – what elements feed into the perfect tack
  • 4 Windward mark-roundings and sets - straight set or gybe set? Which to go for and why – will include rules discussion.
  • 5 Virtual Regatta – 3 races 

More details and registration from this link - please note that the Training Session is only open to SB20 Class Association members, but up to 4 registrations are allowed per member boat.

As for Actual Sailing In Real Time (I suppose somebody has long since noticed that the acronym for In Real Time is IRL….?) the SB20s will, of course, be afloat and racing as soon as there’s the slightest hint of permission from Sports Ireland and Sailing Ireland while bearing in mind the proven military dictum that you should always be planning, but any rigidly fixed plan never survives the first contact with the enemy.

President Malone rounds out his lively bulletin with fond memories of the class’s annual dinner, which was staged at the Royal Irish Yacht Club in early March just days before the Lockdown, and those present naturally included the SB20 World Council President, for he happens to be Ireland’s own Jerry Dowling, and also celebrity Irish S B20 sailor Enda O'Coineen. This provided a photograph which business page editors might mistakenly leap at, of John Malone giving Enda O'Coineen a very firm handshake. Not the John Malone they would be thinking of, maybe. But there’s no doubting the strength of that handshake.

sb20 prizes4Getting ready to party as if there’s no tomorrow, which in a very real way was true. Former Irish Class President Colin Galvin (right) receives the Sin Bin Trophy for Services to the SB20 Class from Irish President John Malone and World Council President Jerry Dowling at the Irish class’s annual dinner, the last major sailing social event before the Lockdown camped into place.

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About Dublin Port 

Dublin Port is Ireland’s largest and busiest port with approximately 17,000 vessel movements per year. As well as being the country’s largest port, Dublin Port has the highest rate of growth and, in the seven years to 2019, total cargo volumes grew by 36.1%.

The vision of Dublin Port Company is to have the required capacity to service the needs of its customers and the wider economy safely, efficiently and sustainably. Dublin Port will integrate with the City by enhancing the natural and built environments. The Port is being developed in line with Masterplan 2040.

Dublin Port Company is currently investing about €277 million on its Alexandra Basin Redevelopment (ABR), which is due to be complete by 2021. The redevelopment will improve the port's capacity for large ships by deepening and lengthening 3km of its 7km of berths. The ABR is part of a €1bn capital programme up to 2028, which will also include initial work on the Dublin Port’s MP2 Project - a major capital development project proposal for works within the existing port lands in the northeastern part of the port.

Dublin Port has also recently secured planning approval for the development of the next phase of its inland port near Dublin Airport. The latest stage of the inland port will include a site with the capacity to store more than 2,000 shipping containers and infrastructures such as an ESB substation, an office building and gantry crane.

Dublin Port Company recently submitted a planning application for a €320 million project that aims to provide significant additional capacity at the facility within the port in order to cope with increases in trade up to 2040. The scheme will see a new roll-on/roll-off jetty built to handle ferries of up to 240 metres in length, as well as the redevelopment of an oil berth into a deep-water container berth.

Dublin Port FAQ

Dublin was little more than a monastic settlement until the Norse invasion in the 8th and 9th centuries when they selected the Liffey Estuary as their point of entry to the country as it provided relatively easy access to the central plains of Ireland. Trading with England and Europe followed which required port facilities, so the development of Dublin Port is inextricably linked to the development of Dublin City, so it is fair to say the origins of the Port go back over one thousand years. As a result, the modern organisation Dublin Port has a long and remarkable history, dating back over 300 years from 1707.

The original Port of Dublin was situated upriver, a few miles from its current location near the modern Civic Offices at Wood Quay and close to Christchurch Cathedral. The Port remained close to that area until the new Custom House opened in the 1790s. In medieval times Dublin shipped cattle hides to Britain and the continent, and the returning ships carried wine, pottery and other goods.

510 acres. The modern Dublin Port is located either side of the River Liffey, out to its mouth. On the north side of the river, the central part (205 hectares or 510 acres) of the Port lies at the end of East Wall and North Wall, from Alexandra Quay.

Dublin Port Company is a State-owned commercial company responsible for operating and developing Dublin Port.

Dublin Port Company is a self-financing, and profitable private limited company wholly-owned by the State, whose business is to manage Dublin Port, Ireland's premier Port. Established as a corporate entity in 1997, Dublin Port Company is responsible for the management, control, operation and development of the Port.

Captain William Bligh (of Mutiny of the Bounty fame) was a visitor to Dublin in 1800, and his visit to the capital had a lasting effect on the Port. Bligh's study of the currents in Dublin Bay provided the basis for the construction of the North Wall. This undertaking led to the growth of Bull Island to its present size.

Yes. Dublin Port is the largest freight and passenger port in Ireland. It handles almost 50% of all trade in the Republic of Ireland.

All cargo handling activities being carried out by private sector companies operating in intensely competitive markets within the Port. Dublin Port Company provides world-class facilities, services, accommodation and lands in the harbour for ships, goods and passengers.

Eamonn O'Reilly is the Dublin Port Chief Executive.

Capt. Michael McKenna is the Dublin Port Harbour Master

In 2019, 1,949,229 people came through the Port.

In 2019, there were 158 cruise liner visits.

In 2019, 9.4 million gross tonnes of exports were handled by Dublin Port.

In 2019, there were 7,898 ship arrivals.

In 2019, there was a gross tonnage of 38.1 million.

In 2019, there were 559,506 tourist vehicles.

There were 98,897 lorries in 2019

Boats can navigate the River Liffey into Dublin by using the navigational guidelines. Find the guidelines on this page here.

VHF channel 12. Commercial vessels using Dublin Port or Dun Laoghaire Port typically have a qualified pilot or certified master with proven local knowledge on board. They "listen out" on VHF channel 12 when in Dublin Port's jurisdiction.

A Dublin Bay webcam showing the south of the Bay at Dun Laoghaire and a distant view of Dublin Port Shipping is here
Dublin Port is creating a distributed museum on its lands in Dublin City.
 A Liffey Tolka Project cycle and pedestrian way is the key to link the elements of this distributed museum together.  The distributed museum starts at the Diving Bell and, over the course of 6.3km, will give Dubliners a real sense of the City, the Port and the Bay.  For visitors, it will be a unique eye-opening stroll and vista through and alongside one of Europe’s busiest ports:  Diving Bell along Sir John Rogerson’s Quay over the Samuel Beckett Bridge, past the Scherzer Bridge and down the North Wall Quay campshire to Berth 18 - 1.2 km.   Liffey Tolka Project - Tree-lined pedestrian and cycle route between the River Liffey and the Tolka Estuary - 1.4 km with a 300-metre spur along Alexandra Road to The Pumphouse (to be completed by Q1 2021) and another 200 metres to The Flour Mill.   Tolka Estuary Greenway - Construction of Phase 1 (1.9 km) starts in December 2020 and will be completed by Spring 2022.  Phase 2 (1.3 km) will be delivered within the following five years.  The Pumphouse is a heritage zone being created as part of the Alexandra Basin Redevelopment Project.  The first phase of 1.6 acres will be completed in early 2021 and will include historical port equipment and buildings and a large open space for exhibitions and performances.  It will be expanded in a subsequent phase to incorporate the Victorian Graving Dock No. 1 which will be excavated and revealed. 
 The largest component of the distributed museum will be The Flour Mill.  This involves the redevelopment of the former Odlums Flour Mill on Alexandra Road based on a masterplan completed by Grafton Architects to provide a mix of port operational uses, a National Maritime Archive, two 300 seat performance venues, working and studio spaces for artists and exhibition spaces.   The Flour Mill will be developed in stages over the remaining twenty years of Masterplan 2040 alongside major port infrastructure projects.

Source: Dublin Port Company ©Afloat 2020. 

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