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Displaying items by tag: Waterways Ireland

Waterways Ireland and Dublin City Council have launched a new study that considers the outdoor recreation opportunities of the Grand Canal and its towpaths and land resources in Dublin’s south central area.

The jointly commissioned report by Irish Leisure Consultants, titled The Grand Canal Recreation Activation and Animation: Portobello to Kylemore Road, is informed by the views and knowledge of local communities and stakeholders as well as the ambitions of national and local strategies and plans.

The area in question has limited on-water activity at present, even though it has one of the longest stretches of the canal in the city with no navigation locks.

The Grand Canal and its towpaths represent a significant opportunity to unlock the potential of this inland waterway asset for local communities, Dubliners and visitors to the city.

The consultation process identified positive, strong and diverse connections among residents and communities with this section of the Grand Canal, including recreational uses, environmental stewardship, heritage, and active travel. The report emphasises the importance of balancing of opportunities and responsibilities to increase quality of life and provide for a diverse range of needs and interests.

The report also recommends a collaborative approach, with an initial programme of community-based activities and leadership training to enhance a sense of place and develop perceptions and engagement with the canal, followed by the physical development of a series of links, nodes and zones along the canal.

In spring and summer this year, the project partners say they will work with local stakeholders to pilot a number of on-water activities and explore sustainable initiatives to unlock the potential of the city’s Grand Canal.

Published in Inland Waterways

Waterways Ireland advises users of the Grand Canal Greenway that the greenway section from Digby Bridge to Sallins in Co Kildare will remain closed until the end of February for continued works on restoring the Four Pots overflow structure.

As previously reported on Afloat.ie, the Four Pots is a unique structure located alongside the Grand Canal towpath between the Leinster Aqueduct and Digby Bridge.

Its four circular channels of varying depth helped reduce the water pressure and volume rate before discharge from the canal back to the River Liffey through a series of channels, the cross-border body for Ireland’s inland waterways says.

Published in Inland Waterways

Waterways Ireland advises all masters of vessels and waterways users on the Barrow Navigation that the construction of the Athy Distributor Road bridge is under way and has progressed to the stage where interaction with navigation and trackway users is required.

The new road bridge is being built some 30 metres downstream of the currently disused Wolfhill Railway Bridge in Athy, Co Kildare.

The navigation and trackway will be closed to traffic between the 28th Lock at the Horse Bridge and Ardreigh Lateral Canal to facilitate the lifting and placing of new bridge beams on Monday 23, Tuesday 24 and Wednesday 25 January from 7am to 12pm each day.

In an update, Waterways Ireland confirmed that the navigation and trackway will be closed for a further two mornings on Thursday 26 and Friday 27 January for the same.

Masters of vessels are advised to exercise caution in the vicinity of the works and to follow the instructions of safety personnel in the area.

Further temporary closures and restrictions will be required for bridge deck installation and Wolfhill Railway Bridge refurbishment, details of which will be advised in due course.

Published in Inland Waterways

Following the pre-Christmas warning over an off-station marker on the Shannon Navigation, Waterways Ireland advises that a temporary red marker has now been installed in the relevant area north of Athlone.

The temporary marker is in place of the port-hand lateral marker on the south side of Inchmore Island on Lough Ree.

Masters of Vessels should proceed with additional caution in the vicinity of the island, the cross-border body for Ireland’s inland waterways says.

Published in Inland Waterways

Waterways Ireland advises masters of vessels and waterway users the Shannon Navigation at Lough Ree that a port hand lateral marker on the south side of Inchmore Island is currently off station.

Masters of vessels should proceed with additional caution in the vicinity of Inchmore Island north of Athlone until further notice.

Published in Inland Waterways

Waterways Ireland advises masters of vessels and waterway users on the Erne System of the following in relation to the operation of Portora sluice gates near Enniskillen in Northern Ireland over the Christmas period:

If the sluice gates are in operation on Sunday 25 December, there will be no navigation as the control house for the lock gates will not be manned that day.

If the sluice gates are in operation on Monday 26 and Tuesday 27 December, there will be a reduced operating window. This will be from 8am to 6pm on both days.

Published in Inland Waterways

Waterways Ireland advises users of the Grand Canal in West Dublin that the greenway section from the 8th Lock at Fox and Geese to the 9th Lock in Clondalkin will now be closed from Tuesday 3 January to Friday 10 February.

This closure is to accommodate ESB cabling and services installation works, the cross-border body for Ireland’s inland waterways adds.

No public access is permitted during these works. A temporary traffic management plan with diversions for pedestrians and cyclists will be in place.

Published in Inland Waterways

Waterways Ireland, in partnership with four local authorities, has launched a new winter ‘Make a Connection’ campaign to encourage people to ‘go green and blue’ this festive season and enjoy connecting with the outdoor spaces of the Royal Canal Greenway during the most wonderful time of the year, in a bid to reduce stress and boost overall wellbeing in the winter months.

The campaign has been launched by the cross-border body for Ireland’s inland waterways in partnership with Westmeath County Council, Kildare County Council, Longford County Council and Meath County Council.

A representative from Waterways Ireland said: “Since launching, the Royal Canal Greenway has played an important role in providing a place for people to re-energise and destress.

“We know that from research there is a positive association between encountering green spaces, wildlife, nature, bodies of water such as canals and rivers, and mental wellbeing.

“The 130km canal route has an abundance of trees, plants and wildlife which means it's capacity to improve mental wellbeing is likely to be due to the multiple benefits associated with both green and blue spaces, and indeed the social, community connection with other

“We are encouraging as many people to visit the Royal Canal Greenway as possible this winter in a bid to access this free amazing space, which can play such a vital role in our wellbeing.”

Discover winter’s natural beauty

The Royal Canal Greenway travels from cosmopolitan Maynooth, through Enfield and Mullingar, to charming Cloondara in Longford. A mostly flat trail, the Royal Canal Greenway is steeped in history and was once the domain of placid barge horses, which today has become the realm of walkers, runners and cyclists of all ages and stages.

Indeed, earlier this year it was named European Cycle Route of the Year 2022 by leading Dutch walking and cycling fair Fiets en Wandelbeurs, as previously reported by Afloat.ie.

Many people find that packing a lunch and a ramble along the flat path, passing through picturesque waterside villages is one way to enjoy the Royal Canal Greenway.

It is also home to many welcoming cafes and coffee boxes to stop at for both food and drink, often with outside seating, as well as picnic spots, playgrounds and attractions so you can support local businesses whilst socialising with friends and family.

Enjoy active experiences

While the winter months can make it more difficult to get outside, there are still a wide variety of outdoor activities that can get you moving on the Royal Canal Greenway, for all ages, while staying active.

There are also a number of fitness events scheduled to take place on or near the Royal Canal Greenway in the coming weeks and in the New Year including weekly park runs in the scenic village of Kilcock and in Mullingar. Westmeath will also host the annual Mullingar Half Marathon on St Patrick’s Day.

Stay and unwind

The Royal Canal Greenway is also home to many hotels, guest houses and B&Bs who enjoy the views of both the green and blue spaces. The location of these allows enjoyments of the path at a pace that suits all age-groups and abilities.

As the trail passes through four counties all the way from Ireland’s Ancient East to Ireland's Hidden Heartlands, there are plenty of places to stay overnight at and relax. Many are offering special winter discounts so you can enjoy a festive staycation at an affordable price.

Published in Inland Waterways

Waterways Ireland advises users of the Grand Canal Greenway that the greenway section from Digby Bridge to Sallins in Co Kildare will remain closed until the end of January 2023 for continued works on restoring the Four Pots overflow structure.

As previously reported on Afloat.ie, the Four Pots is a unique structure located alongside the Grand Canal towpath between the Leinster Aqueduct and Digby Bridge.

Its four circular channels of varying depth helped reduce the water pressure and volume rate before discharge from the canal back to the River Liffey through a series of channels, the cross-border body for Ireland’s inland waterways says.

Published in Inland Waterways

Waterways Ireland advises masters and owners of vessels on the Shannon-Erne Waterway that all 16 locks on the inland waterway will be out of service from Friday 23 December to Monday 2 January inclusive.

No lock passage by boat will be possible during this period. Normal service will resume at 9am on Tuesday 3 January.

The service blocks at Aghalane and Haughton’s Shore are closed until Wednesday 15 March. Service blocks at Ballyconnell, Ballinamore, Keshcarrigan and Leitrim shall remain open.

All associated land-based and water-based Blueway trails shall remain open.

Further information is available during normal business hours from Waterways Ireland’s Carrick-on-Shannon office at +44 (0)71 965 0562.

Published in Inland Waterways
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About Dublin Port 

Dublin Port is Ireland’s largest and busiest port with approximately 17,000 vessel movements per year. As well as being the country’s largest port, Dublin Port has the highest rate of growth and, in the seven years to 2019, total cargo volumes grew by 36.1%.

The vision of Dublin Port Company is to have the required capacity to service the needs of its customers and the wider economy safely, efficiently and sustainably. Dublin Port will integrate with the City by enhancing the natural and built environments. The Port is being developed in line with Masterplan 2040.

Dublin Port Company is currently investing about €277 million on its Alexandra Basin Redevelopment (ABR), which is due to be complete by 2021. The redevelopment will improve the port's capacity for large ships by deepening and lengthening 3km of its 7km of berths. The ABR is part of a €1bn capital programme up to 2028, which will also include initial work on the Dublin Port’s MP2 Project - a major capital development project proposal for works within the existing port lands in the northeastern part of the port.

Dublin Port has also recently secured planning approval for the development of the next phase of its inland port near Dublin Airport. The latest stage of the inland port will include a site with the capacity to store more than 2,000 shipping containers and infrastructures such as an ESB substation, an office building and gantry crane.

Dublin Port Company recently submitted a planning application for a €320 million project that aims to provide significant additional capacity at the facility within the port in order to cope with increases in trade up to 2040. The scheme will see a new roll-on/roll-off jetty built to handle ferries of up to 240 metres in length, as well as the redevelopment of an oil berth into a deep-water container berth.

Dublin Port FAQ

Dublin was little more than a monastic settlement until the Norse invasion in the 8th and 9th centuries when they selected the Liffey Estuary as their point of entry to the country as it provided relatively easy access to the central plains of Ireland. Trading with England and Europe followed which required port facilities, so the development of Dublin Port is inextricably linked to the development of Dublin City, so it is fair to say the origins of the Port go back over one thousand years. As a result, the modern organisation Dublin Port has a long and remarkable history, dating back over 300 years from 1707.

The original Port of Dublin was situated upriver, a few miles from its current location near the modern Civic Offices at Wood Quay and close to Christchurch Cathedral. The Port remained close to that area until the new Custom House opened in the 1790s. In medieval times Dublin shipped cattle hides to Britain and the continent, and the returning ships carried wine, pottery and other goods.

510 acres. The modern Dublin Port is located either side of the River Liffey, out to its mouth. On the north side of the river, the central part (205 hectares or 510 acres) of the Port lies at the end of East Wall and North Wall, from Alexandra Quay.

Dublin Port Company is a State-owned commercial company responsible for operating and developing Dublin Port.

Dublin Port Company is a self-financing, and profitable private limited company wholly-owned by the State, whose business is to manage Dublin Port, Ireland's premier Port. Established as a corporate entity in 1997, Dublin Port Company is responsible for the management, control, operation and development of the Port.

Captain William Bligh (of Mutiny of the Bounty fame) was a visitor to Dublin in 1800, and his visit to the capital had a lasting effect on the Port. Bligh's study of the currents in Dublin Bay provided the basis for the construction of the North Wall. This undertaking led to the growth of Bull Island to its present size.

Yes. Dublin Port is the largest freight and passenger port in Ireland. It handles almost 50% of all trade in the Republic of Ireland.

All cargo handling activities being carried out by private sector companies operating in intensely competitive markets within the Port. Dublin Port Company provides world-class facilities, services, accommodation and lands in the harbour for ships, goods and passengers.

Eamonn O'Reilly is the Dublin Port Chief Executive.

Capt. Michael McKenna is the Dublin Port Harbour Master

In 2019, 1,949,229 people came through the Port.

In 2019, there were 158 cruise liner visits.

In 2019, 9.4 million gross tonnes of exports were handled by Dublin Port.

In 2019, there were 7,898 ship arrivals.

In 2019, there was a gross tonnage of 38.1 million.

In 2019, there were 559,506 tourist vehicles.

There were 98,897 lorries in 2019

Boats can navigate the River Liffey into Dublin by using the navigational guidelines. Find the guidelines on this page here.

VHF channel 12. Commercial vessels using Dublin Port or Dun Laoghaire Port typically have a qualified pilot or certified master with proven local knowledge on board. They "listen out" on VHF channel 12 when in Dublin Port's jurisdiction.

A Dublin Bay webcam showing the south of the Bay at Dun Laoghaire and a distant view of Dublin Port Shipping is here
Dublin Port is creating a distributed museum on its lands in Dublin City.
 A Liffey Tolka Project cycle and pedestrian way is the key to link the elements of this distributed museum together.  The distributed museum starts at the Diving Bell and, over the course of 6.3km, will give Dubliners a real sense of the City, the Port and the Bay.  For visitors, it will be a unique eye-opening stroll and vista through and alongside one of Europe’s busiest ports:  Diving Bell along Sir John Rogerson’s Quay over the Samuel Beckett Bridge, past the Scherzer Bridge and down the North Wall Quay campshire to Berth 18 - 1.2 km.   Liffey Tolka Project - Tree-lined pedestrian and cycle route between the River Liffey and the Tolka Estuary - 1.4 km with a 300-metre spur along Alexandra Road to The Pumphouse (to be completed by Q1 2021) and another 200 metres to The Flour Mill.   Tolka Estuary Greenway - Construction of Phase 1 (1.9 km) starts in December 2020 and will be completed by Spring 2022.  Phase 2 (1.3 km) will be delivered within the following five years.  The Pumphouse is a heritage zone being created as part of the Alexandra Basin Redevelopment Project.  The first phase of 1.6 acres will be completed in early 2021 and will include historical port equipment and buildings and a large open space for exhibitions and performances.  It will be expanded in a subsequent phase to incorporate the Victorian Graving Dock No. 1 which will be excavated and revealed. 
 The largest component of the distributed museum will be The Flour Mill.  This involves the redevelopment of the former Odlums Flour Mill on Alexandra Road based on a masterplan completed by Grafton Architects to provide a mix of port operational uses, a National Maritime Archive, two 300 seat performance venues, working and studio spaces for artists and exhibition spaces.   The Flour Mill will be developed in stages over the remaining twenty years of Masterplan 2040 alongside major port infrastructure projects.

Source: Dublin Port Company ©Afloat 2020. 

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