Menu
Allianz and Afloat - Supporting Irish Boating

Ireland's sailing, boating & maritime magazine

Displaying items by tag: j80

After their first overall in the 2021 J/80 Danish Opens which acted as the preliminary for the upcoming Worlds at the same venue, Pat O’Neill of Howth and his crew knew the stakes would be much higher in the big one, as the Royal Danish YC is a J/80 magnet attracting a Worlds fleet in which getting into the top ten would be a major achievement. But they managed that - in fact, they were well clear of ten, finishing overall at sixth. The crew were Pat O’Neill, Shane Hughes, Ryan Glynn and Steve Ryan.

Published in Howth YC
Tagged under

Pat O'Neill with a Howth Yacht Club crew and a local foredeck man has won the Danish J80 Championships at the Kongelig Dansk Yachtklub this afternoon.

The sole lrish competitors in the 23-boat fleet sailing 'Mojo' ended the eight-race series with an eight-point winning margin from Spain's Peru Mugica Elorza. 

O'Neill, sailing with regular crew Ryan Glynn, North Sails sailmaker Shane Hughes and Jakob Nybo on his J80 Mojo are in Denmark for the 2021 World Championships that begins this weekend at the Royal Danish Yacht Club in Copenhagen. 

As regular Afloat readers will know, O'Neill is the reigning Irish champion having taken a 2020 victory at the Royal St. George last September. 

See full results here

Scrub to 1.43 on the timeline to see the dockside interview with Pat in Denmark in the Facebook vid below

Published in Howth YC
Tagged under

Women on the Water J80 crews are back in action in Dun Laoghaire from tomorrow, Tuesday 25 May, the National Yacht Club has announced.

Sailing will be on Tuesday and Thursday evenings and Saturday afternoons, in two series of one week each to prepare for DBSC racing which is planned to run until 25 September.

Interest is high so the NYC encourages anyone who wants to sail to act quickly. Sailing is organised by Women on the Water but is open to all members and new crew are always welcome.

Coaches are on board but some sailing experience is required in order to race. If you’re interested in joining up, text Caitriona O’Brien on 087 232 7748.

In other NYC news, the U25 section will also be a part of this summer’s DBSC programme, not to mention weeknight match racing in Elliot 6s.

The U25s will also be entering J80 teams in the Sovereign’s Cup in Kinsale, Volvo Dun Laoghaire Regatta, ICRA Nationals and Women at the Helm regatta — with coaching and team building opportunities for all skill levels — while the HYC will play host to an inter-club U25 J80 regatta, details to come.

Published in National YC
Tagged under

The National Yacht Club is seeking expressions of interest from all members aged 16 to 25, regardless of class or experience, in the prospect of forming an U25 J80 squad.

The rough plan is for a five-person team (with one or two subs) who will campaign a J80 this summer, pandemic restrictions allowing, with weekly training and racing at the J80 Nationals, ICRAs and Volvo Dun Laoghaire Regatta.

For more details on the team, the selection process and the submission form, see the NYC website HERE.

Published in National YC
Tagged under

Howth's Patrick O' Neill and the crew of Mojo were crowned J80 Irish National Champions at the Royal St. George Yacht Club this afternoon after a closely fought seven-race series on Dublin Bay. 

14 boats competed from four different Dublin clubs that represent a building momentum for the Irish J80 class, one of the world's most popular sportboats.

In a show of strength for Howth Yacht Club entries, four of the top five places were taken by the North Dublin visitors but O'Neill's overall victory was ultimately only by the slender margin of half a point from host club runner up Jonny O'Dowd. In third place overall was 1996 Olympian Dan O'Grady sailing Jammy.

Four race wins on Saturday put O'Neill in a strong position overnight and even two protests in the final racers on Sunday could not stop the Mojo challenge.

1st Mojo IRL 1551 Howth Yacht Club Patrick O' Neill1st Mojo IRL 1551 Howth Yacht Club Patrick O' Neill

2nd JABS IRL 1609 Royal St George Yacht Club Jonny O' Dowd 2nd JABS IRL 1609 Royal St George Yacht Club Jonny O' Dowd 

J80 National Championships 2020 Results at the Royal St. George Yacht Club (Top Five)

1st Mojo IRL 1551 Howth Yacht Club Patrick O' Neill
2nd JABS IRL 1609 Royal St George Yacht Club Jonny O' Dowd 
3rd Jammy IRL 1097 Howth Yacht Club Dan O' Grady
4th Red Cloud 985 Howth Yacht Club Darragh O' Connor 
5th Headcase 1651 HYC, MSC, BYC, LRYC Ryan Glynn 

Full results are here

Published in RStGYC
Tagged under

The J80 UK National Championships was hosted by the Royal Lymington Yacht Club from 24th to 26th August with racing taking place in Christchurch Bay rather than the Western Solent writes Shane Hughes of North Sails Ireland. The tides are more moderate there and the race course is often used for major championships.

The forecast for the 3-day event was very light and the race committee team did a fine job getting 7 out of a planned 9 races sailed. Unfortunately, the final day was very light and with teams looking to pack up and head home, the race committee took the decision to abandon racing for the day.

This year I was racing with Nick & Annie Haigh on ‘Slightly Steamy’. Nick and Annie have campaigned many race boats over the years and its always a pleasure to join them. There was also other Irish interest at the event with Jonny O’Dowd racing ‘Jabs / IRL 1609’. Jonny was joined by Ross McDonald, Patrick Good and Paul Quinn.

Having coached this team in the lead up to the event, it was clear that this talented group would be competitive and it proved to be with them claiming a podium position with a very creditable 3rd place finish in their debut J80 National championship. It will be great to see how this team develops in future events and I’m sure there will be more top results to come. As Jonny put it himself “As this is our first year sailing the J80’s this was a must do event to learn and evaluate our progress over the season. Using the North Sail program we felt we were very much on the pace and hugely look forward to the 2020 season” On ‘Slightly Steamy’ we finished in 2nd overall, just 1 point off the win.

It was a little disappointing for us as we led from the first race up until race 7 but with no racing held on the final day we did not have an opportunity to recapture the lead. Great credit and congratulations to Chris and Hannah Neve and the team on ‘No Regrets’, they had some challenging races but they also showed great speed and poise to grind out the win and were deserving champions.

J80 resultsThe UK J80 scoresheet

All top 4 boats used North Sails, with the winning team using the new 2019 3Di Raw Jib, coded APi-2. We used the 2018 version 3Di Raw Jib, code APi-1. Both sails performed very well in the range of light to medium conditions and gave both teams the speed required to push out in front of the fleet. 6 out 7 races were won by 3Di jibs with Seahorse Editor Andrew Hurst and his team scoring a fine win using the 3Di 360 jib also.

J80 jibAbove and Below - the 2019 edition 3Di Raw Jib (APi-2)

J80 Jib 2

All 3 podium teams used the MR-5 Spinnaker and either the crosscut MAXM1 or Radial cut T-6R mainsails.

J80 mainsailBelow - T6-R Radial Mainsail

So for all J80 teams looking to refresh inventories either for upcoming events or looking ahead to 2020, now is the time to talk to us. North Sails One Design will be offering a -15% discount in the month of September. This is the time to order and get the best deal available.

It is also the best time to talk to us about boat and rig set up and how we can assist your team getting more performance out of your J80. So please get in touch with us to discuss and take a trip to our dedicated J80 web page here

Published in North Sails Ireland
Tagged under

Were it not for a 'DSQ' in race three, Dublin Bay helmsman Jonathan O'Dowd of the Royal St. George Yacht Club may well have been further up the podium when racing was cut short at the J80 UK National Championships in Lymington yesterday. Instead, the Irish boat took bronze in the 11-boat fleet.

As Afloat previously reported, racing in Christchurch Bay at Royal Lymington Yacht Club, in 5 - 8 knots of breeze, the Royal St. George Yacht Club entry 'Jabs' stayed third overall when the final races were abandoned.

Chris & Hannah Neve of the host club were overall winners with Nick Haigh's Slighty Steamy in second. 

Overall results in the 11-boat fleet are downloadable here

Published in RStGYC

After seven races sailed at the UK J80 National Championships Jonathan O'Dowd is six points off the overall lead with two races left to sail today.

Racing in Christchurch Bay at Royal Lymington Yacht Club in 5 - 8 knots of breeze the Royal St. George Yacht Club entry, 'Jabs' is currently third overall. 

Overall results in the 11-boat fleet are downloadable below

Published in RStGYC

This year’s inaugural J/80 Irish National Championships will run back-to-back with Howth Yacht Club's Wave Regatta, Ireland’s largest keelboat sailing regatta this year.

Some convenient scheduling at HYC means that the Irish Championships take place at the North Dublin club during the UK May bank holiday weekend (24-26th) followed by an invitation to the class to take part in Wave Regatta on the following weekend and coinciding with the Irish bank holiday. This will provide competitors with an opportunity to savour the famous hospitality at Howth and to enjoy two weekends in one of the worlds top keelboat racing venues.

Event chairman Ross McDonald explains ‘scheduling the J/80 championships on the weekend of the 25th of May was always going to be a winner. It will allow many of the enthusiastic UK teams to participate and compete with the emerging Irish fleet at at top quality venue. Significantly, we are also offering a combined entry option, to entice teams to stay on for the huge ‘Wave Regatta’ taking place in Howth on June 1-3. With a special launching, lift-out and trailer storage deal, a special concession deal with Irish Ferries together with free berthing for the week as well as a second weekend of racing within what will be a showcase regatta for Ireland (see: waveregatta.com), this will be and unmissable and unforgettable week!’

The Irish J/80 Championships will be run over three days and as part of the ‘Sportsboat Cup’ which incorporates racing for other one-design keelboat divisions, including 1720s and SB20s.

For Wave Regatta, the J/80s have been invited to take part in three days of racing under IRC rating with additional prizes for their own one-design class also. The schedule includes two days of windward/ leeward and round-the-cans races and a coastal race around local islands ‘Lambay’ and ‘Ireland’s Eye’.

The notice of race and online entry to the Irish Championships with discounted option to enter Wave Regatta also can be accessed here.

Published in Howth YC
Tagged under

A group of Royal St. George Yacht Club members have 'joined together' to purchase Irish Sailing's ten-year-old J80 fleet on behalf of the Dun Laoghaire harbour Club.

The Royal St. George Yacht Club was one of several bidders for the eight boat fleet that was originally purchased by the then ISA with a Sports Capital Grant at a cost of circa €240k plus VAT in July 2007.

Writing to members to outline the 'exciting development', Club Commodore Michael Pomeroy says the initiative is to 'meaningfully re-engage with the 25 to 50s and to create a less time consuming more value-driven racing environment for young adults'.

Pomeroy also says it will allow the club, one of the largest in the country, to promote corporate sailing and other activities to further increase Club participation. Pomeroy's full statement is on the club website here.

Published in RStGYC
Page 1 of 3

About Dublin Port 

Dublin Port is Ireland’s largest and busiest port with approximately 17,000 vessel movements per year. As well as being the country’s largest port, Dublin Port has the highest rate of growth and, in the seven years to 2019, total cargo volumes grew by 36.1%.

The vision of Dublin Port Company is to have the required capacity to service the needs of its customers and the wider economy safely, efficiently and sustainably. Dublin Port will integrate with the City by enhancing the natural and built environments. The Port is being developed in line with Masterplan 2040.

Dublin Port Company is currently investing about €277 million on its Alexandra Basin Redevelopment (ABR), which is due to be complete by 2021. The redevelopment will improve the port's capacity for large ships by deepening and lengthening 3km of its 7km of berths. The ABR is part of a €1bn capital programme up to 2028, which will also include initial work on the Dublin Port’s MP2 Project - a major capital development project proposal for works within the existing port lands in the northeastern part of the port.

Dublin Port has also recently secured planning approval for the development of the next phase of its inland port near Dublin Airport. The latest stage of the inland port will include a site with the capacity to store more than 2,000 shipping containers and infrastructures such as an ESB substation, an office building and gantry crane.

Dublin Port Company recently submitted a planning application for a €320 million project that aims to provide significant additional capacity at the facility within the port in order to cope with increases in trade up to 2040. The scheme will see a new roll-on/roll-off jetty built to handle ferries of up to 240 metres in length, as well as the redevelopment of an oil berth into a deep-water container berth.

Dublin Port FAQ

Dublin was little more than a monastic settlement until the Norse invasion in the 8th and 9th centuries when they selected the Liffey Estuary as their point of entry to the country as it provided relatively easy access to the central plains of Ireland. Trading with England and Europe followed which required port facilities, so the development of Dublin Port is inextricably linked to the development of Dublin City, so it is fair to say the origins of the Port go back over one thousand years. As a result, the modern organisation Dublin Port has a long and remarkable history, dating back over 300 years from 1707.

The original Port of Dublin was situated upriver, a few miles from its current location near the modern Civic Offices at Wood Quay and close to Christchurch Cathedral. The Port remained close to that area until the new Custom House opened in the 1790s. In medieval times Dublin shipped cattle hides to Britain and the continent, and the returning ships carried wine, pottery and other goods.

510 acres. The modern Dublin Port is located either side of the River Liffey, out to its mouth. On the north side of the river, the central part (205 hectares or 510 acres) of the Port lies at the end of East Wall and North Wall, from Alexandra Quay.

Dublin Port Company is a State-owned commercial company responsible for operating and developing Dublin Port.

Dublin Port Company is a self-financing, and profitable private limited company wholly-owned by the State, whose business is to manage Dublin Port, Ireland's premier Port. Established as a corporate entity in 1997, Dublin Port Company is responsible for the management, control, operation and development of the Port.

Captain William Bligh (of Mutiny of the Bounty fame) was a visitor to Dublin in 1800, and his visit to the capital had a lasting effect on the Port. Bligh's study of the currents in Dublin Bay provided the basis for the construction of the North Wall. This undertaking led to the growth of Bull Island to its present size.

Yes. Dublin Port is the largest freight and passenger port in Ireland. It handles almost 50% of all trade in the Republic of Ireland.

All cargo handling activities being carried out by private sector companies operating in intensely competitive markets within the Port. Dublin Port Company provides world-class facilities, services, accommodation and lands in the harbour for ships, goods and passengers.

Eamonn O'Reilly is the Dublin Port Chief Executive.

Capt. Michael McKenna is the Dublin Port Harbour Master

In 2019, 1,949,229 people came through the Port.

In 2019, there were 158 cruise liner visits.

In 2019, 9.4 million gross tonnes of exports were handled by Dublin Port.

In 2019, there were 7,898 ship arrivals.

In 2019, there was a gross tonnage of 38.1 million.

In 2019, there were 559,506 tourist vehicles.

There were 98,897 lorries in 2019

Boats can navigate the River Liffey into Dublin by using the navigational guidelines. Find the guidelines on this page here.

VHF channel 12. Commercial vessels using Dublin Port or Dun Laoghaire Port typically have a qualified pilot or certified master with proven local knowledge on board. They "listen out" on VHF channel 12 when in Dublin Port's jurisdiction.

A Dublin Bay webcam showing the south of the Bay at Dun Laoghaire and a distant view of Dublin Port Shipping is here
Dublin Port is creating a distributed museum on its lands in Dublin City.
 A Liffey Tolka Project cycle and pedestrian way is the key to link the elements of this distributed museum together.  The distributed museum starts at the Diving Bell and, over the course of 6.3km, will give Dubliners a real sense of the City, the Port and the Bay.  For visitors, it will be a unique eye-opening stroll and vista through and alongside one of Europe’s busiest ports:  Diving Bell along Sir John Rogerson’s Quay over the Samuel Beckett Bridge, past the Scherzer Bridge and down the North Wall Quay campshire to Berth 18 - 1.2 km.   Liffey Tolka Project - Tree-lined pedestrian and cycle route between the River Liffey and the Tolka Estuary - 1.4 km with a 300-metre spur along Alexandra Road to The Pumphouse (to be completed by Q1 2021) and another 200 metres to The Flour Mill.   Tolka Estuary Greenway - Construction of Phase 1 (1.9 km) starts in December 2020 and will be completed by Spring 2022.  Phase 2 (1.3 km) will be delivered within the following five years.  The Pumphouse is a heritage zone being created as part of the Alexandra Basin Redevelopment Project.  The first phase of 1.6 acres will be completed in early 2021 and will include historical port equipment and buildings and a large open space for exhibitions and performances.  It will be expanded in a subsequent phase to incorporate the Victorian Graving Dock No. 1 which will be excavated and revealed. 
 The largest component of the distributed museum will be The Flour Mill.  This involves the redevelopment of the former Odlums Flour Mill on Alexandra Road based on a masterplan completed by Grafton Architects to provide a mix of port operational uses, a National Maritime Archive, two 300 seat performance venues, working and studio spaces for artists and exhibition spaces.   The Flour Mill will be developed in stages over the remaining twenty years of Masterplan 2040 alongside major port infrastructure projects.

Source: Dublin Port Company ©Afloat 2020. 

Featured Sailing School

INSS sidebutton

Featured Clubs

dbsc mainbutton
Howth Yacht Club
Kinsale Yacht Club
National Yacht Club
Royal Cork Yacht Club
Royal Irish Yacht club
Royal Saint George Yacht Club

Featured Brokers

leinster sidebutton

Featured Associations

ICRA
isora sidebutton

Featured Webcams

Featured Events 2021

vdlr21 sidebutton

Featured Sailmakers

northsails sidebutton
uksails sidebutton
quantum sidebutton
watson sidebutton

Featured Chandleries

CHMarine Afloat logo
osm sidebutton
https://afloat.ie/resources/marine-industry-news/viking-marine

Featured Marinas

dlmarina sidebutton

Featured Blogs

W M Nixon - Sailing on Saturday
podcast sidebutton
mansfield sidebutton
BSB sidebutton
wavelengths sidebutton
 

Please show your support for Afloat by donating