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Displaying items by tag: Dublin Bay

Fresh from their return from last week's Dun Laoghaire to Dingle Race, both Rockabill VI (Paul O'Higgins) and Juggerknot II (Andrew Algeo), both from the Royal Irish Yacht Club, won their respective cruiser divisions in last night's DBSC Thursday night race. 

There was a great turnout of 129 boats across all DBSC classes for racing on a fluky Dublin Bay.

In the J109 division, yet another RIYC yacht, White Mischief (Richard and Tim Goodbody), was the class winner.  

Full results across all classes in the AIB-sponsored Summer Series are below. 

DBSC Results for 17/06/2021


Cruiser 0 IRC: 1. Rockabill VI, 2. Tsunami, 3. D-Tox

Cruiser 0 Echo: 1. D-Tox, 2. Tsunami, 3. Lively Lady

Cruiser 1 IRC: 1. Juggerknot 2, 2. Bon Exemple, 3. White Mischief

Cruiser 1 Echo: 1. Juggerknot 2, 2. Black Velvet, 3. Bon Exemple

Cruiser 1 J109: 1. White Mischief, 2. Chimaera, 3. Dear Prudence

31.7 One Design: 1. After You Too, 2. Attitude, 3. Bluefin Two

31.7 Echo: 1. Kalamar, 2. Fiddly Bits, 3. Bluefin Two

Cruiser 2 IRC: 1. Windjammer, 2. Ruthless, 3. Springer

Cruiser 2 Echo: 1. Gwili II, 2. Boojum, 3. Springer

Cruiser 2 Sigma 33: 1. Gwili II, 2. Boojum, 3. Springer

Cruiser 3 IRC: 1. Maranda, 2. Starlet, 3. Eleint

Cruiser 3 Echo: 1. Maranda, 2. Grasshopper 2, 3. Wynward

Cruiser 4 NS-IRC: 1. Boomerang, 2. RunAway

Cruiser 4 Echo: 1. Boomerang, 2. Antix, 3. RunAway

Cruiser 5A NS-IRC: 1. Playtime, 2. Persistance, 3. The Great Escape,

Cruiser 5A Echo: 1. Witzend, 2. Playtime, 3. Katienua

Cruiser 5B Echo: 1. Sweet Martini, 2. Gung Ho, 3. Fortitudine

SB20: 1. Ted, 2. So Blue, 3. venuesworld.com

Flying 15: 1. Hera, 2. Flyer, 3. Thingamabob

Sportsboat VPRS: 1. Jester, 2. Jitterbug

Sportsboat: 1. Jester, 2. Jitterbug, 3. George 2

Ruffian: 1. Shannagh, 2. Bandit, 3. Ruffles

Shipman: 1. Curraglass, 2. Poppy, 3. Twocan

B211 One Design: 1. Chinook, 2. Isolde, 3. Billy Whizz

B211 Echo: 1. Isolde, 2. Chinook, 3. Billy Whizz

Glen: 1. GlenDun, 2. Glencree, 3. Glencoe

Squib/Mermaid PY: 1=. Lively Lady, 1=. Allsorts, 3. Jill

Published in DBSC
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Tuesday night marks the start of a week-long tribute to long-standing Dublin Bay Sailing Club member Carmel Winkelmann who passed away on Saturday, 12th June. 

DBSC Flag Officers are preparing for a minute's silence on all boats in the fleet before racing commences on each race day this week.

There will be an additional sound signal made five minutes before the first warning signal for the first class each day. The DBSC burgee will be dipped and a minute's silence will be observed in Carmel's honour. 

DBSC Committee Boat MacLir displaying an RIP tribute to the late Carmel Winkelmann prior to Tuesday, June 15th's racingDBSC Committee Boat MacLir (above) and Freebird (below) displaying an RIP tribute to the late Carmel Winkelmann prior to Tuesday, June 15th's racing

Freebird DBSC

As Afloat repeated earlier, Carmel was an active member of DBSC and also gave a huge commitment to Dublin Bay sailing in general.

Due to the Government restrictions, a family funeral will take a place privately at 10 am on Friday (June 18th).

As a mark of respect, the funeral cortège will be passing the yacht clubs along the Dun Laoghaire Harbour waterfront on Friday morning at 9 am.

Funeral notice here

Published in DBSC

Minister for Children, Equality, Disability, Integration and Youth, Roderick O’Gorman helped by Olivia Eaton (age 8) and her sister Sadbh (age 5) have launched the new launch Dublin Bay Biosphere Award on Portmarnock Beach.

The new three-part programme was developed by Scouting Ireland and the Dublin Bay Biosphere Partnership.

Children who successfully complete the programme will earn a badge which can be sewn onto scout uniforms, school bags or clothing in recognition of their efforts to protect local wildlife.

Minister for Children, Equality, Disability, Integration and Youth, Roderick O’Gorman helped by local Portmarnock Scout Rohan Belgan (age 14) on Portmarnock BeachMinister for Children, Equality, Disability, Integration and Youth, Roderick O’Gorman helped by local Portmarnock Scout Rohan Belgan (age 14) on Portmarnock Beach

The Dublin Bay Biosphere covers an area of over 300km2, from Howth to Killiney, with over 300,000 people living within its boundaries.

Biospheres are recognised for their internationally important wildlife, but are also places to be shared by people and nature.

The Dublin Bay Biosphere Award is a call to all young people to ‘get outside, explore, learn, and take action to protect our biosphere’. For details on the Award scheme go here

Published in Dublin Bay
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Dublin Bay Sailing Club Commodore Ann Kirwan rounded off a successful DBSC Race Training Mini-Series yesterday before racing commences after Bank Holiday Monday from next Tuesday, June 8th.

The well-attended series, running since May 16th - in line with COVID guidelines -  presented a great opportunity for boats and crews and race personnel to prepare for the summer racing season as lockdown eases. 

Next week the AIB DBSC Racing season begins in earnest where the country's biggest yacht racing club welcomes back training participants along with the rest of the membership to the following schedule.

DBSC Weekly Racing Programme

  • Tuesdays: Keelboats – From Committee Vessel
  • Tuesdays: Dinghies – Harbour sailing
  • Wednesdays: Water Wags – Harbour sailing
  • Thursdays: Keelboats – Committee Boat starts
  • Saturdays: Keelboats – Committee Boat starts
  • Saturdays: Dinghies – Harbour sailing

Meanwhile, the last week of the training series ran as follows: 

Tuesday dinghies - RO Barbara Conway aboard DBSC committee vessel Freebird ran one training race in light winds inside the harbour. 9 PYs and 22 Lasers over 2 starts.

Wednesday Water Wags - RO Harry Gallagher aboard DBSC committee vessel MacLir ran 2 training races in light winds inside the harbour for a full complement of training Wags.

Two Water Wag training races in light winds were held inside the harbourTwo Water Wag training races in light winds were held inside the harbour

Thursday keelboats - RO Jack Roy aboard committee vessel Freebird headed outside the harbour to survey the conditions and reported gusts of over 30 knots and a big swell in a strong southerly wind. Jack (Red Fleet) and Barry MacNeaney (Blue Fleet) decided to cancel race training for all classes.

Saturday saw the last day of DBSC’s Race Training mini-series.

RO Barry MacNeaney aboard MacLir ran race training for the Blue Fleet of 36 boats with Cr 0 - 2, Cr1 - 7, B31.7s - 7, Cr2 - 3, Cr3 - 7, Cr 4&5 - 7, Shipman - 3, Glen - 0.

RO Barry O’Neill aboard Freebird ran 2 training races for the 34 Green Fleet boats with SB20s - 5, FFs - 13, Sportsboats & Dragons - 3, Ruffian - 5, B211 - 7, Squibs & Mermaids - 1.

RO Suzanne McGarry aboard committee vessel Spirit of the Irish ran race training for the Dinghies (2 races) with 19 boats - PYs - 5, Lasers 14 over 2 starts.

Published in DBSC
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After a long break due to COVID, recreational diving is back on Dublin Bay and divers were out over the past two weekends at Dalkey Island and other popular bay sites.

A class of open water students got back into the water after a long break for a snorkel.

Local boat bives are also now fully operational in Dublin Bay again with regular departures to favourite dive sites around Scotmans Bay, Dalkey Island and the Muglins Beacon.

The Ocean Divers 'Ocean Enterprise' RIB takes divers out into Dublin Bay from Dun LaoghaireThe Ocean Divers 'Ocean Enterprise' RIB takes divers out into Dublin Bay from Dun Laoghaire

Ocean divers, a dive firm that operates from Dun Laoghaire Harbour, says on social media, it is now running snorkel and boat trips over the next couple of weeks as the 2021 season reopens.

Published in Diving
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The many months of Lockdown in its various forms have prevented the Dublin Bay Old Gaffers Association from physically holding their regular monthly winter meetings at Poolbeg Yacht & Boat Club in Dublin Port. Each of these friendly gatherings – with specialist speakers on a wide variety of maritime topics - traditionally raised substantial sums for Howth Lifeboat through the simple and relatively painless expedient of the attendees on arrival dropping a minimum of €5 into an RNLI yellow welly on a table by the door.

The pandemic shutdowns might have stopped this intensely personal programme in any form, were some ordinary body involved. But the DBOGSA are made of sterner stuff. And as we've commented before on Afloat.ie, the more die-hard of a traditionalist any sailing enthusiast might be, the more he or she seems to be comfortably on top of modern communications.

Thus with tech whizzes like Mark Sweetnam and the current DBOGA Hon Sec/Treas Darryl Hughes on the job, the DBOGA smoothly transformed its monthly winter gatherings into an eclectic series of online Zoom talk/discussions – many of them previewed in Afloat.ie - which continued the lifeboat fund-raising as part of the online process, and provided the bonus of an edited version of the monthly show appearing on YouTube, usually within 24 hours.

A long-established and friendly relationship: the Howth 17s come to visit the Old Gaffers Association during their Golden Jubilee Celebrations at the Poolbeg Y & BC in 2013. Photo: W M Nixon   A long-established and friendly relationship: the Howth 17s come to visit the Old Gaffers Association during their Golden Jubilee Celebrations at the Poolbeg Y & BC in 2013. Photo: W M Nixon

Now that the light of lockdown-lifting is on the horizon, it is time to take stock, and Johnny Wedick, President of the DBOGA, has received an appreciative letter from Rose Michael, leader of the Howth RNLI Fund Raising Crew, with the news that the DBOGA "Lockdown Lolly" has reached €7,571, and there's probably more in the pipeline.

As it is, it's a tidy sum. So when the DBOGA hold their annual Cruise-in-Company to Howth in August - by which time it's hoped proper freedom of movement will have arrived – there'll be one of those slightly wacky ceremonies where the Old Gaffers hand the Howth RNLI an enormous cardboard cheque with the final amount inscribed thereon. Upon which, everyone will doubtless then spring to the mainbrace, and great will be the splicing thereof.

Dublin Bay Old Gaffers raise €7,571 online for Howth Lifebo
Published in Dublin Bay Old Gaffers

DBSC Thursday night training is cancelled for all fleets this evening on Dublin Bay due to current weather conditions and the forecast for further strong southerly winds.

Three training fleets were in operation as over 90 boats from the Dun Laoghaire Harbour waterfront clubs turned out for the first training session last Saturday, as Afloat reported here.

DBSC is running the mini-series this month in order for crews and DBSC race management teams to train and to get ready for the racing season on June 7 as sailing is now considered a safe, non-contact sport with no material difference between training and competition re COVID-19.

Published in DBSC
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"Brilliant to be back!" was the verdict from Dublin Bay Sailing Club sailors who returned to the water yesterday as part of a training minmi series, the first DBSC  on the water event since the cancellation of its Turkey Shoot Series last November.

Three training fleets were in operation as over 90 boats from the Dun Laoghaire Harbour waterfront clubs and marina headed out onto the bay yesterday afternoon in a light to medium easterly breeze.

DBSC is running the mini-series this month in order for crews and DBSC race management teams to train and to get ready for the racing season as sailing is now considered a safe, non-contact sport with no material difference between training and competition.

DBSC Committee Vessel MacLirDBSC Committee Vessel MacLir

DBSC Commodore Ann Kirwan and Eddie Totterdell (as DBSC PRO) held a briefing for the ROs and volunteers to outline the training guidelines as well as the Covid protocols before the fleet left the marina.

On the water, Race Officer Suzanne McGarry was in charge of DBSC dinghies inside the harbour with approximately 30 boats over three starts comprising mainly of Lasers that are again reporting big numbers this season.

The series is running on the regular DBSC Race nights of Tuesdays, Wednesdays, Thursday and Saturdays at Dun Laoghaire Harbour.

Race Officer Eddie Totterdell was aboard Committee Vessel MacLir on DBSC's Blue/Red Fleet course. Totterdell ran boats six starts for approximately 31 boats with Cr1x7, Cr2x6, Cr3x3, Cr4 & 5 x 7, 31.7s x 5 and Shipmans x3.

No results for the training races are being published in line with DBSC's training series regulations.

RO Barry O’Neill on board Committee Vessel Freebird for the DBSC Green fleet with approx 30 boats over five starts and two training sessions for SB20s, FFs x 14, Mixed Sportsboats & Dragons, Ruffians x6, and B211s x9.

Overall, the club is reporting good feedback from the first day afloat from both sailors and volunteers. The training series coinciding with the publication of the club's 2021 yearbook now online.

Larry Martin tribute

There was a tribute to Larry Martin by the Green Fleet Team Lead by Therese Tyrrell and RO Barry O’Neill aboard Freebird before leaving the marina. Larry, who died in April, was on the Green fleet Race Management team for the last race of last season.

Published in DBSC
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The standby safety vessel the Arctic Ocean that is undertaking a series of geophysical surveys for the Codling Wind Park was back in Dun Laoghaire Harbour this Saturday morning. 

The red hulled Danish flagged vessel is operating on a 24-hour basis between 14 April to 26 May undertaking geophysical operations to 'characterise the export cable sites' for the new east coast wind farm. 

The 45-year-old ship was accompanied this morning at Dun Laoghaire Harbour by a Dublin Port Pilot boat.  She is working in tandem with other work boats Fastnet Pelican based out of the marina and Jackup Jill.

During its work, Arctic Ocean will be towing survey equipment, and requires large turning circles and will be restricted in its ability to manoeuvre.

All vessels operating within this area are requested to keep their distance, maintaining at least the 500m safety zone around the survey vessel, and pass at minimum speed to reduce vessel wash.

More details about the operation are contained in the Department of Transport Marine Notice 21 of 2021 available here

The Séan O’Casey Community Centre in Dublin’s East Wall officially opened its new garden for seniors to the public this week, featuring a new marquee and planting sponsored by Dublin Port Company. Under current Covid-19 restrictions, the redesigned garden will be able to accommodate up to 15 seniors per day for activities such as bingo, knitting, pool, snooker, draughts, wellness talks and live music and dancing.

The Centre, which first opened in 2009, is an important resource to the people of East Wall and prior to the pandemic, offered a Senior Citizen Daycare service, providing four-course meals for 85 seniors, with mental wellbeing and physical activities for up to 100 seniors, five days a week. Throughout Covid-19 it has continued to provide a Meals on Wheels service for East Wall’s senior citizens, but opportunities for older members of the community to come together and socialise have been severely curtailed. It is hoped the garden will offer a safe space for familiar faces to be reacquainted this summer.

Commenting on the opening of the Garden, the Centre’s Chairperson Willie Dwyer said; “The older people in the community of East Wall are very special and have sacrificed so much in the last year. When Covid happened, we put our heads together to see what we could do for them and we came up with this garden. It is important to give them a safe space to get out of the house a few times a week. We have not seen a lot of our senior community in the last year and we want to encourage as many of them as possible to come back. We want to get the word out to older people in our community that the Centre is open again, and that everyone is welcome.

“It has been a tough year but occasions like this give us optimism for the future. We are all looking forward to getting back to offering a full range of services to the community of East Wall again. None of this would have been possible without our sponsors who have worked tremendously well together to get this garden up and running for our senior citizens, so I would like to thank Dublin Port Company, Collen Construction, the Inner-City Trust Fund and Dublin City Council for making this happen.”

Dublin Port Company has had a long-standing relationship with the Centre and the Port’s Heritage Director, Lar Joye, and Edel Currie, Community Engagement Manager, were in attendance to cut the ribbon as the garden welcomed its first visitors.

Lar Joye said; “Dublin Port Company is delighted to be involved in creating a dedicated garden for older citizens in our community as part of our long-running commitment to the Seán O’Casey Community Centre and the people of East Wall. We hope that this new facility provides an outlet for seniors who have been isolated for the last year to come and socialise with each other again. It’s a hub for conversation, story-telling, activity and entertainment that we hope older people will enjoy for many more years to come.

“Well done to Willie and all the staff at the Séan O’Casey Community Centre who have driven this project from an idea through to completion. We all look forward to seeing it used to its full potential when the circumstances allow.”

Published in Dublin Port
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Dun Laoghaire Harbour Information

Dun Laoghaire Harbour is the second port for Dublin and is located on the south shore of Dublin Bay. Marine uses for this 200-year-old man-made harbour have changed over its lifetime. Originally built as a port of refuge for sailing ships entering the narrow channel at Dublin Port, the harbour has had a continuous ferry link with Wales and this was the principal activity of the harbour until the service stopped in 2015. In all this time, however, one thing has remained constant and that is the popularity for sailing and boating from the port, making it Ireland's marine leisure capital with a harbour fleet of over 1,200-1.600 pleasure craft.

Dun Laoghaire Harbour Bye-Laws

Download the bye-laws on this link here

FAQs

A live stream Dublin Bay webcam showing Dun Laoghaire Harbour entrance and East Pier is here

Dun Laoghaire is a Dublin suburb situated on the south side of Dublin Bay, approximately, 15km from Dublin city centre.

The east and west piers of the harbour are each of 1 kilometre (0.62 miles) long.

The harbour entrance is 232 metres (761 ft) across from East to West Pier.

  • Public Boatyard
  • Public slipway
  • Public Marina

23 clubs, 14 activity providers and eight state-related organisations operate from Dun Laoghaire Harbour that facilitates a full range of sports - Sailing, Rowing, Diving, Windsurfing, Angling, Canoeing, Swimming, Triathlon, Powerboating, Kayaking and Paddleboarding. Participants include members of the public, club members, tourists, disabled, disadvantaged, event competitors, schools, youth groups and college students.

  • Commissioners of Irish Lights
  • Dun Laoghaire Marina
  • MGM Boats & Boatyard
  • Coastguard
  • Naval Service Reserve
  • Royal National Lifeboat Institution
  • Marine Activity Centre
  • Rowing clubs
  • Yachting and Sailing Clubs
  • Sailing Schools
  • Irish Olympic Sailing Team
  • Chandlery & Boat Supply Stores

The east and west granite-built piers of Dun Laoghaire harbour are each of one kilometre (0.62 mi) long and enclose an area of 250 acres (1.0 km2) with the harbour entrance being 232 metres (761 ft) in width.

In 2018, the ownership of the great granite was transferred in its entirety to Dun Laoghaire Rathdown County Council who now operate and manage the harbour. Prior to that, the harbour was operated by The Dun Laoghaire Harbour Company, a state company, dissolved in 2018 under the Ports Act.

  • 1817 - Construction of the East Pier to a design by John Rennie began in 1817 with Earl Whitworth Lord Lieutenant of Ireland laying the first stone.
  • 1820 - Rennie had concerns a single pier would be subject to silting, and by 1820 gained support for the construction of the West pier to begin shortly afterwards. When King George IV left Ireland from the harbour in 1820, Dunleary was renamed Kingstown, a name that was to remain in use for nearly 100 years. The harbour was named the Royal Harbour of George the Fourth which seems not to have remained for so long.
  • 1824 - saw over 3,000 boats shelter in the partially completed harbour, but it also saw the beginning of operations off the North Wall which alleviated many of the issues ships were having accessing Dublin Port.
  • 1826 - Kingstown harbour gained the important mail packet service which at the time was under the stewardship of the Admiralty with a wharf completed on the East Pier in the following year. The service was transferred from Howth whose harbour had suffered from silting and the need for frequent dredging.
  • 1831 - Royal Irish Yacht Club founded
  • 1837 - saw the creation of Victoria Wharf, since renamed St. Michael's Wharf with the D&KR extended and a new terminus created convenient to the wharf.[8] The extended line had cut a chord across the old harbour with the landward pool so created later filled in.
  • 1838 - Royal St George Yacht Club founded
  • 1842 - By this time the largest man-made harbour in Western Europe had been completed with the construction of the East Pier lighthouse.
  • 1855 - The harbour was further enhanced by the completion of Traders Wharf in 1855 and Carlisle Pier in 1856. The mid-1850s also saw the completion of the West Pier lighthouse. The railway was connected to Bray in 1856
  • 1871 - National Yacht Club founded
  • 1884 - Dublin Bay Sailing Club founded
  • 1918 - The Mailboat, “The RMS Leinster” sailed out of Dún Laoghaire with 685 people on board. 22 were post office workers sorting the mail; 70 were crew and the vast majority of the passengers were soldiers returning to the battlefields of World War I. The ship was torpedoed by a German U-boat near the Kish lighthouse killing many of those onboard.
  • 1920 - Kingstown reverted to the name Dún Laoghaire in 1920 and in 1924 the harbour was officially renamed "Dun Laoghaire Harbour"
  • 1944 - a diaphone fog signal was installed at the East Pier
  • 1965 - Dun Laoghaire Motor Yacht Club founded
  • 1968 - The East Pier lighthouse station switched from vapourised paraffin to electricity, and became unmanned. The new candle-power was 226,000
  • 1977- A flying boat landed in Dun Laoghaire Harbour, one of the most unusual visitors
  • 1978 - Irish National Sailing School founded
  • 1934 - saw the Dublin and Kingstown Railway begin operations from their terminus at Westland Row to a terminus at the West Pier which began at the old harbour
  • 2001 - Dun Laoghaire Marina opens with 500 berths
  • 2015 - Ferry services cease bringing to an end a 200-year continuous link with Wales.
  • 2017- Bicentenary celebrations and time capsule laid.
  • 2018 - Dun Laoghaire Harbour Company dissolved, the harbour is transferred into the hands of Dun Laoghaire Rathdown County Council

From East pier to West Pier the waterfront clubs are:

  • National Yacht Club. Read latest NYC news here
  • Royal St. George Yacht Club. Read latest RSTGYC news here
  • Royal Irish Yacht Club. Read latest RIYC news here
  • Dun Laoghaire Motor Yacht Club. Read latest DMYC news here

 

The umbrella organisation that organises weekly racing in summer and winter on Dublin Bay for all the yacht clubs is Dublin Bay Sailing Club. It has no clubhouse of its own but operates through the clubs with two x Committee vessels and a starters hut on the West Pier. Read the latest DBSC news here.

The sailing community is a key stakeholder in Dún Laoghaire. The clubs attract many visitors from home and abroad and attract major international sailing events to the harbour.

 

Dun Laoghaire Regatta

Dun Laoghaire's biennial town regatta was started in 2005 as a joint cooperation by the town's major yacht clubs. It was an immediate success and is now in its eighth edition and has become Ireland's biggest sailing event. The combined club's regatta is held in the first week of July.

  • Attracts 500 boats and more from overseas and around the country
  • Four-day championship involving 2,500 sailors with supporting family and friends
  • Economic study carried out by the Irish Marine Federation estimated the economic value of the 2009 Regatta at €2.5 million

The dates for the 2021 edition of Ireland's biggest sailing event on Dublin Bay is: 8-11 July 2021. More details here

Dun Laoghaire-Dingle Offshore Race

The biennial Dun Laoghaire to Dingle race is a 320-miles race down the East coast of Ireland, across the south coast and into Dingle harbour in County Kerry. The latest news on the Dun Laoghaire to Dingle Race can be found by clicking on the link here. The race is organised by the National Yacht Club.

The 2021 Race will start from the National Yacht Club on Wednesday 9th, June 2021.

Round Ireland Yacht Race

This is a Wicklow Sailing Club race but in 2013 the Garden County Club made an arrangement that sees see entries berthed at the RIYC in Dun Laoghaire Harbour for scrutineering prior to the biennial 704–mile race start off Wicklow harbour. Larger boats have been unable to berth in the confines of Wicklow harbour, a factor WSC believes has restricted the growth of the Round Ireland fleet. 'It means we can now encourage larger boats that have shown an interest in competing but we have been unable to cater for in Wicklow' harbour, WSC Commodore Peter Shearer told Afloat.ie here. The race also holds a pre-ace launch party at the Royal Irish Yacht Club.

Laser Masters World Championship 2018

  • 301 boats from 25 nations

Laser Radial World Championship 2016

  • 436 competitors from 48 nations

ISAF Youth Worlds 2012

  • The Youth Olympics of Sailing run on behalf of World Sailing in 2012.
  • Two-week event attracting 61 nations, 255 boats, 450 volunteers.
  • Generated 9,000 bed nights and valued at €9 million to the local economy.

The Harbour Police are authorised by the company to police the harbour and to enforce and implement bye-laws within the harbour, and all regulations made by the company in relation to the harbour.

There are four ship/ferry berths in Dun Laoghaire:

  • No 1 berth (East Pier)
  • No 2 berth (east side of Carlisle Pier)
  • No 3 berth (west side of Carlisle Pier)
  • No 4 berth  (St, Michaels Wharf)

Berthing facilities for smaller craft exist in the town's 800-berth marina and on swinging moorings.

© Afloat 2020

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