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Displaying items by tag: Dun Laoghaire Harbour

The actor Niamh Cusack temporarily enlisted with the Naval Service to give a professional reading of a significant poem on board the L.É.James Joyce while alongside Dun Laoghaire Harbour.

Her nuanced, balanced and knowing delivery of the work, recorded by the Defence Forces Audio Visual Section, can be viewed below.

For this phase of the Naval Service’s 75th Anniversary year, a poem submitted by a serving member of the Navy was selected by Naval Headquarters to mark the occasion.

The poem is entitled ‘Statio Bene Fida Carinis’ (Latin for ‘A Place Most Suitable For Ships’). It envisages the Navy’s fleet circumnavigating Ireland from its Base in Cork Harbour, touching on Irish maritime historical and mythological events en route.

The poem makes the point that Ireland’s maritime tradition spans the centuries.

More from the Dublin Gazette here.

Published in Navy

The RNLI has awarded volunteer lifeboat crewmember Rory Bolton with a medal recognising his twenty years’ service to the charity at Dun Laoghaire Harbour. Over the course of two decades, Rory has been a volunteer crew member on both the inshore and all-weather lifeboats based at Dun Laoghaire lifeboat station and been passed out as a mechanic for both lifeboats.

Rory was presented with his medal recently by Dun Laoghaire RNLI Lifeboat Operations Manager Edward Totterdell and RNLI Area Lifesaving Manager Peter Harty. Joining the RNLI back in 2001, Rory came on board after a friend who was already on the lifeboat crew, invited him to come to the station and see if he’d like to join. Already an outboard engine mechanic, Rory had seen the lifeboat in the harbour but didn’t know how to join the lifeboat crew. He was welcomed with opened arms and started his lifeboat journey on the smaller inshore lifeboat before moving onto the All-Weather lifeboat as well. He became a Helm and then the Senior Helm on the inshore lifeboat and has since passed out as a mechanic on both lifeboats and is currently third mechanic on the All-Weather lifeboat. On the personal life front, Rory also met his wife, Dr. Sarah Brookes, through the lifeboat, as she volunteers as the station’s medical advisor.

Commenting on the honour Rory said, ‘Dun Laoghaire RNLI is an amazing team to be a part of and the last twenty years have flown. We all come from different backgrounds but when we are out on a callout, we work as a team and there is nothing like it. Being a volunteer with the RNLI has been a huge part of my life, I met my wife Sarah through it, and we now have two beautiful children, Alice (7) and James (3). Alice already wants to join the lifeboat when she’s old enough. It’s been a wonderful twenty years.’

Reflecting on his most memorable callout Rory remembers a New Year’s Day callout around eight years ago to a kitesurfer who had lost the kite and was left in the water. ‘Conditions on the day were very challenging and right on the edge of what the inshore lifeboat can launch in. We went to Sandymount and there was no way he was able to get in to the shore by himself. With waves breaking over the lifeboat and the casualty struggling in the water, we pulled him to safety in the most difficult conditions. I’ll never forget it.’

Dun Laoghaire RNLI Lifeboat Operations Manager Edward Totterdell added his congratulations to Rory, ‘This recognition, by the RNLI, of twenty years of dedicated service and volunteering by Rory, is one he thoroughly deserves. Those two decades have seen countless rescues and launches and he has helped so many people, along with his colleagues on the crew. Our grateful thanks to Rory for all his tireless work and for his continued service to the lifeboat crew and hopefully we will have a few more years yet.’

RNLI Area Lifesaving Manager Peter Harty presented Rory with his medal on behalf of the RNLI. Peter said, ‘It’s an honour to work with a group of incredible men and women who give so much to their community. In being part of a lifeboat crew, they carry a pager day and night, ready to launch at a moment’s notice when people get into trouble on the water. Twenty years’ service is an incredible record. My thanks to Rory and also to his family, who support him and help our lifeboat crews saves lives at sea.’

Published in RNLI Lifeboats

The Dun Laoghaire Coast Guard team was tasked to assist National Ambulance Service (NAS) with a casualty on a yacht at Dun Laoghaire Harbour on St Stephen's Day.

The RNLI Dun Laoghaire Lifeboat and Dublin Fire Brigade also attended. The casualty was treated on scene by the inshore lifeboat crew and staff at the town marina until paramedics arrived.

The casualty was then stretchered to an awaiting ambulance.

While packing up after the incident, a member of the public alerted the Coast Guard to someone who had fallen on the road near the marina. An ambulance was already called for by other members of the public but the Coast Guard team provided initial first aid treatment and care until they arrived. 

The annual Dun Laoghaire RNLI Christmas Eve ceremony was held this afternoon to honour the memory of 15 lifeboat volunteers who died on service 126 years ago. This year’s ceremony also marked the 200th anniversary of the death of four crew members who died on a call-out at Christmas time in 1821.

The short service at the end of the East Pier commemorated all lives lost around our coasts and on inland waters in 2021.

Dun Laoghaire RNLI’s volunteer crew traditionally hold this annual ceremony at the East Pier lighthouse as part of a long-standing local custom to acknowledge the sacrifice of their colleagues in carrying out their duty.

Wreaths were placed by the lifeboat crew at sea off the East Pier in memory of all lives lost at seaWreaths were placed by the lifeboat crew at sea off the East Pier Photo: Conrad Jones

The lifeboat service on Dublin Bay is one of the oldest in the world, dating back to 1803 and a lifeboat was based at nearby Sandycove as one of several local stations.

During a service to the brig Ellen in an easterly gale on 28 December 1821, the lifeboat with 14 crew members onboard, was swamped and the crew were washed out of the lifeboat with four people losing their lives; Hugh Byrne, Thomas Fitzsimons, John Archbold and Thomas Grimes.

On Christmas Eve in 1895, the number two lifeboat was capsized in gale force winds while proceeding to the assistance of the SS Palme of Finland that had run aground off Blackrock. All 15 crew members onboard, drowned.

During today’s ceremony, wreaths were placed by the lifeboat crew at sea off the East Pier in memory of all lives lost at sea.

The Covid-19 compliant ceremony beside the lighthouse, featured musician William Byrne performing The Ballad of the Palme and Sports broadcaster Des Cahill who reading a newspaper account of the disaster, which was published at the time. An ecumenical blessing was given by Reverends Bruce Hayes and Fr. Padraig Gleeson before a lament was played by piper Paul McNally.

There was a joint guard of honour provided by representatives from the Dun Laoghaire Coast Guard Unit and Civil Defence.

As the ceremony came to a close, Dun Laoghaire RNLI’s inshore lifeboat was called out to rescue a dog that had fallen from the West Pier at Coal Harbour. They immediately raced to the scene, retrieving the dog from the water and reuniting it with the owner, before returning back to station and standing down.

The names of the 15 volunteer crew members who died in 1895 were John Baker, John Bartley, Edward Crowe, Thomas Dunphy, William Dunphy, Francis McDonald, Edward Murphy, Patrick Power, James Ryan, Francis Saunders, George Saunders, Edward Shannon, Henry Underhill, Alexander Williams and Henry Williams.

The lifeboat capsized when about 600 yards from the distressed vessel and, although every effort was made to render help to the lifeboat and to the SS Palme, nothing could be done.

The number one lifeboat also put out with only a crew of nine and obtained six further volunteers from HMS Melampus. She also capsized under sail but fortunately, all regained the lifeboat.

Published in RNLI Lifeboats

DMYC has launched a dinghy racing “Christmas Cracker” event for Dun Laoghaire Harbour on December 27th. 

Supported by Viking Marine and with the kind permission of the Harbour Master, the fixture will see a mass start PY race on Monday, 27th December @ 1.00, doing port rounding circuits of the Harbour, for all those looking to burn off the excesses of the Christmas Dinner, according to DMYC race organiser Neil Colin.

"This is a novelty Charity race in aid to the RNLI, with the aim of creating a spectacle for all those strollers on the piers", Colin told Afloat.

The course as above will feature marks in the extreme corners of the harbour and should provide a welcome break from regular format races, enabled by the lack of moored vessels in the harbour and the generally lower levels of waterborne activity in the harbour.

Entries will be capped at 90, with the expectation of higher participation than the regular Frostbite race days.

This is an “Open” event. While the main waterfront clubhouses will be closed, regular sailors will be able to access the dinghy parks, on a “sail and dash” basis.

DMYC are hoping to have a “Socially Distanced” prize giving in front of the DMYC approximately an hour after racing concludes.

Entries @ €5 per entry to cover costs and a donation to RNLI can be found here

DMYC wishes all sailors a happy and safe Christmas and we look forward to a nice day for winter sailing on Monday 27th.

Published in DMYC

With over 1,500 volunteers around Ireland, each RNLI crew member signs up to save every one from drowning – the charity’s mission since 1824. This Christmas Dun Laoghaire RNLI has a number of new volunteer lifeboat crew who are currently undergoing training to be able to save those in trouble at sea and who will form part of the team of lifesavers at the south Dublin lifeboat station. Corkman Aidan Sliney and Ballinteer native Ailbhe Smith are no strangers to the sea and are among a host of recent recruits to join lifeboat crews in Ireland during the pandemic. The two new volunteer lifeboat crew are asking the public to support the RNLI this Christmas.

While new to Dun Laoghaire RNLI, Aidan Sliney is no stranger to the world of lifeboating. In Ballycotton the name Sliney is famous in lifeboat circles as his great grandfather and grandfather were involved in one of the most famous rescues in the history of the RNLI, the Daunt Rock rescue in February 1936. Aidan’s father was also on the lifeboat for many years and his brother, well known comic book artist Will Sliney, is on the Ballycotton lifeboat crew today. Work took Aidan abroad to Stockholm and Manhattan for a few years and he recently moved back to Dublin with his wife and their young child. In joining Dun Laoghaire RNLI, Aidan has gone back to basic training to refresh his skills on the lifeboat and is currently training on the station’s D-class lifeboat.

Commenting on his decision to join the lifeboat crew in Dun Laoghaire Aidan said, ‘I’m delighted that I am able to put my lifeboating experience to good use in Dublin and be a volunteer with Dun Laoghaire RNLI. We have the same All-Weather lifeboat in Ballycotton but now I’m getting to grips with the station’s inshore lifeboat, which carries out a lot of the close to shore rescues. This is a busy lifeboat station with an amazing crew and I’m learning new skills and working with a new team but it’s the same wherever you go in the RNLI.

‘Everyone is passionate about what they do and wants to help people in trouble on the water. The training is outstanding and I’m happily starting at the beginning and getting familiar with it again, you can’t take anything for granted. We’ve had a couple of new starters at the station, and we are helping each other through the training. We all have different backgrounds which means we are also learning from each other. The current lifeboat crew have been hugely generous with their time helping us skill up.’

Ailbhe Smith was raised in Ballinteer but moved to Dun Laoghaire during the pandemic. A hugely experienced Mermaid Sailor, Ailbhe competitively raced the traditional wooden ‘Mermaid’ boats for years. Some years ago, when she was in Sligo, she witnessed the local lifeboat crew rescue a diver and once she moved to Dun Laoghaire, Ailbhe messaged the lifeboat station about the possibility of volunteering and was welcomed aboard.

Adding her support to the RNLI Christmas Appeal Ailbhe commented, ‘When I saw the RNLI rescue a diver at Rosses Point in Sligo some years ago, I knew I’d love to do that, and I sort of filed it away for later. You have to live near the lifeboat station to be able to make a ‘shout’ and then a few years later I found myself living in Dun Laoghaire and it seemed like fate. I love the sea and my years sailing have given me a healthy respect for the power of it. It has been a little bit surreal to join up during a time of restrictions but that hasn’t stopped us as there is a lot to learn. We are always looking to get out on the lifeboat and train and with Dun Laoghaire being such a busy lifeboat station, I’m eager to put my training into practice and to help people.’

‘When the pager goes, no lifeboat volunteer hesitates to answer the call, and these rescues would not be possible without the donations from the RNLI's generous supporters, helping to fund the essential kit, training equipment needed by Lifeboat crews all year round. Thank you to everyone who supports the appeal this Christmas.’

To make a donation to the RNLI’s Christmas Appeal visit: RNLI.org/Xmas

Published in RNLI Lifeboats

From Thursday onwards the forecast for the penultimate round of the Viking Marine sponsored Frostbites, hosted by Dun Laoghaire Motor Yacht Club, showed winds of the order of fifteen knots with gusts in the high twenties. With a projected wind direction from the south, the harbour would still be relatively sheltered, but the high twenties gusts gave cause for concern. A change of Race Officer for the day’s proceedings, meant that this correspondent wasn’t on the water but watched the first race from the western breakwater inside the harbour.

A PY Start Photo: Ian CutliffeA PY Start Photo: Ian Cutliffe

A balmy 12°, according to the car thermometer, greeted the competitors but there was no evident sign of the promised 15 knots. Indeed, the water of the inner harbour, on the doorstep of the DMYC was very calm and some boat would subsequently need a tow out to the race area. Race Officer Ben Mulligan (Flying Fifteens) certainly had his hands full as the breeze in the outer harbour was very fickle and shifting around very considerably. The committee boat was set up off the end of the western breakwater and the weather mark went in to the west of the Hi-speed ferry dolphins. That left the gybe mark of the triangular course in the approximate area of the harbour mouth and a leeward mark close to the green pontoon of the INSS.

Light winds for the PY fleetLight winds for the PY fleet

For the PY Fleet’s first start there was a traffic jam at the pin end as boats struggled to cross the line on starboard and instead tried to line up to make a snappy pin end port-tack start. Even from the inshore end of the breakwater, I could hear loud voices asserting their rights to do whatever they thought was right. It led to a right/left split of the fleet and Frank Miller scored by going left. For the subsequent starts of the ILCAs, there was further chaos, multiple sound signals and coloured flags flying. The Race Officer subsequently shortened the PYs to a single triangle and once they were finished started proceedings again with the ILCA 7s and 4s getting away first followed by the ILCA 6s.

 ILCA ILCA start Photo: Ian Cutliffe

The PYs then went into a second two-triangle race. The two ILCA fleets were then afforded a second one-triangle race so that all fleets went home with two races under their belts. The balmy, blue skies gave way to greyer clouds and more gusty conditions and some well-known combinations found themselves swimming a great deal more than they would have expected.

Viking Marine Frostbites, Round 6

1st Race
PY Fleet (28 boats)
1. Noel Butler
2. Mark Gavin
3. Mick McCambridge (All Aero 7s)
4. David Mulvin & Ronan Beirne (GP14 -14069)
5. Frank Miller & Ed Butler (FB – 14713)
8. Jemima Owens & Henry Start (RS200)
9. Tom Murphy (K1)
11. Pierre Long & Son (IDRA)

ILCA 7s (7 boats)
1. Gavan Murphy
2. Conrad Vandlik
3. Chris Arrowsmith
ILCA 4s (8 boats)
1. Emily Cantwell
2. Daniel O’Connor
3. Ava Ennis
4. Donal Walsh
5. Dylan de Vreeze

ILCA 6s (19 boats)
1. Alan Coakley
2. Sophie Kilmartin
3. Alison Pigot
4. Peter Kilmartin
5. Conor Clancy

2nd Race

PY Fleet (26 boats)
1. Mark Gavin
2. Brendan Foley
3. Noel Butler
4. Stephen Oram (All Aero 7s)
5. Roy Van Maanen (Aero 5)
6. Frank Miller & Ed Butler (FB 14713)
7. Sarah Dwyer (Aero 5)
8. David Mulvin & Ronan Beirne (GP14 14069)
10. Pierre Long & Son (IDRA)

ILCA 7s (6 boats)
1. Chris Arrowsmith
2. Conrad Vandlik
3. Gary O’Hare
ILCA 4s (7 boats)
1. Daniel O’Connor
2. Brian Carroll
3. Ava Ennis

ILCA 6s (15 boats)
1. Brendan Hughes
2. Archie Daly
3. Conor Clancy
4. Sophie Kilmartin
5. Judy O’Beirne

Fireballs Race within a Race

As usual, the Fireballs had their race within a race, with eight Fireballs starting amongst the mixed PY fleet. With wildly oscillating winds and probably an expectation that the wind would swing right the start line for Race One had a massive port bias making it almost impossible to get off the line on starboard.

In the midst of the chaos, Neil Colin sailing with Marjo Moonen (14775) managed to flip over to port and found a gap to pop through, pulling off a brave but perfectly safe and legal start. Frank Miller and Ed Butler (14713) played dodgems and managed to get off the pin without any contact. The pair found what there was of decent air and favourable shifts and led around the windward mark by several boat lengths. The pair extended their lead on the chasing fleet on the first reach, initially two-sailing it in the very light winds and hoisting only when there was enough wind to make a difference. Along the second reach, they were ahead of all PY boats by almost half a leg and rounded the leeward with a big lead. However, a third the way up the beat they were told the race was being shortened and sailed downwind again to dip the line and head up again for a windward finish, giving them line honours. They were followed home by Colin/Moonen (14775) and McKenna/O'Keeffe (15016) while Aero sailor Noel Butler won on handicap.

For Race Two Miller/Butler got off the boat-end favoured line cleanly about a third the way along and used their weight to good advantage in gusty conditions to pull away from the rest of the fleet. They led the two-triangle race to the finish this time followed home by McKenna/O'Keeffe while Colin/Moonen had a swim caused by the very difficult airs surrounding the weather mark. On handicap race two was won by Mark Gavin in an Aero.

The final race of Series 1 will be hosted next Sunday, 19th December. Competitors should note that due to the ongoing measures necessitated by Covid there will be no Series 1 prize-giving in the DMYC Clubhouse after racing. Regatta Director Neil Colin advises that prizes will be either be available for collection at the DMYC by individuals, or a plan will be made to get prizes to winner’s home clubs.

Published in DMYC

A record 69 boats were on the water for the fifth round of the Viking Marine-sponsored, DMYC-hosted Frostbites in Dun Laoghaire Harbour on Sunday 5th December, beating by one the attendance on the opening day of November 7th.

The PY Class took the numbers honours with a 30-boat fleet made up as follows; 10 x Fireballs, 6 x Aero 7s, 2 x Aero 5s, 2 x Kona Windsurfers, 2 x GP14s, and one each of K1, IDRA, Laser Vago, Mirror, RS400, RS Vision, Wayfarer and Laser Pico. The ILCA 6s (Laser radials) mustered 20 boats, the ILCA 4s (Laser 4.7s) 11 boats and the ILCA 7s (Laser Full-rig), 8 boats.

Mother nature decided she would comply with the forecasts from the latter part of the week and Dun Laoghaire was bathed in winter sunshine and a NNW breeze of about 10 – 13 knots (hand-held) at 11:30. The projection was for the breeze to drop as the afternoon wore on and so it proved.

An inaugural NYC match-racing event (report here) was operating in the area immediately inside the harbour mouth, so the Frostbite race area was set a little further inshore, but still allowed an Olympic course of three laps to be set. The NNW breeze was reasonably steady in direction and allowed a weather mark to be set about 150m inside the end of the West Pier, downwind of the INSS green platform. A gybe mark was set downwind of the marina entrance, with a leeward mark located in the approximate location of the Boyd Memorial on the East Pier.

All three starts got away at the first time of asking and most fleets seemed to favour a hitch out to the left-hand side of the course before making their way upwind to the weather mark.

In the PY Class, the Fireballs got into the leading positions on the water at an early stage with Frank Miller & Ed Butler (14713) leading the charge. (see Fireball report here) They were pressed by Alistair Court & Gordon Syme (14706) for the majority of the races with Neil Colin & Marjo (14775) hovering within striking distance and getting closer to the front paid as the race progressed. Eventually, their persistence was rewarded when the “pipped” Court & Syme at the finish line. However, on corrected time the Aero 7s dominated the podium with a one-two-three in Brendan Foley, Mark Gavin and Noel Butler. Miller & Butler finished fifth on time, followed home by the two Aero 5s of Roy van Mannen and Sarah Dwyer. The IDRA of Pierre Long & son took 8th place, followed by the Fireballs of Colin, Court and Louise Mc Kenna & Joe O’Reilly (15016) David Mulvin & Ronan Beirne (14069) won the duel of the GP 14s in 12th place, the Wayfarer came home in 16th and the Kona Windsurfers kept close company most of the way round with Des Gibney getting the decision over Robert Walker in 21st and 22nd respectively.

DMYC Frostbite FleetILCAs negotiate the downwind leg of the sausage at the DMYC Frostbite Photo: Cormac Bradley

In the ILCA 7s there was a change to the normal order of things when Kei Walker took the gun ahead of Gavan Murphy and Owen Laverty, meaning Chris Arrowsmith had to do with fourth. In the ILCA 4s who share the start with the ILCA 7s, two young ladies got into the podium places with Donal Walsh sandwiched between them – 1st place going to Emily Cantwell and 33rd going to Zoe Hall.

In the ILCA 6s the finishing order was Luke Turvey, Alana Coakley, Mark Henry, Brendan Hughes and Conor Clancy. This represents a bit of a slip by young Hughes, who normally registers much smaller numbers on his finishing scorecard.

As the first race progressed it became apparent that the wind strength was starting to drop off, as forecast, but also the direction was going more westerly. While the race committee team finished off the first race, the Race Officer reset the weather mark by moving it of the order of 75m further inshore so that it now floated on the inshore side of the INSS green platform. Another three lap Olympic course was signalled.

Monica Schaefer’s WayfarerMonica Schaefer’s Wayfarer Photo: Cormac Bradley

Yet again all three starts got away cleanly and in the PY class the Fireballs were joined at the head of the fleet by the Aero 7 of Noel Butler. However, in the lighter breeze which was of the order of 7 – 10 knots, the Fireballs would struggle to save their time and Butler led home another Aero 7 dominated podium on corrected time, followed by Gavin & Foley. Long’s IDRA, Schaefer’s Wayfarer and Mulvin’s GP14 all finished ahead of the first Fireball of Miller & Butler, followed by Court & Syme.

In the ILCA 7s, a more normal finishing order was reinstated when Murphy led home Chris Arrowsmith and Owen Laverty – the “more normal” reference being in terms of names, not finishing sequence! In the ILCA 4s, the younger ladies stepped in up with a 1-2 finish in Zoe Hall and Emily Cantwell respectively with Brian Carroll closing out the podium.
In the ILCA 6s, Brendan Hughes resumed his normal occupancy of the top step of the podium followed by another consistent finisher, Luke Turvey, with Conor Clancy, Archie Daly and Mark Henry closing out the top five.

So, to conclude, the biggest turnout of the 2021/22 Frostbites, a sunny winter Sunday, two Olympic courses of as big a size as can be fitted within the harbour and everybody finished in good time. What more could you want?

Viking Marine Frostbites – hosted by DMYC. Round 5

Race 1
PY Class (30)
1. Brendan Foley
2. Mark Gavin
3. Noel Butler
4. Paul Phelan (All Aero 7s)
5. Frank Miller & Ed Butler, Fireball 14713
6. Roy van Mannen
7. Sarah Dwyer (Both Aero 5s)
8. Pierre Long & Son (IDRA)
9. Neil Colin & Marjo (14775)
10. Alistair Court & Gordon Syme (14706) (Both Fireballs)
11. David Mulvin & Ronan Beirne (GP14 14069)
16. Monica Schaefer & Crew (Wayfarer 11299)
18. Tom Murphy (K1 69)
21. Des Gibney
22. Robert walker (Both Kona Windsurfers)
ILCA 7s (8)
1. Kei Walker
2. Gavan Murphy
3. Owen Laverty
ILCA 4s (11)
1. Emily Cantwell
2. Donal Walsh
3. Zoe Hall
ILCA 6s
1. Luke Turvey
2. Alana Coakley
3. Mark Henry
4. Brendan Hughes
5. Conor Clancy

Race 2

PY Class
1. Noel Butler
2. Mark Gavin
3. Brendan Foley (All Aero 7s)
4. Pierre Long & Son (IDRA)
5. Monica Schaefer & Crew (Wayfarer 11299)
6. Paul Phelan (Aero 7)
7. Roy van Mannen (Aero 5)
8. David Mulvin & Ronan Beirne (GP14 14069)
9. Frank Miller & Ed Butler
10. Alistair Court & Gordon Syme (Both Fireballs)
11. Ciara Mulvey & Peter Murphy (GP14 11111)

ILCA 7s
1. Gavan Murphy
2. Chris Arrowsmith
3. Owen Laverty
ILCA 4s
1. Zoe Hall
2. Emily Cantwell
3. Brain Carroll
ILCA 6s
1. Brendan Hughes
2. Luke Turvey
3. Conor Clancy
4. Archie Daly
5. Mark Henry

With seven races completed over five weekends – one Sunday was cancelled and another Sunday had a solitary race, the overall situation is as follows;

PY Fleet (42 Boats)
1. Brendan Foley (Aero 7) 19pts
2. Mark Gavin (Aero 7) 20pts
3. Noel Butler (Aero 7) 38pts
4. Frank Miller & Ed Butler (Fireball 14713) 38pts
5. Pierre Long & Son (IDRA) 44pts.
ILCA 7s (15 boats)
1. Gavan Murphy 8pts
2. Chris Arrowsmith 15pts
3. Owen Laverty 33pts.
ILCA 4s (23 boats)
1. Donal Walsh 16pts
2. Zoe Hall 26pts
3. Brian Carroll 27pts
4. Emily Cantwell 30pts
5. Ava Ennis 38pts.
ILCA 6s (43 boats)
1. Brendan Hughes 10pts
2. Mark Henry 23pts
3. Luke Turvey 29pts
4. Peter Kilmartin 45pts
5. Judy O’Beirne 47pts.
Fireballs (14)
1. Frank Miller & Ed Butler 14713, 8pts
2. Neil Colin & Marjo 14775, 20pts
3. Alistair Court & Gordon Syme 14706, 21pts.

There will be two more Sundays of racing before the Christmas break.

Published in DMYC

Dun Laoghaire’s future could lie in its potential as a hub to support offshore renewable energy projects.

That’s one of the conclusions from the €100k report commissioned by Dun Laoghaire-Rathdown County Council to develop a blueprint for the south Co Dublin harbour’s improved use.

Economic consultancy Indecon was tasked last year with preparing a plan for the harbour based on a critical evaluation of its strengths and weaknesses.

Its report — which is available to download below — comes on the foot of a choppy few years for Dun Laoghaire Harbour’s fortunes, from the loss of the cross-channel ferry in 2015 to the tumult of the COVID-19 pandemic since early 2020.

Indecon says: “The three main areas which should be given priority are to implement a financial economic recovery plan for the harbour, to increase linkages with the town and to maximise the economic and social impact of the harbour.

“These objectives require the development of existing uses and the attraction of new or expanded activities to the harbour.”

Further to this, the Indecon report makes a number of strategic recommendations to guide future development of the harbour. Among them is developing Dun Laoghaire as an operation and maintenance (O&M) base to support offshore renewable energy projects, and marketing itself as a hub for this growing sector.

“The Irish Sea is likely to play a particularly important role in this regard in the generation of offshore wind energy due to the proximity to market, availability of grid, and water depth,” Indecon says, adding that it understands offshore projects “have the potential to deliver 3.8GW as part of Ireland’s strategy to deploy 5GW of offshore wind between now and 2030”.

Such a direction is not without its issues, however, and the consultancy admits that “mixed views were expressed” on the harbour’s potential to support O&M. “Indecon believes that this represents an important development option but needs to be carefully planned so as to ensure priority to the recreational and leisure users.”

Other strategic recommendations in the Indecon report include:

Government action should be taken to support the harbour’s national potential: The report calls for investigating the feasibility of the designation of Dun Laoghaire Harbour and other key fishing ports in coastal communities as Strategic Enterprise Zones.

Support continued development of existing uses in the harbour: Indecon believes that it is in the long-term interest of existing users that additional activities and revenues are attracted to support the overall financial viability of the harbour, such as new marine enterprises and increase fishing landings. “There will therefore be a need to facilitate new uses and to carefully manage the trade-offs in the location of any expansion in existing uses,” it says.

Anglers on Dun Laoghaire’s West Pier watch a visiting cruise liner depart in 2019 | Credit: Afloat.ieAnglers on Dun Laoghaire’s West Pier watch a visiting cruise liner depart in 2019 | Credit: Afloat.ie

Targeted expansion of cruise business: Indecon says a targeted expansion of selective cruise businesses would be an important element of a sustainable economic plan. “This should, however, be undertaken in a planned way that would not damage existing users,” it adds. The consultancy also advises against Dun Laoghaire attracting mass cruise tourism due to its environmental costs and impact on the quality of life for local residents and businesses. “It would also not be consistent with respecting the value of the existing sailing and other users,” it says. In its recommendations, Indecon suggests a move to “increase overall tariffs for cruises but introduce incentive tariffs for selective cruise businesses which facilitate visitors to the town centre”.

Increase tourism and other visitors to Dun Laoghaire: Indecon recommends a joint initiative with Fáilte Ireland to promote Dun Laoghaire as a tourism location; expanding watersport tourism offerings and access for residents and visitors; and facilities for windsurfing and other sporting activities. It also supports backing plans for the National Watersports Campus, and leasing land for new hotel development on the waterside.

Maximise use of the existing ferry terminal: Indecon’s analysis indicates that the development of the former ferry terminal on St Michael’s Pier as a business innovation centre would have significant economic and social benefits for the area. It recommends working with leaseholders to promote a ‘Ferry Terminal Business Innovation Centre’, investing in maintenance works and involving the higher and further education sector in developing the skills required for innovative businesses to thrive there.

With its 800 berths, Dun Laoghaire Marina is Ireland’s largest | Credit: Tim WallWith its 800 berths, Dun Laoghaire Marina is Ireland’s largest | Credit: Tim Wall

Marketing of harbour and town: Indecon says Dun Laoghaire’s unique characteristics “open significant potential opportunities to attract additional recreational visitors and tourism. This will be key in achieving the vision outlined for the harbour and town. This will require integrated marketing which removes any disconnect between the harbour and the town, and a joint plan with sporting organisations, businesses and State agencies to market the attractions of Dún Laoghaire.” KPMG’s spatial and economic study of Dun Laoghaire town has also been published and goes into this topic in more detail.

In its conclusions, Indecon says it believes its recommendations “will help guide the sustainable development of the important national asset. The scale of the challenges faced by the Harbour should, however, not be underestimated.”

Dun Laoghaire Harbour RNLI shop, located in the harbour beside the busy East pier is the location for a new community defibrillator, donated by the family of Larry Costello, who died following a cardiac arrest in 2016. The family have funded six defibrillators which are located around the local area. Dun Laoghaire RNLI is a fitting final location, as volunteer lifeboat crewmember Gary Hayes has helped the family with the project, through his role with the Dalkey Community First Responders Group and as a RNLI crewmember.

In funding the defibrillators, the family wanted the community to have access to them in busy public areas and in doing so, to take away the fear that people have in using them. The Dalkey Community First Responders will undertake the upkeep and maintenance of the defibrillators and this one will remain charged by the RNLI’s electricity supply for the shop, which is located behind the lifeboat station.

Larry was born and raised in Dun Laoghaire and raised his family with wife Audrey in Glasthule. A much-loved member of the community, Larry worked in Blackrock Park and coached a local football team in Presentation College. When he died of a cardiac arrest, his family wanted to do something in his memory that could help another family in a similar situation. With the support of their friends and the people Larry coached and helped during his life, the family raised €14,000 and bought six defibrillators. They are placed at McCauley’s Chemist in Glasthule, the Sallynoggin Inn, the Igo Inn in Ballybrack, Eden Villas in Glasthule, Dun Laoghaire Marina and finally at the Dun Laoghaire RNLI shop beside the East Pier.

Larry’s family recent visited the lifeboat station to officially unveil the final defibrillator along with some members of Dun Laoghaire RNLI, including lifeboat crewmember Gary Hayes, who the family credits with helping them put their plan into action.

Larry’s wife Audrey visited with their four children, Graham, Jennifer, Emma and Ian, along with in-laws and grandchildren. In welcoming the installation of the final defibrillator, Audrey said, ‘Our hope is to save lives and we are grateful to the local RNLI for letting us put the final defibrillator at their shop, which sees so many people walk by every day. We never thought we would raise enough to fund six of these and it’s all thanks to our friends and neighbours in our local community and beyond. Larry was so well-loved, and I think people wanted to show that. We are so grateful for their generosity. Thank you too to Gary Hayes from Dun Laoghaire RNLI and Dalkey Community First Responders who helped us with this endeavour and suggested the station for the final defibrillator. It is a very fitting location.’

Dun Laoghaire RNLI volunteer lifeboat crew member Gary Hayes added, ‘We are delighted to have the RNLI be home to one of Larry’s defibrillators. While the lifeboat crew are here to save lives at sea, we are happy to have a lifesaving piece of equipment on land too, at the wall of our retail shop and available for any member of the public to use should they need it. There is no training necessary, and the instructions are clear and easy to follow. Well done to the family and friends of Larry for this fantastic gift to the community.

The family have asked that if anyone would like to donate to the upkeep and maintenance of the defibrillators, they contact the Dalkey Community First Responders.

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Dun Laoghaire Harbour Information

Dun Laoghaire Harbour is the second port for Dublin and is located on the south shore of Dublin Bay. Marine uses for this 200-year-old man-made harbour have changed over its lifetime. Originally built as a port of refuge for sailing ships entering the narrow channel at Dublin Port, the harbour has had a continuous ferry link with Wales and this was the principal activity of the harbour until the service stopped in 2015. In all this time, however, one thing has remained constant and that is the popularity for sailing and boating from the port, making it Ireland's marine leisure capital with a harbour fleet of over 1,200-1.600 pleasure craft.

Dun Laoghaire Harbour Bye-Laws

Download the bye-laws on this link here

FAQs

A live stream Dublin Bay webcam showing Dun Laoghaire Harbour entrance and East Pier is here

Dun Laoghaire is a Dublin suburb situated on the south side of Dublin Bay, approximately, 15km from Dublin city centre.

The east and west piers of the harbour are each of 1 kilometre (0.62 miles) long.

The harbour entrance is 232 metres (761 ft) across from East to West Pier.

  • Public Boatyard
  • Public slipway
  • Public Marina

23 clubs, 14 activity providers and eight state-related organisations operate from Dun Laoghaire Harbour that facilitates a full range of sports - Sailing, Rowing, Diving, Windsurfing, Angling, Canoeing, Swimming, Triathlon, Powerboating, Kayaking and Paddleboarding. Participants include members of the public, club members, tourists, disabled, disadvantaged, event competitors, schools, youth groups and college students.

  • Commissioners of Irish Lights
  • Dun Laoghaire Marina
  • MGM Boats & Boatyard
  • Coastguard
  • Naval Service Reserve
  • Royal National Lifeboat Institution
  • Marine Activity Centre
  • Rowing clubs
  • Yachting and Sailing Clubs
  • Sailing Schools
  • Irish Olympic Sailing Team
  • Chandlery & Boat Supply Stores

The east and west granite-built piers of Dun Laoghaire harbour are each of one kilometre (0.62 mi) long and enclose an area of 250 acres (1.0 km2) with the harbour entrance being 232 metres (761 ft) in width.

In 2018, the ownership of the great granite was transferred in its entirety to Dun Laoghaire Rathdown County Council who now operate and manage the harbour. Prior to that, the harbour was operated by The Dun Laoghaire Harbour Company, a state company, dissolved in 2018 under the Ports Act.

  • 1817 - Construction of the East Pier to a design by John Rennie began in 1817 with Earl Whitworth Lord Lieutenant of Ireland laying the first stone.
  • 1820 - Rennie had concerns a single pier would be subject to silting, and by 1820 gained support for the construction of the West pier to begin shortly afterwards. When King George IV left Ireland from the harbour in 1820, Dunleary was renamed Kingstown, a name that was to remain in use for nearly 100 years. The harbour was named the Royal Harbour of George the Fourth which seems not to have remained for so long.
  • 1824 - saw over 3,000 boats shelter in the partially completed harbour, but it also saw the beginning of operations off the North Wall which alleviated many of the issues ships were having accessing Dublin Port.
  • 1826 - Kingstown harbour gained the important mail packet service which at the time was under the stewardship of the Admiralty with a wharf completed on the East Pier in the following year. The service was transferred from Howth whose harbour had suffered from silting and the need for frequent dredging.
  • 1831 - Royal Irish Yacht Club founded
  • 1837 - saw the creation of Victoria Wharf, since renamed St. Michael's Wharf with the D&KR extended and a new terminus created convenient to the wharf.[8] The extended line had cut a chord across the old harbour with the landward pool so created later filled in.
  • 1838 - Royal St George Yacht Club founded
  • 1842 - By this time the largest man-made harbour in Western Europe had been completed with the construction of the East Pier lighthouse.
  • 1855 - The harbour was further enhanced by the completion of Traders Wharf in 1855 and Carlisle Pier in 1856. The mid-1850s also saw the completion of the West Pier lighthouse. The railway was connected to Bray in 1856
  • 1871 - National Yacht Club founded
  • 1884 - Dublin Bay Sailing Club founded
  • 1918 - The Mailboat, “The RMS Leinster” sailed out of Dún Laoghaire with 685 people on board. 22 were post office workers sorting the mail; 70 were crew and the vast majority of the passengers were soldiers returning to the battlefields of World War I. The ship was torpedoed by a German U-boat near the Kish lighthouse killing many of those onboard.
  • 1920 - Kingstown reverted to the name Dún Laoghaire in 1920 and in 1924 the harbour was officially renamed "Dun Laoghaire Harbour"
  • 1944 - a diaphone fog signal was installed at the East Pier
  • 1965 - Dun Laoghaire Motor Yacht Club founded
  • 1968 - The East Pier lighthouse station switched from vapourised paraffin to electricity, and became unmanned. The new candle-power was 226,000
  • 1977- A flying boat landed in Dun Laoghaire Harbour, one of the most unusual visitors
  • 1978 - Irish National Sailing School founded
  • 1934 - saw the Dublin and Kingstown Railway begin operations from their terminus at Westland Row to a terminus at the West Pier which began at the old harbour
  • 2001 - Dun Laoghaire Marina opens with 500 berths
  • 2015 - Ferry services cease bringing to an end a 200-year continuous link with Wales.
  • 2017- Bicentenary celebrations and time capsule laid.
  • 2018 - Dun Laoghaire Harbour Company dissolved, the harbour is transferred into the hands of Dun Laoghaire Rathdown County Council

From East pier to West Pier the waterfront clubs are:

  • National Yacht Club. Read latest NYC news here
  • Royal St. George Yacht Club. Read latest RSTGYC news here
  • Royal Irish Yacht Club. Read latest RIYC news here
  • Dun Laoghaire Motor Yacht Club. Read latest DMYC news here

 

The umbrella organisation that organises weekly racing in summer and winter on Dublin Bay for all the yacht clubs is Dublin Bay Sailing Club. It has no clubhouse of its own but operates through the clubs with two x Committee vessels and a starters hut on the West Pier. Read the latest DBSC news here.

The sailing community is a key stakeholder in Dún Laoghaire. The clubs attract many visitors from home and abroad and attract major international sailing events to the harbour.

 

Dun Laoghaire Regatta

Dun Laoghaire's biennial town regatta was started in 2005 as a joint cooperation by the town's major yacht clubs. It was an immediate success and is now in its eighth edition and has become Ireland's biggest sailing event. The combined club's regatta is held in the first week of July.

  • Attracts 500 boats and more from overseas and around the country
  • Four-day championship involving 2,500 sailors with supporting family and friends
  • Economic study carried out by the Irish Marine Federation estimated the economic value of the 2009 Regatta at €2.5 million

The dates for the 2021 edition of Ireland's biggest sailing event on Dublin Bay is: 8-11 July 2021. More details here

Dun Laoghaire-Dingle Offshore Race

The biennial Dun Laoghaire to Dingle race is a 320-miles race down the East coast of Ireland, across the south coast and into Dingle harbour in County Kerry. The latest news on the Dun Laoghaire to Dingle Race can be found by clicking on the link here. The race is organised by the National Yacht Club.

The 2021 Race will start from the National Yacht Club on Wednesday 9th, June 2021.

Round Ireland Yacht Race

This is a Wicklow Sailing Club race but in 2013 the Garden County Club made an arrangement that sees see entries berthed at the RIYC in Dun Laoghaire Harbour for scrutineering prior to the biennial 704–mile race start off Wicklow harbour. Larger boats have been unable to berth in the confines of Wicklow harbour, a factor WSC believes has restricted the growth of the Round Ireland fleet. 'It means we can now encourage larger boats that have shown an interest in competing but we have been unable to cater for in Wicklow' harbour, WSC Commodore Peter Shearer told Afloat.ie here. The race also holds a pre-ace launch party at the Royal Irish Yacht Club.

Laser Masters World Championship 2018

  • 301 boats from 25 nations

Laser Radial World Championship 2016

  • 436 competitors from 48 nations

ISAF Youth Worlds 2012

  • The Youth Olympics of Sailing run on behalf of World Sailing in 2012.
  • Two-week event attracting 61 nations, 255 boats, 450 volunteers.
  • Generated 9,000 bed nights and valued at €9 million to the local economy.

The Harbour Police are authorised by the company to police the harbour and to enforce and implement bye-laws within the harbour, and all regulations made by the company in relation to the harbour.

There are four ship/ferry berths in Dun Laoghaire:

  • No 1 berth (East Pier)
  • No 2 berth (east side of Carlisle Pier)
  • No 3 berth (west side of Carlisle Pier)
  • No 4 berth  (St, Michaels Wharf)

Berthing facilities for smaller craft exist in the town's 800-berth marina and on swinging moorings.

© Afloat 2020

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