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Displaying items by tag: Dun Laoghaire Harbour

At the beginning of 2022, eager parents from Dun Laoghaire’s waterfront yacht clubs came together to build the RS Feva fleet in the harbour.

With a two-year gap for the majority of young sailors and the growth spurt that goes with that, many young sailors were no longer small enough for their Optimists.

 With this in mind, the Feva Dun Laoghaire initiative was established where parents came together with the class association with the goal of getting as many young sailors out racing as possible.

This started with a racing series in May, followed by a busy summer season of the National Championships and Club regattas. The events have become more popular with a major emphasis on enjoying the events and having fun.

As a result, the Irish National Sailing & Powerboat has, for the first time, decided to take the leap and join in on the fun, with six RS Fevas available and a keen bunch of sailors, they have developed a programme to get these youngsters with no racing background out on the water.

INSS has developed a programme to get youngsters with no racing background out on the waterINSS has developed a programme to get youngsters with no racing background out on the water 

The programme is off to a great start, with three boats being booked within hours of launching. It consists of six weeks of training with the goal of entering in the RS Feva Easterns held by the National Yacht Club on the 17th and 18th of September, along with the September series.

If you have a young sailor who would be interested, please do not hesitate to contact the INSS.

Irish National Marine Services, the RS reps for the republic of Ireland, are supporting this initiative by offering a major discount for the year that's in it, in order to try and encourage the growth of the fleet both locally and nationwide, for any information on buying a Feva or parts or servicing please contact Heather on
[email protected]

Published in RS Sailing

Dun Laoghaire Harbour's St. Michael’s Rowing Club Regatta took place on Sunday, the 17th of July and brought together a large community of heritage skiff rowers from all along the east coast writes St. Michael’s Simone Sav

Coastal rowing at St Michael’s Rowing Club combines all the positive aspects of team sport, seamanship, fitness, competition and the great outdoors. The club caters for men, women and children with all levels of aspiration, from the recreational to the serious athlete.

Traditionally held every year at Seapoint, the event drew hundreds of spectators on SundayTraditionally held every year at Seapoint on Dublin Bay, the event drew hundreds of spectators on Sunday

With more than 100 crews, 17 races on the cards and participation of all age categories (from youth rowers as young as 10 to ‘vets’ in their 50s and 60s), the event was the largest coastal rowing regatta in Dun Laoghaire Rathdown in 2022. Traditionally held every year at Seapoint, the event drew hundreds of spectators on Sunday. This helps keep alive the tradition of the hobblers of old. With fixed seats, wooden oars, and clinker-built boats, the sport of heritage skiff rowing differs significantly from our freshwater ‘Olympic-style’ cousins.

"Heritage rowing is a sport for all ages - from youth rowers as young as 10 to ‘vets’ in their 50s and 60s"

St. Michaels welcomed Mary Hanafin, Cathaoirleach of Dún Laoghaire-Rathdown County Council, who presented the medals to the youth rowers. In a thoughtful departure from the usual format, the club opted for eco-friendly wood medals. After all, heritage skiff rowing is truly a sport that leaves no trace, which draws on the savvy of wood craftsmanship, the power of the human body and the maritime knowledge to cross any waters.

St. Michael’s rowing medals were in hot dema at SeapointSt. Michael’s rowing medals were in hot dema at Seapoint

Club members were also delighted to see several elected councillors and TDs stop by or promote the event via their social media: TD Barry Ward; TD Cormac Devlin; Councilor Justin Moylan and Councillor Peter O’Brien.

St. Michaels welcomed Mary Hanafin, Cathaoirleach of Dún Laoghaire-Rathdown County Council, who presented the medals to the youth rowersSt. Michaels welcomed Mary Hanafin, Cathaoirleach of Dún Laoghaire-Rathdown County Council, who presented the medals to the youth rowersd

The event was supported by local businesses: Access Hearing Centre, Dun Laoghaire; Acorn Landscaping; Ardcolts Supervalu Dun Laoghaire SC; Cafe du Journal & Bearhug Clothing, Monkstown; Cinnamon, Monkstown; Elephant & Castle, Monkstown; Georges Fish Shop, Monkstown; McKenna’s Bar; Specialist Orthodontic Practice, Glenageary; The Graduate Pub, Killiney.

The St. Michael’s Rowing Club committee, and in particular Captains Nicola Fitzgerald and Gareth Whittington, would like to thank all sponsors, supporters, club members and friends for their contribution to making the event a great success.

St. Michael’s Rowing Club was founded in Dun Laoghaire Harbour in the early 1920s. Today the club consists of over 100 members, from all walks of life, with all abilities catered for, from complete beginners to experienced rowers.

Crews train Monday to Friday from March to September, from 6 pm to sundown, in traditional wooden skiffs, as well as Celtic Longboat, with an offshore boat to be added to the fleet during the 2022 season.

St. Michael’s Home Regatta results - 17th July 2022

Intermediate Ladies
1st - Fingal
2nd - Stella Maris
3rd - Dalkey

Junior Ladies
1st - Dalkey
2nd - St Patrick’s
3rd - Stella Maris

Junior Men
1st - St Patrick’s
2nd - St Michaels
3rd - Stella Maris

Mixed crew
1st - Dalkey
2nd - St Michaels
3rd - Stella Maris

Senior Men
1st - St Patrick’s 
2nd - Wicklow 
3rd - St Michaels 

U12 boys
1st - Wicklow 
2nd - St Patrick’s 
3rd - Wicklow 

U12 girls
1st - St Patrick’s 
2nd - St Patrick’s 
3rd - St Michaels 

U14 boys
1st - St Patrick’s 
2nd - Wicklow 
3rd - Stella Maris 

U14 girls
1st - Stella Maris A
2nd - Stella Maris B 
3rd - Greystones 

Novice Men
1st - Fingal 
2nd - Bray 
3rd - Dalkey 

U21s Mens race
1st - St Michaels 

Senior Ladies
1st - St Michaels 
2nd - Wicklow 
3rd - Fingal 

Intermediate Men
1st - Wicklow 
2nd - Stella Maris 
3rd - Greystones 

U16 girls
1st - Stella Maris A
2nd - Stella Maris B
3rd - Wicklow 

U16 boys
1st - Bray
2nd - St Patrick’s 
3rd - Skerries 

U18 girls
1st - Skerries
2nd - Greystones
3rd - Bray?

U18 boys
1st - Wicklow 
2nd - St Michaels A
3rd - Skerries 

Vets
1st - Dalkey & Bray 
2nd - Dalkey 
3rd - Fingal 

Published in Coastal Rowing

An all-female lifeboat crew from Dun Laoghaire RNLI rescued four teenagers yesterday evening (Sunday 17 July) after they were overcome by the outgoing tide and found clinging to The Wooden Bridge at Dollymount.

The volunteer crew were alerted shortly after 5pm by the Irish Coast Guard following a call from a member of the public who was asked by a parent of one of the teenagers to raise the alarm. The crew launched the inshore lifeboat at 5.08pm and arrived on scene at 5.25pm.

This was the second time in the station’s history, that Dun Laoghaire RNLI launched a lifeboat with an all-female crew. The lifeboat was helmed by Laura Jackson with crew members Moselle Hogan and Hazel Rea onboard.

Weather conditions at the time were challenging with a choppy sea, the wind blowing a strong Force 4, and low water temperatures and a surging tide on scene.

The four teenagers were enjoying the hot weather and out no more than waist-high in the sea with a paddleboard when they realised they were being swept by the outgoing tide toward the underside of the wooden bridge.

The Dollymount lifeguards made best efforts to assist with lifebelts from the bridge deck but the casualties were struggling to secure a safe hold on them.

Arriving on scene, the crew observed two casualties in the water clinging on to the bridge, and two others 10m away on the paddleboard. As the tide was surging, the crew first rescued the two casualties under the bridge bringing them safely aboard the lifeboat and ashore. The crew then safely approached the two casualties on the paddleboard under the bridge, again bringing them onboard the lifeboat and returning them safely to the shore. All four casualties were shaken and distressed by their ordeal, but did not require medical treatment when brought ashore and into the care of Dollymount Lifeguards.

Speaking following the call out, Dun Laoghaire RNLI Helm Laura Jackson said: ‘We would like to remind anyone using a paddleboard in any depth of water to always wear a suitable floatation device, and to carry a means of communication with them in a waterproof pouch.

‘It’s also important to be wary of tides even if you’re familiar with where you’re swimming as sea movements are unpredictable, particularly when close to bridges and other structures.’

Published in RNLI Lifeboats

Deputy Jennifer Carroll MacNeill has repeated her call on Minister for Defence Simon Coveney to use Dún Laoghaire Harbour as a naval base in a response to Brexit.

The Fine Gael TD for Dún Laoghaire originally made the proposal in February but repeated it today following the Report of the Commission of the Defence Forces and as the Minister unveils a plan for expanding the Defence Forces

MacNeill said, “This report now needs to be taken seriously so we as a country can be ambitious with, and for, our military. There is a need to get quickly to ambition level 2 and to provide a pathway to ensure that this State can properly protect itself and its surrounds and respond to the needs of our citizens in difficulties around the world", she said in a statement.

Dun Laoghaire is halfway along the East Coast and is a harbour location that gives the Navy full control to enter and exit as needed without commercial constraints of other operatorsDun Laoghaire is halfway along the East Coast of Ireland and is a harbour location that gives the Navy full control to enter and exit as needed without commercial constraints of other operators says Deputy Jennifer Carroll MacNeill

“Brexit has proven that the stability of the status quo cannot be taken for granted and we have a need to develop the security of the East Coast and the capacity to patrol the Irish sea effectively", she said.

“The report clearly identifies the need for an enhanced national Recognised Maritime Picture to monitor Ireland’s territorial waters and Ireland’s Exclusive Economic Zone", the statement says.

The LE William Butler Yeats (P63) anchored off Dun Laoghaire Harbour in a busy Dublin Bay scene with local dinghy sailing and a visiting cruise liner The Navy's LE William Butler Yeats (P63) anchored off Dun Laoghaire Harbour in a busy Dublin Bay scene with local dinghy sailing and a visiting cruise liner Photo: Afloat

“With that in mind, there is an opportunity now for the Navy to identify a future home for such a patrol and Dún Laoghaire harbour is the obvious place for that"

“It is halfway along the East Coast, it is a harbour location that gives the Navy full control to enter and exit as needed without commercial constraints of other operators and it has the space and berthing area that is suitable. It is a state asset that is underutilised and would provide the Navy with a suitable, visible and high-profile location from which to operate on behalf of our citizens"

“It is clear from today’s report that the Navy needs to be expanded both in terms of assets and location. I am calling on the Navy to now assess the Dún Laoghaire harbour for suitability and would welcome them to Dún Laoghaire,” concluded Deputy Carroll MacNeill.

In a separate development, Dun Laoghaire Councillors recently gave the green light for Dun Laoghaire's Old Ferry Terminal as a 'Quarterdeck' co-worker space to open later this year.

Tagged under

Dun Laoghaire Harbour RNLI rescued a kayaker who was in the water for over 20 minutes on Saturday (2 July) after he got into difficulty off Dalkey Island.

The volunteer crew were alerted shortly after 4 pm by the Irish Coast Guard after a member of the public spotted the kayaker in difficulty half a mile off Sorrento Point and immediately raised the alarm. The crew launched the inshore lifeboat at 4.10 pm and arrived at the scene at 4.20 pm.

The lifeboat helmed by Laura Jackson and with two crew members onboard, immediately made its way to the scene.

While weather conditions at the time appeared calm closer to shore, the sea was choppy on scene and water temperatures were low.

The kayaker had come off his kayak and was unable to get back into it. Arriving on scene, the crew observed the casualty who was wearing a lifejacket, floating close to his kayak. They rescued the kayaker and brought him safely aboard the lifeboat before returning to Coliemore Harbour. He was then transferred into the care of the Coast Guard team for medical assessment but did not require hospital treatment.

Speaking following the call out, Dun Laoghaire RNLI Helm Laura Jackson said: ‘We would like to commend the member of the public who spotted the kayaker and did the right thing by raising the alarm immediately. Time is always of the essence in these situations.

‘We encourage anyone setting out in a kayak or craft of any size to carry a means of calling for help in a waterproof pouch and wearing a suitable floatation device as the casualty did today.’

Published in RNLI Lifeboats

Dun Laoghaire Harbour might see more of the R116 Coastguard Helicopter after this month's major inter-agency marine and coastal agency emergency services display at the Dublin Bay Port.

Held in the Ferry Marshalling Area of the Harbour on June 16th, the display was described as a 'non-public event'.

Arising out of the pow-wow, the County Dublin site has been highlighted as one with good connectivity and landing options for the coastguard helicopter.  This is especially the case concerning Ambulance transfer to nearby St. Vincent's Hospital at Elmpark in Dublin 4, according to one Afloat source.

The briefing dealt with emergency landing zones, evacuation procedures, Ambulance access points, Major incident facilities and Port Secure Zones. 

The operational briefing had static displays and equipment capabilities with the Irish Coast Guard's Dun Laoghaire Unit, RNLI Dun Laoghaire Lifeboat Station, Irish Coast Guard - Rescue Helicopter 116 and DLRCOCO staff from Dun Laoghaire Harbour and Dun Laoghaire Marina. 

An Incident Command Unit, Mobile units and equipment, an All-terrain vehicle, Dun Laoghaire's Trent class All-Weather lifeboat, D-Class Inshore lifeboat, and R116 were displayed.

Dun Laoghaire Harbour RNLI rescued Sadie, a boxer dog who had fallen more than 3m below the pier walkway close to the Half Moon swimming area on the South Bull Wall at Dublin Port on Wednesday (29 June) while walking with her owner.

The volunteer crew were requested to launch their inshore lifeboat shortly before 10 am by the Irish Coast Guard

Dun Laoghaire Coast Guard was also tasked but the 3m climb down to retrieve the dog was not possible for the shore crew. The crew launched the lifeboat at 9.58 am and arrived at the scene within 12 minutes.

Weather conditions at the time were calm, however with the tide out, exposed, slippery and jagged rocks running along the Bull Wall meant Sadie was in a precarious position.

Once on scene, the crew calmly approached Sadie and brought her on board the lifeboat where she was found to be shaken but safe and well, however sporting some minor cuts on her paws from the fall. The lifeboat then safely returned Sadie to her owner at the slipway a short distance down the wall.

Speaking following the call out, Dun Laoghaire RNLI Helm Nathan Burke said: ‘We were delighted to be able to reunite Sadie with her owner following her ordeal today and wish her a speedy recovery. The owner did the right thing raising the alarm when she was in difficulty rather than entering the water themselves.

‘We would encourage pet owners to keep their pets on a lead when walking near the water’s edge, close cliff edges or fast-flowing waters. If your pet does enter the water, don’t go in after them. If worried, call 999 or 112 and ask for the Coast Guard.’

As regular Afloat readers know, Dun Laoghaire's new inshore boat was christened 'Joval' earlier this month

Published in RNLI Lifeboats

Dun Laoghaire RNLI rescued two stand-up paddleboarders who got into difficulty off Seapoint in Dublin Bay last Saturday (25 June).

The volunteer crew were requested to launch their inshore lifeboat at 12.55 pm by the Irish Coast Guard. The alarm was raised by lifeguards who were on patrol at Seapoint and observed the two stand-up paddleboarders experiencing difficulty some distance out in Dublin Bay.

The D class lifeboat with three crew members on board, launched at 1.06 pm and arrived on scene six minutes later at 1.12 pm. As regular Afloat readers will know, this new lifeboat was officially named in Dun Laoghaire earlier this month

Weather conditions at the time were fresh to blustery with a Force 5 wind, a slight sea state and waves up to 1.25m.

Once on scene, the crew quickly located the two casualties and brought them on board the lifeboat where they were assessed and found to be safe and well. The lifeboat then safely returned them ashore at Seapoint.

Speaking following the call out, Eamon O’Leary, Dun Laoghaire RNLI Deputy Launching Authority said: ‘We would like to wish the paddleboarders well after they got caught out by a change in weather conditions at sea on Saturday.

‘As the summer holidays get underway this week, we would like to remind anybody planning an activity at sea to check weather forecasts and tide times before venturing out. Always carry a means of communication and always let someone on the shore know where you are going and when you are due back. Should you get into difficulty or see someone else in trouble, dial 999 or 112 and ask for the Coast Guard.’

Published in RNLI Lifeboats

After the disappointment of the blowout of last weekend’s (June 25) RIYC Regatta, this weekend’s Royal St George big event on Saturday 2 July is much anticipated on Dublin Bay.

The Frank Keane BMW George Regatta brings to a close the annual waterfront regattas for 2022 at Dun Laoghaire, which began on 12 June with the DMYC Regatta and was followed a week later by the Davy NYC Regatta.

Online entry is still available for the event, which comes with an equally packed onshore programme that promises a great day of fabulous food and family entertainment along with the excitement of racing on the water.

What’s more, the RStGYC Regatta Dinner is back this Saturday evening in the clubhouse. Click HERE to book a table at €55 per head and for any further questions contact Elle at 01 280 1811 or email [email protected]

Published in RStGYC

Dun Laoghaire Rathdown County Councillors voted last night, with 35 in favour and five against, for the reopening of the Dún Laoghaire Harbour ferry terminal as a co-worker, incubator space. 

Dún Laoghaire ferry terminal, which has lain idle for seven years, will be leased by the Council and open later this year.

The deal, which will see the publicly-owned building leased to Quartermaster Innovations Ltd for at least 13 years, was described at Monday night's council meeting as both a “shot in the arm” for the town and “privatisation beyond belief”.

As Afloat reported as far back as March 2020Lapetus Investments Ltd, trading as Quarterdeck Innovation, has envisioned a “co-working innovation space” within the St Michael’s Pier terminal building.

It intends “to create a technology hub whereby small and medium-size businesses can collaborate in a community-based environment that promotes and fosters entrepreneurship, through a spirit of innovation and creativity”.

The project team is led by accountant Hilary Haydon, a past president of Dun Laoghaire-Rathdown Chamber of Commerce and former Chair of Nutgrove Enterprise Centre.

And it’s hoped the scheme could create more than 650 jobs after five years in the south Dublin port town — which will pique the interest of the waterfront yacht clubs among many other local stakeholders.

According to Owen Laverty, head of enterprise with DLRCoCo a key benefits of the Quarterdeck Innovation project include generating in excess of three quarter billion euros in wages during the lifetime of the project.

And the project emphasises integration with its location, positioning the hub as particularly attractive for marine technology and research.

Lapetus/Quarterdeck intends to repurpose the building’s interior as a “state-of-the-art innovation campus” proposing “sensational sea views from almost every desk”.

In addition, its ground floor level would be a ‘Food Hall’ acting as a common area for co-workers to relax away from their desks, and which would also be open to the public as “an opportunity for strong local community interaction”.

The project partners have also pledged to “assist and collaborate closely” with the feasibility study team for the National Watersports Campus being proposed for Carlisle Pier to help “improve the harbour’s infrastructure resulting in improved access, job creation and strong tourism potential”.

The company established by Haydon will pay rent to the council of €400,000 per year, starting in year two.

According to the Irish Times questions were raised about whether Mr Haydon had sufficient track record to develop the project, but Owen Laverty, said he had experience, had invested significant sums in the project and would have tenants in by the third quarter of this year. He described the project as “very exciting” repeatedly.

Proposals to develop the former Stena ferry terminal were first made in 2017 but later scrapped over licensing issues.

More in the Irish Times here including reaction from Councillors

Tagged under
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Dun Laoghaire Harbour Information

Dun Laoghaire Harbour is the second port for Dublin and is located on the south shore of Dublin Bay. Marine uses for this 200-year-old man-made harbour have changed over its lifetime. Originally built as a port of refuge for sailing ships entering the narrow channel at Dublin Port, the harbour has had a continuous ferry link with Wales and this was the principal activity of the harbour until the service stopped in 2015. In all this time, however, one thing has remained constant and that is the popularity for sailing and boating from the port, making it Ireland's marine leisure capital with a harbour fleet of over 1,200-1.600 pleasure craft.

Dun Laoghaire Harbour Bye-Laws

Download the bye-laws on this link here

FAQs

A live stream Dublin Bay webcam showing Dun Laoghaire Harbour entrance and East Pier is here

Dun Laoghaire is a Dublin suburb situated on the south side of Dublin Bay, approximately, 15km from Dublin city centre.

The east and west piers of the harbour are each of 1 kilometre (0.62 miles) long.

The harbour entrance is 232 metres (761 ft) across from East to West Pier.

  • Public Boatyard
  • Public slipway
  • Public Marina

23 clubs, 14 activity providers and eight state-related organisations operate from Dun Laoghaire Harbour that facilitates a full range of sports - Sailing, Rowing, Diving, Windsurfing, Angling, Canoeing, Swimming, Triathlon, Powerboating, Kayaking and Paddleboarding. Participants include members of the public, club members, tourists, disabled, disadvantaged, event competitors, schools, youth groups and college students.

  • Commissioners of Irish Lights
  • Dun Laoghaire Marina
  • MGM Boats & Boatyard
  • Coastguard
  • Naval Service Reserve
  • Royal National Lifeboat Institution
  • Marine Activity Centre
  • Rowing clubs
  • Yachting and Sailing Clubs
  • Sailing Schools
  • Irish Olympic Sailing Team
  • Chandlery & Boat Supply Stores

The east and west granite-built piers of Dun Laoghaire harbour are each of one kilometre (0.62 mi) long and enclose an area of 250 acres (1.0 km2) with the harbour entrance being 232 metres (761 ft) in width.

In 2018, the ownership of the great granite was transferred in its entirety to Dun Laoghaire Rathdown County Council who now operate and manage the harbour. Prior to that, the harbour was operated by The Dun Laoghaire Harbour Company, a state company, dissolved in 2018 under the Ports Act.

  • 1817 - Construction of the East Pier to a design by John Rennie began in 1817 with Earl Whitworth Lord Lieutenant of Ireland laying the first stone.
  • 1820 - Rennie had concerns a single pier would be subject to silting, and by 1820 gained support for the construction of the West pier to begin shortly afterwards. When King George IV left Ireland from the harbour in 1820, Dunleary was renamed Kingstown, a name that was to remain in use for nearly 100 years. The harbour was named the Royal Harbour of George the Fourth which seems not to have remained for so long.
  • 1824 - saw over 3,000 boats shelter in the partially completed harbour, but it also saw the beginning of operations off the North Wall which alleviated many of the issues ships were having accessing Dublin Port.
  • 1826 - Kingstown harbour gained the important mail packet service which at the time was under the stewardship of the Admiralty with a wharf completed on the East Pier in the following year. The service was transferred from Howth whose harbour had suffered from silting and the need for frequent dredging.
  • 1831 - Royal Irish Yacht Club founded
  • 1837 - saw the creation of Victoria Wharf, since renamed St. Michael's Wharf with the D&KR extended and a new terminus created convenient to the wharf.[8] The extended line had cut a chord across the old harbour with the landward pool so created later filled in.
  • 1838 - Royal St George Yacht Club founded
  • 1842 - By this time the largest man-made harbour in Western Europe had been completed with the construction of the East Pier lighthouse.
  • 1855 - The harbour was further enhanced by the completion of Traders Wharf in 1855 and Carlisle Pier in 1856. The mid-1850s also saw the completion of the West Pier lighthouse. The railway was connected to Bray in 1856
  • 1871 - National Yacht Club founded
  • 1884 - Dublin Bay Sailing Club founded
  • 1918 - The Mailboat, “The RMS Leinster” sailed out of Dún Laoghaire with 685 people on board. 22 were post office workers sorting the mail; 70 were crew and the vast majority of the passengers were soldiers returning to the battlefields of World War I. The ship was torpedoed by a German U-boat near the Kish lighthouse killing many of those onboard.
  • 1920 - Kingstown reverted to the name Dún Laoghaire in 1920 and in 1924 the harbour was officially renamed "Dun Laoghaire Harbour"
  • 1944 - a diaphone fog signal was installed at the East Pier
  • 1965 - Dun Laoghaire Motor Yacht Club founded
  • 1968 - The East Pier lighthouse station switched from vapourised paraffin to electricity, and became unmanned. The new candle-power was 226,000
  • 1977- A flying boat landed in Dun Laoghaire Harbour, one of the most unusual visitors
  • 1978 - Irish National Sailing School founded
  • 1934 - saw the Dublin and Kingstown Railway begin operations from their terminus at Westland Row to a terminus at the West Pier which began at the old harbour
  • 2001 - Dun Laoghaire Marina opens with 500 berths
  • 2015 - Ferry services cease bringing to an end a 200-year continuous link with Wales.
  • 2017- Bicentenary celebrations and time capsule laid.
  • 2018 - Dun Laoghaire Harbour Company dissolved, the harbour is transferred into the hands of Dun Laoghaire Rathdown County Council

From East pier to West Pier the waterfront clubs are:

  • National Yacht Club. Read latest NYC news here
  • Royal St. George Yacht Club. Read latest RSTGYC news here
  • Royal Irish Yacht Club. Read latest RIYC news here
  • Dun Laoghaire Motor Yacht Club. Read latest DMYC news here

 

The umbrella organisation that organises weekly racing in summer and winter on Dublin Bay for all the yacht clubs is Dublin Bay Sailing Club. It has no clubhouse of its own but operates through the clubs with two x Committee vessels and a starters hut on the West Pier. Read the latest DBSC news here.

The sailing community is a key stakeholder in Dún Laoghaire. The clubs attract many visitors from home and abroad and attract major international sailing events to the harbour.

 

Dun Laoghaire Regatta

Dun Laoghaire's biennial town regatta was started in 2005 as a joint cooperation by the town's major yacht clubs. It was an immediate success and is now in its eighth edition and has become Ireland's biggest sailing event. The combined club's regatta is held in the first week of July.

  • Attracts 500 boats and more from overseas and around the country
  • Four-day championship involving 2,500 sailors with supporting family and friends
  • Economic study carried out by the Irish Marine Federation estimated the economic value of the 2009 Regatta at €2.5 million

The dates for the 2021 edition of Ireland's biggest sailing event on Dublin Bay is: 8-11 July 2021. More details here

Dun Laoghaire-Dingle Offshore Race

The biennial Dun Laoghaire to Dingle race is a 320-miles race down the East coast of Ireland, across the south coast and into Dingle harbour in County Kerry. The latest news on the Dun Laoghaire to Dingle Race can be found by clicking on the link here. The race is organised by the National Yacht Club.

The 2021 Race will start from the National Yacht Club on Wednesday 9th, June 2021.

Round Ireland Yacht Race

This is a Wicklow Sailing Club race but in 2013 the Garden County Club made an arrangement that sees see entries berthed at the RIYC in Dun Laoghaire Harbour for scrutineering prior to the biennial 704–mile race start off Wicklow harbour. Larger boats have been unable to berth in the confines of Wicklow harbour, a factor WSC believes has restricted the growth of the Round Ireland fleet. 'It means we can now encourage larger boats that have shown an interest in competing but we have been unable to cater for in Wicklow' harbour, WSC Commodore Peter Shearer told Afloat.ie here. The race also holds a pre-ace launch party at the Royal Irish Yacht Club.

Laser Masters World Championship 2018

  • 301 boats from 25 nations

Laser Radial World Championship 2016

  • 436 competitors from 48 nations

ISAF Youth Worlds 2012

  • The Youth Olympics of Sailing run on behalf of World Sailing in 2012.
  • Two-week event attracting 61 nations, 255 boats, 450 volunteers.
  • Generated 9,000 bed nights and valued at €9 million to the local economy.

The Harbour Police are authorised by the company to police the harbour and to enforce and implement bye-laws within the harbour, and all regulations made by the company in relation to the harbour.

There are four ship/ferry berths in Dun Laoghaire:

  • No 1 berth (East Pier)
  • No 2 berth (east side of Carlisle Pier)
  • No 3 berth (west side of Carlisle Pier)
  • No 4 berth  (St, Michaels Wharf)

Berthing facilities for smaller craft exist in the town's 800-berth marina and on swinging moorings.

© Afloat 2020

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