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Displaying items by tag: Dun Laoghaire Harbour

#DLHarbour - “All assets and liabilities” of Dun Laoghaire  Harbour Company will transfer to the local authority upon its pending dissolution — with no additional State funding available, the Minister for Transport has confirmed.

Shane Ross was responding in writing to a parliamentary question from local independent county councillor Michael Merrigan, which asked the minister to specify if any funding would be provided “to create a reserve to assist Dun Laoghaire-Rathdown County Council in outstanding liabilities as part of a final agreement of transfer”.

National Ports Policy recognised that the future of Dun Laoghaire port lies in marine leisure, marine tourism, cultural amenity and urban redevelopment,” Minister Ross wrote. “In addition, it clearly states that there is no Exchequer finding for any port company.”

Confirming that the existing port company’s assets and liabilities would transfer to DLRCoCo, the minister added that “the port will continue to generate income from marine-related and other activities such as rents, leases and car parks”, and that any remedial and engineering works “are normally prioritised” and funded via planned allocations.

Cllr Merrigan’s question raised concerns that Dun Laoghaire Harbour company’s financial liabilities “are greater than its liquid assets” and that the transfer comes with “risks and potential exposure” to the local authority.

The minister “needs to clarify funding” on the foot of a “€33.5 million burden on residents and businesses” in the county, the councillor added.

Last week, local Green Party councillor Ossian Smyth said the transfer of liabilities to the local authority is “not acceptable”.

Published in Dublin Bay

#DLHarbour - The proposal by Transport Minister Shane Ross to transfer Dun Laoghaire  Harbour’s liabilities to the local authority along with its assets is “not acceptable”, according to a local councillor.

Last Monday 9 April, Green Party Cllr Ossian Smyth shared the news that the minister had decided the “responsibility for the future of the port” lies with Dun Laoghaire-Rathdown County Council, in line with National Ports Policy.

Local campaigners broadly welcomed the news after a long period of uncertainly over the port’s future, with People Before Profit TD Richard Boyd Barrett hailing the decision as a victory for “people power”.

But now concerns have been raised with the particulars of Minister Ross’ letter to DLRCoCo chief executive Philomena Poole, in which he states that his “preferred model of transfer is that of dissolution of [Dun Laoghaire Harbour Company] and the transfer of all assets, liabilities and employees to the County Council.”

Cllr Smyth told Afloat.ie: “Dun Laoghaire’s taxpayers should not be left on the hook for debts accumulated by the harbour company while pursuing far-fetched projects like the super cruise ship berth, the floating hotel and floating homes, a hotel on the Carlisle Pier and so on.”

Published in Dublin Bay

#DLHarbour - Transport Minister Shane Ross must ensure there is “no delay” in the transfer of Dun Laoghaire  Harbour to the local authority, as Dublin Live reports.

Earlier this week it emerged that Minister Ross had made his determination that the “responsibility for the future of the port lies with DLR County Council”.

The move is being hailed as a victory for “people power” by People Before Profit TD Richard Boyd Barrett, a long-time local campaigner for bringing the harbour under public control.

Minister Ross is set to meet with the chief executive of Dun Laoghaire-Rathdown County Council to discuss the dissolution of Dun Laoghaire Harbour Company and the transfer of its assets to the local authority.

“[Successive Transport Ministers’] failure to act has meant that significant liabilities have built up and a lot of public money has been wasted,” said Deputy Boyd Barrett. 

“The Government needs to now stump up the money needed to cover these liabilities, while ensuring no delay in the transfer of the harbour into full public control.”

Meanwhile, DLRCoCo has signed a €9 million contract for the long-awaited redevelopment of the Dun Laoghaire Baths adjacent to the harbour, as previously reported on Afloat.ie.

Published in Dublin Bay

#DLHarbour - Has Dun Laoghaire Harbour finally been transferred to the local county council?

That appears to be the case, according to a tweet yesterday evening (Monday 9 April) from Green Party Councillor Ossian Smyth.

The tweet quotes Transport Minister Shane Ross, who has sole discretion on the matter, as determining that “responsibility for the future of the port lies with DLR County Council”.

Dun Laoghaire-Rathdown County Council was understood to be meeting yesterday following its earlier vote to recommend the dissolution of Dun Laoghaire Harbour Company and transfer its assets to the local authority.

Afloat.ie will have more on this story as it develops.

See also: Could Council Vote Signal a New Master Plan for Dun Laoghaire Harbour?

Published in Dublin Bay

Following Afloat.ie photos showing the damage to the West Pier at Dun Laoghaire after Storm Emma, this weekend's low tide and calm seas revealed further evidence of the pressing need for repair works to the Pier's roundhead. 

Damage to the surface of Dun Laoghaire's East Pier is here

West pier storm damage 0067Weathering and erosion of the apron just before the West Pier roundhead

West pier storm damage 0074Above and below: Cracks and subsidence in the roundhead wall

West pier storm damage 0061

Published in Dublin Bay
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#DLHarbour - Concerns have been raised over apparent damage to the East and West Piers in Dun Laoghaire Harbour that may be worse than previously estimated.

Visibly damaged stonework lies at the waterline of the West Pier roundhead some four weeks after Storm Emma resulted in “substantial damage” to the East Pier, as previously reported on Afloat.ie.

One large part of the concrete and stone ‘apron’ just before the roundhead, estimated at 50 tons, appears to have been upended and moved as much as 40 metres.

There are growing fears that this surface damage may indicate further damage undermining the structure of the pier roundhead

Evidence of subsidence is also visible above the low water line on the outside pace of the roundhead, which may also be a result of last month’s storm.

There are growing fears that this surface damage may indicate further damage undermining the structure of the pier roundhead — a problem that could be exacerbated by thrusters of cruise liners should proposals for a new berth come to fruition, it has been suggested.

It is not known what repair works would be required, though the issue of potential effects on the roundheads was raised during the oral hearing on the cruise berth plans more than two years ago.

Afloat.ie understands that the last time a significant breach of the harbour’s piers occurred was during the ‘great storm’ of November 1915.

Cracks and subsidence in the roundhead wallCracks and subsidence in the roundhead wall

Weathering and erosion of the apron just before the West Pier roundheadWeathering and erosion of the apron just before the West Pier roundhead

Published in Dublin Bay

In a further twist in the long running proposed cruise Line berth at Dun Laoghaire Harbour, An Bord Pleanála has written to Dun Laoghaire Harbour Company this week requesting them to furnish further information in relation to the effects on the environment of the proposed development. The board is also seeking further technical and scientific information on the project.

In effect, it means the board is still not in a position to make its determination on the Cruise Ship Project for the Dublin Bay Harbour that this week also saw its transfer into Council ownership move a step closer.

As regular Afloat.ie readers will know, a year ago Dún Laoghaire Harbour Company (DLHC) issued a statement on its cruise berth facility following a  court case decision in which environmental lobby group Save our Seafront, chaired by local TD Richard Boyd Barrett, 'won its legal action against the decision to grant planning permission for the Dún Laoghaire Cruise Terminal'.

This week's An Bord Pleanála request has drawn a swift response from Independent Senator, Victor Boyhan, who has expressed his concerns about the capacity of An Bord Pleanála to 'deliver planning decisions in a timely manner'. 

“In particular, I am concerned by its handling of the Dún Laoghaire Harbour cruise ship terminal project. A controversial development, by Dún Laoghaire Harbour Company, which has proven to be a very divisive project.”

“An Bord Pleanála received more than 150 objections to the project and it was expected that it would announce its decision to grant, amend or refuse planning permission for the development in Dún Laoghaire Harbour by 8 January 2016.”

“It further extended the decision date to April and thereafter extended it again this time to 17 June 2016.”

“Local residents and harbour users who paid fees to engaged in the planning appeals process are frustrated by the inordinate delays, in what is supposed to be a ‘fast-track’ planning process.”

“In recent days, an Bord Pleanála ( Ref: 06D.PA0051 ( PA0042) 7th March 2018, has confirmed that it is still not in a position to make its determination on the Cruise Ship Project and has written to Dun Laoghaire Harbour Company requesting them to furnish further information in relation to the effects on the environment of the proposed development the board is also seeking further technical and scientific information on the project.”

“I am calling on An Bord Pleanála to explain why it has failed to reach a decision on the controversial proposal within the initial 18-week timeframe objective set by the board and to give reasons for the ongoing delays in this particular planning saga.”

“The government expanded the remit of an Bord Pleanála to fast-track certain planning projects, this planning application case highlights the need for a new and more professional approach to deal with planning appeals.” 

Boyhan says the case highlighted the need for a total review of the boards capacity to achieved its own planning timelines and targets.

Published in Dublin Bay

With the recent damage to Dun Laoghaire Harbour by Storm Emma adding to the seriousness of the problem, last night’s decision regarding harbour management by the Council - and the comments issued this afternoon by the Save Our Seafront organisation – focus attention on a public matter of increasing urgency. The Save Our Seafront statement (given here in full detail) addresses many issues:

After a long council meeting last night, attended by many members and supporters of Save Our Seafront, the council voted 24 - 9 in favour of a motion proposed by Cllr Melisa Halpin and seconded by Cllr Dave O’Keeffe to support the Chief Executive's recommendation to bring Dun Laoghaire Harbour under democratic control of the council.

Save Our Seafront has long been campaigning for this, in order to ensure the development of the harbour in the interests of the people, the town, the county and indeed the whole country.

The vote took place in the context of a recent risk assessment received by the council which shows the figure of €31.5 million to bring the harbour up to “Taking in Charge” standard. This is a notional figure which may be needed to be spent over the coming years to maintain the harbour in first class condition. Cllr Halpin's motion went on to call for the Minister for Transport to secure the funds necessary for the ‘taking in charge’ expenditure that may be necessary to secure the structural future of the harbour.

Cllr Melisa Halpin said: “This is a historic opportunity for the DLR council and for the people of the county, and further afield. Dun Laoghaire Harbour is a Victorian harbour of enormous historic and cultural significance. It is the only intact such harbour in Britain or Ireland. It was the departure point for millions of emigrants and tourists for the best part of 200 years and has a special place in the heart of millions of people across both Islands.

“Today, the harbour is the setting for many international water sports competitions, the East Pier is walked by 1 million people every year. Sensitively developed as a public amenity the harbour provides a first rate opportunity to regenerate the centre of Dun Laoghaire and enhance the prospects of the town and the county as a whole.”

“Over the last number of years this opportunity has been squandered by the Harbour Company. They have wasted funds on expensive and frankly mad-cap projects such as the floating swimming pool, the new berth for mega cruise ships, a ten story apartment block on the historic Carlisle pier, a floating hotel, floating houses and high rise private apartments and hotels; In addition they have sold off a tract of land for private development. These plans never materialised because of opposition from the public, but millions of euros have been wasted in the process. It is high time this dysfunctional quango was wound up,”

Deputy Richard Boyd Barrett raised the issue with the Taoiseach in the Dail yesterday, calling on the government to act swiftly and ensure the quick transfer of ownership, the dissolution of harbour company and to find the necessary funds to ensure this transfer is not a burden on the council or the people of Dun Laoghaire.

He said : “Because of the lack of cooperation of the Harbour Company we still do not have a clear picture of the cost of bringing this under the Council but we are calling on the Minister in charge to make all necessary funds available so that there is no detrimental impact on the council services.”

“The government have sat on their hands over the last 7 years while reports of mismanagement of funds by the harbour company came to light. The current Minister has ignored regular requests by me to act on the Harbours Act 2015 and dissolve the Harbour Company”.

“The Minister and his colleagues in government should recognise the historical and cultural significance of this harbour and see any investment as an investment in our infrastructure and our cultural heritage. Now is the time to act swiftly and allow for the future development of our harbour in the interests of the people. I will be contacting Minister Ross for an urgent meeting to discuss the situation.

Published in Dublin Bay
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Dún Laoghaire Harbour Company is considering how best to proceed with the regeneration of the Carlisle Pier, a major leisure and cultural site that is located between the National Yacht Club and Royal St. George Yacht Club.

The pier is regularly used by both yacht clubs during major internatonal sailing events staged at the port for the the storage of competition boats for the course of a regatta, such as the recent Laser Radial World Championships.

It is currently in use as a car park and short–term berth for shipping for the unloading of some unusual cargoes and also a berth for cruise ships.

The Company now wants to gauge market interest in what it deems a 'significant opportunity'. According to planning guidelines, any development of the site should regenerate and enliven the waterfront, be sensitive to the setting and should include a significant portion of cultural and amenity uses, with public accessibility and permeability to the waterfront paramount.

The National Ports Policy suggests that Dun Laoghaire Harbour will position itself as an exciting marine leisure tourism destination of international calibre; one which elegantly integrates the local town with an historic 200-year old harbour, and which offers a striking blend of modern amenities mixed with a traditional marine ambience in a Dublin Bay setting, making it one of the most beautiful man-made harbours in the world.

The harbour is located in the busy town of Dún Laoghaire, which has two shopping centres along with a great range of restaurants, boutique shops, theatres, a magnificent new library and parks. Key to the town’s attraction is its transport links, DART station and key bus routes.

The N11, M50 and QBC’s provide convenient access to the city (5 miles) and surrounding suburbs. Many well-regarded primary, secondary schools and third level institutions are just a short distance away.

The Dun Laoghaire Harbour Masterplan proposes the regeneration of this major leisure and cultural site on the historic Carlisle Pier. This regeneration initiative could involve approximately 8,000m2 of space in a high amenity / high activity, publicly accessible environment.

The pier and associated lands are in temporary uses and circa 1.1 hectare historic waterfront site is available for imaginative proposals subject to planning.

Planning

Carlisle Pier is zoned Objective W in the County Development Plan 2016 – 2022. Objective W permits a broad range of regeneration combinations. Special Local Objective 16 relates specifically to Carlisle Pier and emphasises the cultural and amenity aspect of any future regeneration of this historic site.

For more details download the Market Consultation Regeneration notice below

Published in Dublin Bay

#DublinBay - An unusual visitor to Dun Laoghaire Harbour is a Dutch patrol vessel not to be confused with their navy but belongs to the coastguard service, writes Jehan Ashmore.

The 61m patrol vessel Barend Biesheuvel operated by the Netherlands Coastguard or 'Kustwacht' arrived yesterday from the homeport of Scheveningen.

Barend Biesheuvel berthed at St. Michaels Pier for the weekend and according to the Dun Laoghaire Harbour Company will remain in the port until Monday (but will not be open to the public).

The patrol craft however can be easily observed from the public plaza beside the disused ferry terminal. If your taking a stroll on the East Pier, the craft can be seen from beyond the bandstand. 

The word 'Kustwacht' painted amidships on the hull in addition has the customary angled red and white painted strips. This livery scheme is internationally recognised for coastguard and emergency towing vessels (ETV) world-wide.

The Netherlands Coastguard is an independent civil organization with own tasks, competences and responsibilities.

The main three goals of the service are :

- A responsible use of the North Sea;
- To provide services that contribute to safety and security at sea;
- Upholding (inter)national laws and duties.

The work of the Coastguard is to coordinate and carry out (15 operational tasks) for six ministries involved in the Dutch sector of the North Sea. Among the broad remit of the service involves customs monitoring of imports and exports, search and rescue, fishery monitoring and clearing of explosives. 

Barend Biesheuvel cuts a sleek profile from the bow where a stepped superstructure leads to the bridge on the third deck. Immediately aft of the wheelhouse is the work deck where among the machinary is a single forward 6 ton crane and an aft-mounted 15 ton crane to enable a variety of tasks.

Completed in 2001 the vessel is a larger version of a pair of sisters, though they do not feature an aft work deck and associated crane-handling capability.

Asides the patrol craft, the service has at its disposal an ETV, sea-going bouyage tenders and multipurpose vessels.

Published in Dublin Bay
Page 4 of 22

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