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Displaying items by tag: Lifeboat

Lough Derg RNLI Lifeboat launched to assist four people after their 34ft–cruiser ran aground by the Scilly Islands on Lough Derg today. At 1.39pm, the lifeboat launched with helm Ger Egan, Lian Knight and Delia Ho on board. Winds was east-southeasterly, Force 3. Visibility was good.

The lifeboat located the vessel at the junction of Scariff Bay and Parker’s Point at 1.54pm. The four people on board were safe and unharmed and wearing their lifejackets. Once the lifeboat was satisfied the vessel was not holed, it was taken off the rocks and into safe water. The cruiser continued its onward journey once drives and rudder were found to be undamaged and in good working order.

Peter Kennedy, Deputy Launching Authority at Lough Derg RNLI Lifeboat, advises boat users to ‘to bring charts with you and know the areas close to shore and islands marked as un-navigatable, particularly as water levels are low in the lake at the moment’.

The lifeboat returned to Station and was ready for service again at 3pm.

Published in RNLI Lifeboats
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Crosshaven RNLI lifeboat in Cork Harbour was requested to launch yesterday evening at 8.49pm after a report of a 9m RIB (Rigid Inflatable Boat) with two people on board hit a navigation Buoy near Tivoli in Cork City.

Reports also were given that one person was injured.

The volunteer crew made best safe speed on the 20 minute journey to the City. New information received en route stated the damaged RIB had managed to journey under its own power to Cork City marina, but was still requesting first aid help.

On arrival at the City Marina, the RNLI crew assessed the casualty who was complaining of chest injuries and administered first aid until the emergency ambulance arrived and conveyed the casualty to hospital.

The lifeboat then escorted the damaged RIB on its return journey to Crosshaven and assisted in putting the vessel alongside

The lifeboat arrived back at the station in Crosshaven at 10.50pm, where it was refueled, washed down and declared ready for service once more at 11.30pm

Published in RNLI Lifeboats
28th September 2016

Larne RNLI Rescue Two Kayakers

Larne RNLI has rescued two kayakers who got into difficulty off the County Antrim coast yesterday evening (Tuesday 27 September).

The volunteer lifeboat crew responded to a launch request from Belfast Coastguard at approximately 6.30pm following reports of two kayakers in difficulty at Ballygally Head.

The initial alarm was raised by a member of the public reporting two kayakers in trouble with one kayaker in the water.

Weather conditions were described as blowing a Force 3-4 wind with a slight swell and reduced visibility due to darkness falling.

Both Larne RNLI’s all-weather and inshore lifeboats launched at 6.42pm and the crews were quickly on scene. The casualties were located and recovered into the inshore lifeboat and were medically assessed by the crew.

Larne’s inshore lifeboat crew transferred the kayakers safely back to shore at Ballygally and into the care of the Coastguard while the all-weather lifeboat returned the kayaks to shore.

Speaking following the call out, Larne RNLI Coxswain Frank Healy said: 'The kayakers were located quickly this evening and returned safely to shore and we like to wish them both well following their ordeal.
‘Our volunteer crew train all year round to ensure when the pager sounds they are competent to complete any rescue and this training quickly swung into action this evening. We would like to commend the member of the public who contacted the Coastguard and we would urge anyone who sees someone in distress around the coastline to never hesitate in dialling 999 and asking for the Coastguard.’

Published in RNLI Lifeboats
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Four teenage girls who got into trouble whilst swimming at Main Beach in Bundoran on Saturday (17th September) have issued an appeal to find the body boarders who helped them out of the water.

The girls were in the water just after 6.30pm on Saturday evening when they found themselves caught in a rip current. A member of the public dialled 999 and the Bundoran RNLI Lifeboat and Rescue 118 helicopter were both requested to launch by Malin Head Coast Guard. Within minutes the Bundoran Lifeboat was on the scene having made the short trip from the nearby station, however, on arrival the girls had already been helped to safety by a number of bodyboarders who were in the water at Main Beach at the time.

A number of RNLI volunteer shore crew, trained in Casualty Care, also attended the scene and assisted the girls until the arrival of the Sligo based Rescue 118 helicopter which landed in the Astoria Car Park.
As a precautionary measure, the girls were airlifted to Sligo University Hospital from where they were subsequently released after having been given an all clear.

Now the girls are appealing for their rescuers to come forward so that they may thank them in person.

Published in RNLI Lifeboats
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There were double celebrations for the RNLI in County Cork this weekend with two new lifeboats officially named and blessed in Youghal and Crosshaven.

At a special ceremony held on Saturday, Youghal RNLI officially named its new Atlantic 85 class lifeboat, Gordon and Phil, while today (Sunday 11 September) Crosshaven RNLI named its new lifeboat John and Janet.

The honour of naming Youghal’s new lifeboat went to eight-year-old Izzy O’Connell, and Albert Muckley, Deputy Launching Authority.

Izzy who was diagnosed with a brain tumour in 2014 is a friend of the station. The lifeboat crew who have admired Izzy’s determination and courage, wanted her to play a special part in their day.

Ahead of the naming, Catherine Fitzgerald Hourigan, who has held several fundraising events in aid of the station, was invited to represent the late donor Gwenda Bull, and hand the new lifeboat to the RNLI.

Peter CrowIey, RNLI Vice President, accepted the lifeboat on behalf of the RNLI before handing her over into the care of Youghal Lifeboat Station. The lifeboat was then accepted on behalf of the crew by Lifeboat Operations Manager Fergus Hopkins.

Gwenda Bull, who lived in Brighton, East Sussex, admired the work of the RNLI as did her family. She funded various equipment for Shoreham lifeboat station and went to see the new Tamar lifeboat arrive at Shoreham back in December 2010.

Miss Bull also kindly funded the purchase of a new inshore lifeboat, to be named Gordon and Phil in memory of her parents. She was happy for the lifeboat to go on station wherever it would be of most benefit around the coast, so her funds were used to purchase the new B class lifeboat in Youghal.

Mr Hopkins remembered and thanked Miss Bull, adding that her generosity had given Youghal RNLI a lifesaver.

‘When the crew arrive here,’ he said, ‘and get kitted up, and head out to sea, we’ll have peace of mind. Because this lifeboat will help to keep them safe, as they save others’.

Pat O’Keefe, fundraising committee member recounted a historical call out before the Very Reverend David Herlihy, Parish Priest, the Very Reverend Alan Marley and the Reverend Tim Kingston lead the Service of dedication. Izzy and Albert then officially named the lifeboat Gordon and Phil, while pouring a bottle of champagne over the lifeboat which then put to sea.

The new lifeboat replaced Patricia Jennings which during her 13 years in Youghal launched 175 times with its crews saving nine lives and rescuing 233 people.

The celebrations moved to Crosshaven this afternoon where the honour of naming the lifeboat went to young Paddy Crowley, son of the late Con, who was a helm at the station prior to his sudden death last year.

Afloat journalist Tom MacSweeney was invited to represent the anonymous donor of the new lifeboat John and Janet and hand her over to the RNLI.

Speaking at the ceremony, Mr MacSweeney said: ‘On this occasion, the incredibly generous donor of this new lifeboat has decided to remain anonymous. We can all agree this is an incredible act of kindness and so I offer my sincere thanks to the donor and I know this lifeboat will be a much loved asset to the community of Crosshaven.’

Clayton Love, RNLI Vice President, accepted the lifeboat on behalf of the RNLI and handed her into the care of the Crosshaven lifeboat crew. It was Mr Love’s family who kindly donated the station’s former lifeboat, Miss Betty.

On accepting the lifeboat, Patsy Fegan, Lifeboat Operations Manager said: ‘People from all walks of life represent our volunteers who without a thought at any time day or night will drop everything when their pager goes off and come down to the station. When the crew arrive here, they prepare themselves and the boat, don their suits and go to sea to save the lives of others. This new Atlantic 85 class lifeboat will help to keep our volunteer crew safe, as they rescue others.’

The Very Reverend Fr Pat Stevenson and Reverend Isobel Jackson lead the Service of Dedication before Paddy Crowley, son of the late Con, officially named the lifeboat John and Janet.

Last year, Crosshaven RNLI launched 42 times and rescued 50 people. The new lifeboat replaces Miss Betty, the station’s first permanent lifeboat, which was on service in Crosshaven since the station was formally established 14 years ago.

The new state of the art Atlantic 85 lifeboat was introduced into the RNLI fleet in 2005. The lifeboat is 8.4 metres in length and weighs 1.8 tonnes. Improvements on its predecessor include a faster top speed of 35 knots, radar, provision for a fourth crew member and more space for survivors.

Fast, manoeuvrable and reliable, the B class operates in rough weather conditions, capable in daylight up to force seven and at night, to force six winds.

The new lifeboat, an Atlantic 85 is the latest version of the B class.

Published in RNLI Lifeboats

It was a busy afternoon for Dun Laoghaire All-Weather RNLI lifeboat, Dun Laoghaire Coast Guard and Coastguard Helicopter Rescue 116 woh responded to a calls with good intent as southerly winds are gusting over 50 knots on Dublin Bay today. The rescue services responsded to reports that three people were stranded at the Muglins Rock lighthouse at the southern tip of Dublin Bay, off Dalkey.

Crowds tuned out in Dun Laoghaire this afternoon for the RNLI Station Open Day on the Carlise Pier. Lifeboat tours ran from 11.30am to 4pm.

The Irish Coast Guard Rescue Helicopter 116 landed on the Carlisle Pier in an SAR demonstration as part of the Open Day festivities.

Dun Laoghaire Coast Guard Unit and the RNLI Sea Safety Roadshow were also in attendance. 

coastguard Heli dun Laoghaire 1 1 of 1Above and below: The Coastguard Heli 116 landed on the Carlise Pier as part of Dun Laoghaire RNLI's annual Open Day Photo: Afloat.ie

coastguard Heli dun Laoghaire 1 of 1

coastguard dun Laoghaire 1 of 1Dun Laoghaire Coast Guard Unit were in attendance Photo: Afloat.ie

RNLI Dun Laoghaire 1 of 1Youngsters enjoyed getting onboard Dun Laoghaire's inshore lifeboat at today's Open Day Photo: Afloat.ie

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A new Atlantic 85 lifeboat for Youghal RNLI is to be officially named Gordon and Phil during a ceremony at the lifeboat station in the Cork seaside resort town at 1pm on Saturday 10 September. The lifeboat which went on service in April was funded through a legacy from the late Gwenda Bull, a native of Brighton in East Sussex, England, who was a supporter of the charity’s volunteers in saving lives at sea.

Prior to her death at the age of 82 in 2013, Gwenda who lived near Shoreham lifeboat station which she visited regularly said in a letter that her family had always appreciated the RNLI: ‘Our family has always admired the wonderful work that the RNLI is doing…I live very near to a station and often visit them, I think you all do a wonderful job.’

Miss Bull who previously funded various equipment for Shoreham RNLI, including a fuel tank storage, the inshore lifeboat slipway, floodlighting, a maroon launcher and an engine for the D class lifeboat, kindly funded the purchase of a new inshore lifeboat, to be named Gordon and Phil in memory of her parents.

Miss Bull was happy for the lifeboat to go on station wherever it would be of most benefit around the coast, so her funds were used to purchase the new B class lifeboat at Youghal Lifeboat station.

Miss Bull’s wish to have a lifeboat named in memory of her parents will be granted when eight-year-old local girl Izzy O’Connell and Albert Muckley, Youghal RNLI Deputy Launching Authority officially name the lifeboat at the station next Saturday

Fergus Hopkins, Youghal RNLI Lifeboat Operations Manager said: ‘This is a very special occasion for our lifeboat station and we are most grateful to the late Gwenda Bull for her generous legacy which has funded this lifeboat, Gordon and Phil. Last year Youghal RNLI launched 12 times and rescued 10 people and we know the new Atlantic 85 lifeboat will continue to assist our volunteer crew as they go about their lifesaving work.’

Youghal RNLI was established in 1857 although Youghal’s first pulling lifeboat was put on service in 1839.

A lifeboat was built for the Harbour Trustees in 1839 by Taylor of Limehouse, the cost of £76 being met by local subscription. A tragedy had occurred Youghal in the previous year, when a hired passage boat carrying 33 people capsized on 18 February 1838, with the resultant loss of 12 lives.

In 1857 a lifeboat house was constructed by the RNLI at Green Hole in Youghal before a new lifeboat house was constructed at the Mall in Youghal in 1876.
This boathouse which had been much altered over 125 years for various classes of lifeboat, was demolished in Autumn 2001 to make way for a new station. A new Atlantic 75 boathouse was completed in September 2002 when Patricia Jennings, was placed on service and remained until April when he was replaced by the new Atlantic 85 lifeboat, Gordon and Phil.

During her 13 years in Youghal, Patricia Jennings launched 175 times with its crews saving nine lives and rescuing 233 people.

Fast, manoeuvrable and reliable, the B class operates in rough weather conditions, capable in daylight up to force seven and at night, to force six winds.

The new lifeboat, an Atlantic 85 is the latest version of the B class, introduced into the fleet in 2005. She is powered by two 115horsepower engines and has a stronger hull and greater top speed than her predecessor. The added radar allows the crew to operate more effectively in poor visibility and she also has VHF direction-finding equipment.
The vessel also has a manually operated self-righting mechanism which combined with inversion-proofed engines keep the lifeboat operational even after capsize. The lifeboat can also be beached in an emergency without causing damage to its engines or steering gear.

The Atlantic 85 carries a full suite of communication and electronic navigation aids, as well as a searchlight, night-vision equipment and flares for night-time operations.

The RNLI is a charity which relies on voluntary contributions and legacies.

Published in RNLI Lifeboats
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A new Atlantic 85 lifeboat for Crosshaven RNLI is to be officially named John and Janet during a ceremony at the Cork lifeboat station at 2pm on Sunday 11 September.

The lifeboat which went on service in June this year was funded by an anonymous donor. Afloat.ie's Tom MacSweeney will represent the donor at the naming ceremony and service of dedication and will officially hand the lifeboat into the care of the RNLI.

The lifeboat will be named by Paddy Crowley, son of the late Con, a long serving and much loved helm at Crosshaven RNLI who died suddenly last year.

Last year, Crosshaven RNLI launched 42 times and rescued 50 people. The new lifeboat replaces Miss Betty, the station’s first permanent lifeboat, which was on service in Crosshaven since the station was formally established 14 years ago.

Speaking ahead of next week’s event, Patsy Fegan, Crosshaven RNLI Lifeboat Operations Manager said: ‘The naming ceremony and service of dedication is a very special occasion for our lifeboat station and we are grateful to the anonymous donor who funded our new lifeboat. Since the lifeboat went on service in June, it has launched 17 times and rescued 34 people.’

Fast, manoeuvrable and reliable, the B class operates in rough weather conditions, capable in daylight up to force seven and at night, to force six winds.

The new lifeboat, an Atlantic 85 is the latest version of the B class, introduced into the fleet in 2005. She is powered by two 115horsepower engines and has a stronger hull and greater top speed than her predecessor. The added radar allows the crew to operate more effectively in poor visibility and she also has VHF direction-finding equipment.
The vessel also has a manually operated self-righting mechanism which combined with inversion-proofed engines keep the lifeboat operational even after capsize. The lifeboat can also be beached in an emergency without causing damage to its engines or steering gear.

The Atlantic 85 carries a full suite of communication and electronic navigation aids, as well as a searchlight, night-vision equipment and flares for night-time operations.

The RNLI first established Queenstown Lifeboat Station in 1866, following several wrecks with loss of life off Cork Harbour. However, the first record of a lifeboat in Cork Harbour was as far back as 1825, one year after the founding of the Institution.
Since the closure of Queenstown in 1920, many attempts were made to site a lifeboat in the harbour.

Based on the level of activity in the area, the availability of crew and temporary facilities, a decision was taken to place an Atlantic 21 on evaluation for 12 months in 2000 before the RNLI declared the station a permanent facility in 2001.

Miss Betty, the station’s first permanent lifeboat arrived in 2002 where she remained on service until June this year.

The RNLI is a charity which relies on voluntary contributions and legacies.

Published in RNLI Lifeboats
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Crosshaven RNLI Lifeboat in Cork Harbour was requested to launch yesterday evening at 9.45pm to reports of a speedboat broken down and adrift approximately one km south west of Trabolgan.

In calm conditions with a slight sea,the volunteer crew, under the command of Alan Venner with Ian Venner, Aoife Dinan and Vince Fleming on board headed to the area at best speed.

On arrival, the two anglers onboard the vessel had attempted remedial work with no results. The crew of the lifeboat then established a tow and landed the casualty at Crosshaven boatyard.

The lifeboat returned to station at 11.30pm and is currently being washed down and refuelled by the shore crew before being declared ready for service.

 

Published in RNLI Lifeboats
Page 11 of 67

Dun Laoghaire Harbour Information

Dun Laoghaire Harbour is the second port for Dublin and is located on the south shore of Dublin Bay. Marine uses for this 200-year-old man-made harbour have changed over its lifetime. Originally built as a port of refuge for sailing ships entering the narrow channel at Dublin Port, the harbour has had a continuous ferry link with Wales and this was the principal activity of the harbour until the service stopped in 2015. In all this time, however, one thing has remained constant and that is the popularity for sailing and boating from the port, making it Ireland's marine leisure capital with a harbour fleet of over 1,200-1.600 pleasure craft.

Dun Laoghaire Harbour Bye-Laws

Download the bye-laws on this link here

FAQs

A live stream Dublin Bay webcam showing Dun Laoghaire Harbour entrance and East Pier is here

Dun Laoghaire is a Dublin suburb situated on the south side of Dublin Bay, approximately, 15km from Dublin city centre.

The east and west piers of the harbour are each of 1 kilometre (0.62 miles) long.

The harbour entrance is 232 metres (761 ft) across from East to West Pier.

  • Public Boatyard
  • Public slipway
  • Public Marina

23 clubs, 14 activity providers and eight state-related organisations operate from Dun Laoghaire Harbour that facilitates a full range of sports - Sailing, Rowing, Diving, Windsurfing, Angling, Canoeing, Swimming, Triathlon, Powerboating, Kayaking and Paddleboarding. Participants include members of the public, club members, tourists, disabled, disadvantaged, event competitors, schools, youth groups and college students.

  • Commissioners of Irish Lights
  • Dun Laoghaire Marina
  • MGM Boats & Boatyard
  • Coastguard
  • Naval Service Reserve
  • Royal National Lifeboat Institution
  • Marine Activity Centre
  • Rowing clubs
  • Yachting and Sailing Clubs
  • Sailing Schools
  • Irish Olympic Sailing Team
  • Chandlery & Boat Supply Stores

The east and west granite-built piers of Dun Laoghaire harbour are each of one kilometre (0.62 mi) long and enclose an area of 250 acres (1.0 km2) with the harbour entrance being 232 metres (761 ft) in width.

In 2018, the ownership of the great granite was transferred in its entirety to Dun Laoghaire Rathdown County Council who now operate and manage the harbour. Prior to that, the harbour was operated by The Dun Laoghaire Harbour Company, a state company, dissolved in 2018 under the Ports Act.

  • 1817 - Construction of the East Pier to a design by John Rennie began in 1817 with Earl Whitworth Lord Lieutenant of Ireland laying the first stone.
  • 1820 - Rennie had concerns a single pier would be subject to silting, and by 1820 gained support for the construction of the West pier to begin shortly afterwards. When King George IV left Ireland from the harbour in 1820, Dunleary was renamed Kingstown, a name that was to remain in use for nearly 100 years. The harbour was named the Royal Harbour of George the Fourth which seems not to have remained for so long.
  • 1824 - saw over 3,000 boats shelter in the partially completed harbour, but it also saw the beginning of operations off the North Wall which alleviated many of the issues ships were having accessing Dublin Port.
  • 1826 - Kingstown harbour gained the important mail packet service which at the time was under the stewardship of the Admiralty with a wharf completed on the East Pier in the following year. The service was transferred from Howth whose harbour had suffered from silting and the need for frequent dredging.
  • 1831 - Royal Irish Yacht Club founded
  • 1837 - saw the creation of Victoria Wharf, since renamed St. Michael's Wharf with the D&KR extended and a new terminus created convenient to the wharf.[8] The extended line had cut a chord across the old harbour with the landward pool so created later filled in.
  • 1838 - Royal St George Yacht Club founded
  • 1842 - By this time the largest man-made harbour in Western Europe had been completed with the construction of the East Pier lighthouse.
  • 1855 - The harbour was further enhanced by the completion of Traders Wharf in 1855 and Carlisle Pier in 1856. The mid-1850s also saw the completion of the West Pier lighthouse. The railway was connected to Bray in 1856
  • 1871 - National Yacht Club founded
  • 1884 - Dublin Bay Sailing Club founded
  • 1918 - The Mailboat, “The RMS Leinster” sailed out of Dún Laoghaire with 685 people on board. 22 were post office workers sorting the mail; 70 were crew and the vast majority of the passengers were soldiers returning to the battlefields of World War I. The ship was torpedoed by a German U-boat near the Kish lighthouse killing many of those onboard.
  • 1920 - Kingstown reverted to the name Dún Laoghaire in 1920 and in 1924 the harbour was officially renamed "Dun Laoghaire Harbour"
  • 1944 - a diaphone fog signal was installed at the East Pier
  • 1965 - Dun Laoghaire Motor Yacht Club founded
  • 1968 - The East Pier lighthouse station switched from vapourised paraffin to electricity, and became unmanned. The new candle-power was 226,000
  • 1977- A flying boat landed in Dun Laoghaire Harbour, one of the most unusual visitors
  • 1978 - Irish National Sailing School founded
  • 1934 - saw the Dublin and Kingstown Railway begin operations from their terminus at Westland Row to a terminus at the West Pier which began at the old harbour
  • 2001 - Dun Laoghaire Marina opens with 500 berths
  • 2015 - Ferry services cease bringing to an end a 200-year continuous link with Wales.
  • 2017- Bicentenary celebrations and time capsule laid.
  • 2018 - Dun Laoghaire Harbour Company dissolved, the harbour is transferred into the hands of Dun Laoghaire Rathdown County Council

From East pier to West Pier the waterfront clubs are:

  • National Yacht Club. Read latest NYC news here
  • Royal St. George Yacht Club. Read latest RSTGYC news here
  • Royal Irish Yacht Club. Read latest RIYC news here
  • Dun Laoghaire Motor Yacht Club. Read latest DMYC news here

 

The umbrella organisation that organises weekly racing in summer and winter on Dublin Bay for all the yacht clubs is Dublin Bay Sailing Club. It has no clubhouse of its own but operates through the clubs with two x Committee vessels and a starters hut on the West Pier. Read the latest DBSC news here.

The sailing community is a key stakeholder in Dún Laoghaire. The clubs attract many visitors from home and abroad and attract major international sailing events to the harbour.

 

Dun Laoghaire Regatta

Dun Laoghaire's biennial town regatta was started in 2005 as a joint cooperation by the town's major yacht clubs. It was an immediate success and is now in its eighth edition and has become Ireland's biggest sailing event. The combined club's regatta is held in the first week of July.

  • Attracts 500 boats and more from overseas and around the country
  • Four-day championship involving 2,500 sailors with supporting family and friends
  • Economic study carried out by the Irish Marine Federation estimated the economic value of the 2009 Regatta at €2.5 million

The dates for the 2021 edition of Ireland's biggest sailing event on Dublin Bay is: 8-11 July 2021. More details here

Dun Laoghaire-Dingle Offshore Race

The biennial Dun Laoghaire to Dingle race is a 320-miles race down the East coast of Ireland, across the south coast and into Dingle harbour in County Kerry. The latest news on the Dun Laoghaire to Dingle Race can be found by clicking on the link here. The race is organised by the National Yacht Club.

The 2021 Race will start from the National Yacht Club on Wednesday 9th, June 2021.

Round Ireland Yacht Race

This is a Wicklow Sailing Club race but in 2013 the Garden County Club made an arrangement that sees see entries berthed at the RIYC in Dun Laoghaire Harbour for scrutineering prior to the biennial 704–mile race start off Wicklow harbour. Larger boats have been unable to berth in the confines of Wicklow harbour, a factor WSC believes has restricted the growth of the Round Ireland fleet. 'It means we can now encourage larger boats that have shown an interest in competing but we have been unable to cater for in Wicklow' harbour, WSC Commodore Peter Shearer told Afloat.ie here. The race also holds a pre-ace launch party at the Royal Irish Yacht Club.

Laser Masters World Championship 2018

  • 301 boats from 25 nations

Laser Radial World Championship 2016

  • 436 competitors from 48 nations

ISAF Youth Worlds 2012

  • The Youth Olympics of Sailing run on behalf of World Sailing in 2012.
  • Two-week event attracting 61 nations, 255 boats, 450 volunteers.
  • Generated 9,000 bed nights and valued at €9 million to the local economy.

The Harbour Police are authorised by the company to police the harbour and to enforce and implement bye-laws within the harbour, and all regulations made by the company in relation to the harbour.

There are four ship/ferry berths in Dun Laoghaire:

  • No 1 berth (East Pier)
  • No 2 berth (east side of Carlisle Pier)
  • No 3 berth (west side of Carlisle Pier)
  • No 4 berth  (St, Michaels Wharf)

Berthing facilities for smaller craft exist in the town's 800-berth marina and on swinging moorings.

© Afloat 2020

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