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Displaying items by tag: Lifeboat

Baltimore RNLI was launched this afternoon (Tuesday 25 July) to locate a vessel which had become lost in fog off the coast of West Cork.

The volunteer lifeboat crew launched their all-weather lifeboat following a request from the Irish Coast Guard at 3.32pm after a man aboard a 6.5m RIB (rigid inflatable boat) raised the alarm that he was unsure of his position due to heavy fog.

The vessel with one person on board had left Galley Cove on a day voyage. However heavy fog descended on the coastline and being unsure of his position he contacted the Coast Guard to request assistance. Baltimore lifeboat proceeded to a location directed by Mizen Head Coast Guard and once in the area used direction finding off the casualty’s radio signal to locate the vessel. The vessel was located at 4.20pm. At the time there was poor visibility, less than 100m on occasion, with a calm sea and no wind.

Baltimore lifeboat escorted the vessel back to Galley Cove, arriving at 4.38pm, and then returned to the station in Baltimore at 5.30pm.

The lifeboat had six volunteer crew onboard, Coxswain Aidan Bushe, Mechanic Brian McSweeney and crewmen Sean McCarthy, Pat Collins, Kieran Collins and Jim Griffiths. Kieran Cotter provided shore crew assistance at the lifeboat house.

Speaking following the call out, Aidan Bushe, Baltimore RNLI Volunteer Lifeboat Coxswain said: ‘It is important when putting to sea to have an adequate means of communication and navigation on board. If you get into difficulty at sea, call 999 or 112 and ask for the Coast Guard.’

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Baltimore RNLI carried out a medical evacuation yesterday afternoon (Sunday 23 July) after a man sustained injuries while on a visit to Sherkin Island off the coast of West Cork.

The volunteer lifeboat crew was requested to launch their inshore lifeboat following a request from the Irish Coast Guard at 4.13pm and were on scene in seven minutes. The man had cut his foot on a sharp object while out walking on Bán Strand on Sherkin Island.

Once on scene, two of the volunteer crew went ashore and administered casualty care before transferring the injured man to the inshore lifeboat. He was brought back to Baltimore lifeboat station at and handed over to the care of HSE Ambulance crew who were waiting at the station.

The lifeboat was helmed by Pat O’Driscoll and with crew members Jerry Smith and Colin Rochford and shore crew in attendance were Tom Kelly, Seamus O’Driscoll and Kate Callanan.

Speaking following the call out, Kate Callanan, Baltimore RNLI Volunteer Lifeboat Press Officer said: ‘In this incident with the considerable distance between the beach and the ferry pier and the nature of the man’s injuries, a medical evacuation by lifeboat was the best course of action. The man did the right thing in requesting assistance from the Coast Guard. Remember, if you get into difficulty anywhere along the coastline, call 999 or 112 and ask for the Coast Guard. We wish him a speedy recovery.’

Published in RNLI Lifeboats

On Saturday July 22, Valentia Coast Guard requested Lough Derg RNL to assist two people and their dog after their 38ft cruiser ran aground at Ryan’s Point, on the eastern shore of Lough Derg.
At 2.35pm the lifeboat was launched with helm Eleanor Hooker, Keith Brennan and Darragh Quinn on board. Winds were northeasterly, Force 2. Visibility was good.
Both passengers and their dog were found to be safe and unharmed and wearing their lifejackets. The RNLI made numerous attempts to take the cruiser off the rocks, but it was stuck fast. The RNLI volunteer crew decided to take both people and their dog to Dromineer and to arrange for the cruiser to be lifted off the rocks by a specialist crew from the local marina. They informed Valentia Coast Guard of their decision.
The lifeboat returned to station and was ready for service again at 4.32pm.
At 7.22pm, the lifeboat launched following a request from Valentia Coast Guard to assist four people in a 40ft cruiser with engine failure by the Goat Road, at the northern end of Lough Derg. At 7.40pm the lifeboat, with helm Eleanor Hooker, Owen Cavanagh and Kevin Dooley on board, located the cruiser adrift on the navigation route. The wind was northerly, F2/3.
The lifeboat took the vessel on an astern tow to Dromineer Bay, where the lifeboat volunteers changed the tow to an alongside tow before bringing the boat into Dromineer Harbour.
Once the cruiser was safely tied up alongside at Dromineer, the lifeboat returned to Station and was read for service again at 9.07pm
Brendan O’Brien, Deputy Launching Authority at Lough Derg RNLI Lifeboat Station, advises all boat users on the lake, to ‘bring charts of the lake in addition to electronic systems of navigation, and plan a safe passage before leaving harbour’.

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Fethard RNLI launched its inshore lifeboat yesterday evening (Thursday 6 July) to conduct a search after a member of the public reported seeing a kayak floating in the sea off Duncannon Beach in County Wexford.

The volunteer crew was requested to launch their inshore lifeboat at 7.50pm. They quickly assembled at the station and the lifeboat immediately proceeded to an area north of Broom Hill to carry out a search.

Weather conditions at the time were good with a light northerly Force 3 wind and a slight to moderate sea.

The crew located the kayak with no one onboard before continuing a search from Broomhill north to Duncannon, west to Woodstown, and back south to Creaden Head and east to Templetown. This was followed by a search from Templetown to Dollar Bay.

Meanwhile, the Fethard Coast Guard unit carried out a search of the shore while the Irish Coast Guard helicopter, Rescue 117 from Waterford conducted a search from the air.

The search was stood down after it was confirmed that the owner of the kayak had been safely located after swimming back to shore.

Speaking following the call out, Hugh Burke, Fethard RNLI Deputy Launching Authority said: ‘While the call out turned out to be a false alarm with good intent, we would like to commend the member of the public who raised the alarm when they saw the kayak. They thought someone was in difficulty and that was absolutely the right thing to do.
‘The search proved to be a great example of interagency work between ourselves and our colleagues in the Irish Coast Guard.
‘We would remind anyone planning a trip to sea this summer to always respect the water. Always wear a lifejacket and carry a means of communication. Should you get into difficulty call 999 or 112 and ask for the Coast Guard. If you lose a kayak or a board, please report it to the Coast Guard or the Gardaí.’

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Rosslare Harbour RNLI has rescued three men this afternoon after their motorboat encountered mechanical problems and broke down off the Wexford coast.

The volunteer crew was requested to launch their all-weather lifeboat at 3pm following a report from the Irish Coast Guard that the vessel was in difficulty eight miles north east of Rosslare Harbour.

The lifeboat under Coxswain Eamon O’Rourke and with six crew members onboard launched immediately and made its way to the scene. The sailors had been on passage from Dun Laoghaire to Kilmore Quay when they began to encounter problems.

Weather conditions were good at the time with a slight westerly wind.

Once on scene at 3.30pm, the lifeboat crew stood by as the sailors got their vessel started again. The lifeboat then escorted the motorboat safely back to Rosslare Harbour.

Speaking following the call out, David Maloney, Rosslare Harbour RNLI Lifeboat Operations Manager said: ‘Sailing and motorboating are popular pastimes and particularly so at this time of year. We would remind sailors and anyone taking to sea to always wear a lifejacket. Always have a means for calling or signalling for help and ensure everyone onboard knows how to use it. Always check the weather forecast and tide times and make sure someone ashore knows where you are going and who to call if you don’t return on time. And should you get into trouble, dial 999 or 112 and ask for the Coast Guard. The RNLI provides a 24 hour search and rescue service and our volunteers at Rosslare Harbour are always ready and willing to help.’

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Howth RNLI launched the inshore lifeboat Saturday 1st July to reports of 2 dinghy sailors finding it difficult to return to Portmarnock beach in heavy offshore winds.

The inshore lifeboat was tasked at 7.25pm to the scene just off Portmarnock beach and located a Grandfather, his grand-daughter and a lifeguard from the beach in separate dinghies trying to sail back to the shore against strong winds. The smaller dinghy was dismasted and under tow from the larger laser type dinghy.

As the young girl was showing signs of cold and fatigue the volunteer lifeboat crew called for an ambulance to meet them at the beach.

The casualties were taken aboard the lifeboat and the sailing dinghies taken in tow back to the beach where the young girl was met by her Father who had raised the alarm. Both sailors were treated and checked by the ambulance crew on arrival.

The wind was Force 5 and the sea state was moderate at the time

Speaking following the call out, Stephen Harris, Howth RNLI DLA said: ‘We were delighted to assist the sailors after they found themselves in difficulty. The Father had quickly radioed for assistance which was the correct thing to do and we were able to launch and bring the sailors to safety.’

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The most recent launch took place on Friday last, 23 June at 11pm. Larne's all-weather lifeboat Dr John McSparron and inshore lifeboat Terry launched on request of Belfast Coastguard to reports of two overdue kayakers. Both boats completed a search north from Larne with the kayakers located safe and well at Drumnagreagh.

Larne RNLI launched both lifeboats on Sunday 11 June to a 36ft yacht experiencing engine difficulties near the entrance to Larne Lough. On arrival, a volunteer lifeboat crew member was transferred onto the yacht to check the three on board were safe and well. A towline was then established before the lifeboat brought the yacht into the safety of Larne harbour.

Only 2 days later (Tuesday 13 June) Larne inshore lifeboat was launched following reports of an over-turned kayak at Carnfunnock. A multi-agency search took place but nothing was found indicating a false alarm with good intent.

The volunteer crew pagers sounded again on Sunday 18 June. Both Larne lifeboats launched to assist a vessel with two adults and two children on board that was taking on water in Drains Bay. The all-weather lifeboat was stood down by Belfast Coastguard after it was confirmed that the vessel had made it ashore. The inshore lifeboat continued to Carnfunnock to ensure no assistance was required and all onboard the vessel were safely ashore.

On Monday 19 June the lifeboat crew were requested to launch by Belfast coastguard at 8.40pm after reports that five teenagers were stranded on rocks at Blackarch. Larne RNLI immediately launched both lifeboats and was on scene within minutes. After putting the group into lifejackets, the lifeboat crew carefully transferred them onboard the inshore lifeboat. They then made the short trip out to the all-weather lifeboat where they were then transferred onboard and their condition assessed. Members of the Larne Coastguard were also on scene and provided valuable ground support during the operation.

Larne RNLI Coxswain Frank Healy said: 'This has been a busy few weeks for our volunteer crew who drop everything to answer the call when their pagers sound. Our crews are highly trained and skilled, and excellent team work ensured that all five launches were completed safely and successfully.'

Coming into the summer season the RNLI is promoting its national drowning prevention campaign, Respect the Water. It is aimed at promoting safety advice to all who visit the coast. The RNLI want everyone to enjoy the water, but also want people to recognise its dangers and never underestimate its power. This year, Respect the Water will focus on simple floating skills that could save a life. If you find yourself unexpectedly in the water, he advice is to float to increase your chances of survival. If you see someone else in trouble in the water, call 999 or 112 and ask for the Coastguard.

Allan Dorman, Larne RNLI Lifeboat Operations Manager advises: ‘For those who are planning to visit the sea please check the weather and tides before heading to the coast, tell someone where you're going and when you expect to be back. Wear a lifejacket and always carry a means of calling for help. And if you see someone in danger in the water, call 999 and ask for the Coastguard.’

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Larne RNLI launched their all-weather lifeboat Dr John McSparron and inshore lifeboat Terry this afternoon (Sunday 11 June) to a 36ft yacht experiencing engine difficulties near the entrance to Larne Lough.

The all-weather lifeboat under Coxswain Frank Healy launched at 1.15pm and made its way to the scene north of the Port of Larne’s number one buoy. On arrival, a volunteer lifeboat crew member transferred onto the yacht where he first checked that the three on board were safe and well. The gear box onboard the yacht was broken and weather conditions presenting a force 3-4 southerly wind meant the crew of the vessel were unable to sail safely back to their mooring in Larne Lough.

The lifeboat crew established a towline before the lifeboat brought the yacht into the safety of Larne harbour. The all-weather lifeboat was met by the station’s inshore lifeboat which assisted to place the boat safely on the mooring.

Speaking following the call out, Larne RNLI Coxswain Frank Healy said: ‘All the crew training was put into action today to carry out a safe and efficient rescue. An excellent team effort ensured that the tow line was set up speedily and the yacht with two adults and a child onboard was safely on its mooring without delay.’

 

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The Duke of Kent visited Kilrush RNLI yesterday afternoon as part of a two-day tour of lifeboat stations in Tipperary, Clare and Kerry. The Duke has been President of the RNLI since 1969.

The Duke of Kent arrived at Kilrush Lifeboat Station shortly after 03:00pm, where His Royal Highness was greeted by the volunteer lifeboat operations team, lifeboat crew members and the local fundraising branch.

As part of the visit, Kilrush RNLI showcased local Irish dancing, the Irish Whale & Dolphin Group, handcrafted traditional Irish Currach building, and a selection of local pottery from the Brothers of Charity. Also, in attendance were representatives from Kilrush GAA which focused on the partnership between the GAA and RNLI working together to prevent drowning.

To conclude, a beautiful Irish Yew tree was planted at Kilrush lifeboat station to honour the visit, followed by a brief launch and recovery of Kilrush RNLI’s Atlantic 85 lifeboat.

Commenting on the event, Pauline Dunleavy, Kilrush Lifeboat Operations Manager said: ‘It was an honour to welcome His Royal Highness to Kilrush lifeboat station. We are very proud of our station delighted to host the President of the RNLI. We showcased our great team, as well as great community spirit. In particular, I would like to thank Kilrush GAA for attending. Much like a lifeboat station, a GAA club is at the heart of community life, and through this partnership we all can both play a major role in preventing deaths by drowning.”

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Lough Derg RNLI Lifeboat launched to assist 2 people after their 26ft–yacht went aground below Coolbawn on Lough Derg

At 8.30pm Saturday, May 27, Valentia Coast Guard requested Lough Derg RNLI Lifeboat to launch to assist 2 people after their 26ft yacht went aground below Coolbawn on the Tipperary shore of Lough Derg.

At 8.40pm, the lifeboat launched with helm Eleanor Hooker, Owen Cavanagh and Delia Ho on board. Winds was north-westerly, Force 4/5. Visibility was good but with dusk imminent.

The lifeboat located the casualty vessel at 8.55pm. Two RNLI volunteers waded in to the casualty vessel, which was on a rocky shoal in 2ft of water. Both passengers were found to be safe and unharmed and wearing their lifejackets. The RNLI volunteers checked the boat and once satisfied that it was not holed, set up bridle and tow. One RNLI crew member remained on board and the other returned to the lifeboat. The vessel was taken gently off the rocks and towed into deep water, where the lifeboat removed the tow and the yacht made way using its outboard motor.

However, after a short period, their outboard motor failed. The lifeboat came alongside and transferred a crew member across, where he helped refuel, prime and vent their fuel tank. The lifeboat remained with the yacht and her crew until she was tied safely alongside at Kilgarvin Harbour.

Liam Maloney, Lifeboat Operations Manager at Lough Derg RNLI Lifeboat, advises boat users to ‘bring charts with you and identify the areas close to shore and islands marked as not navigable’. He commended the crew of the yacht for carrying a spare tank of fuel on board.

The lifeboat returned to station and was ready for service again at 11.00pm.

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Dun Laoghaire Harbour Information

Dun Laoghaire Harbour is the second port for Dublin and is located on the south shore of Dublin Bay. Marine uses for this 200-year-old man-made harbour have changed over its lifetime. Originally built as a port of refuge for sailing ships entering the narrow channel at Dublin Port, the harbour has had a continuous ferry link with Wales and this was the principal activity of the harbour until the service stopped in 2015. In all this time, however, one thing has remained constant and that is the popularity for sailing and boating from the port, making it Ireland's marine leisure capital with a harbour fleet of over 1,200-1.600 pleasure craft.

Dun Laoghaire Harbour Bye-Laws

Download the bye-laws on this link here

FAQs

A live stream Dublin Bay webcam showing Dun Laoghaire Harbour entrance and East Pier is here

Dun Laoghaire is a Dublin suburb situated on the south side of Dublin Bay, approximately, 15km from Dublin city centre.

The east and west piers of the harbour are each of 1 kilometre (0.62 miles) long.

The harbour entrance is 232 metres (761 ft) across from East to West Pier.

  • Public Boatyard
  • Public slipway
  • Public Marina

23 clubs, 14 activity providers and eight state-related organisations operate from Dun Laoghaire Harbour that facilitates a full range of sports - Sailing, Rowing, Diving, Windsurfing, Angling, Canoeing, Swimming, Triathlon, Powerboating, Kayaking and Paddleboarding. Participants include members of the public, club members, tourists, disabled, disadvantaged, event competitors, schools, youth groups and college students.

  • Commissioners of Irish Lights
  • Dun Laoghaire Marina
  • MGM Boats & Boatyard
  • Coastguard
  • Naval Service Reserve
  • Royal National Lifeboat Institution
  • Marine Activity Centre
  • Rowing clubs
  • Yachting and Sailing Clubs
  • Sailing Schools
  • Irish Olympic Sailing Team
  • Chandlery & Boat Supply Stores

The east and west granite-built piers of Dun Laoghaire harbour are each of one kilometre (0.62 mi) long and enclose an area of 250 acres (1.0 km2) with the harbour entrance being 232 metres (761 ft) in width.

In 2018, the ownership of the great granite was transferred in its entirety to Dun Laoghaire Rathdown County Council who now operate and manage the harbour. Prior to that, the harbour was operated by The Dun Laoghaire Harbour Company, a state company, dissolved in 2018 under the Ports Act.

  • 1817 - Construction of the East Pier to a design by John Rennie began in 1817 with Earl Whitworth Lord Lieutenant of Ireland laying the first stone.
  • 1820 - Rennie had concerns a single pier would be subject to silting, and by 1820 gained support for the construction of the West pier to begin shortly afterwards. When King George IV left Ireland from the harbour in 1820, Dunleary was renamed Kingstown, a name that was to remain in use for nearly 100 years. The harbour was named the Royal Harbour of George the Fourth which seems not to have remained for so long.
  • 1824 - saw over 3,000 boats shelter in the partially completed harbour, but it also saw the beginning of operations off the North Wall which alleviated many of the issues ships were having accessing Dublin Port.
  • 1826 - Kingstown harbour gained the important mail packet service which at the time was under the stewardship of the Admiralty with a wharf completed on the East Pier in the following year. The service was transferred from Howth whose harbour had suffered from silting and the need for frequent dredging.
  • 1831 - Royal Irish Yacht Club founded
  • 1837 - saw the creation of Victoria Wharf, since renamed St. Michael's Wharf with the D&KR extended and a new terminus created convenient to the wharf.[8] The extended line had cut a chord across the old harbour with the landward pool so created later filled in.
  • 1838 - Royal St George Yacht Club founded
  • 1842 - By this time the largest man-made harbour in Western Europe had been completed with the construction of the East Pier lighthouse.
  • 1855 - The harbour was further enhanced by the completion of Traders Wharf in 1855 and Carlisle Pier in 1856. The mid-1850s also saw the completion of the West Pier lighthouse. The railway was connected to Bray in 1856
  • 1871 - National Yacht Club founded
  • 1884 - Dublin Bay Sailing Club founded
  • 1918 - The Mailboat, “The RMS Leinster” sailed out of Dún Laoghaire with 685 people on board. 22 were post office workers sorting the mail; 70 were crew and the vast majority of the passengers were soldiers returning to the battlefields of World War I. The ship was torpedoed by a German U-boat near the Kish lighthouse killing many of those onboard.
  • 1920 - Kingstown reverted to the name Dún Laoghaire in 1920 and in 1924 the harbour was officially renamed "Dun Laoghaire Harbour"
  • 1944 - a diaphone fog signal was installed at the East Pier
  • 1965 - Dun Laoghaire Motor Yacht Club founded
  • 1968 - The East Pier lighthouse station switched from vapourised paraffin to electricity, and became unmanned. The new candle-power was 226,000
  • 1977- A flying boat landed in Dun Laoghaire Harbour, one of the most unusual visitors
  • 1978 - Irish National Sailing School founded
  • 1934 - saw the Dublin and Kingstown Railway begin operations from their terminus at Westland Row to a terminus at the West Pier which began at the old harbour
  • 2001 - Dun Laoghaire Marina opens with 500 berths
  • 2015 - Ferry services cease bringing to an end a 200-year continuous link with Wales.
  • 2017- Bicentenary celebrations and time capsule laid.
  • 2018 - Dun Laoghaire Harbour Company dissolved, the harbour is transferred into the hands of Dun Laoghaire Rathdown County Council

From East pier to West Pier the waterfront clubs are:

  • National Yacht Club. Read latest NYC news here
  • Royal St. George Yacht Club. Read latest RSTGYC news here
  • Royal Irish Yacht Club. Read latest RIYC news here
  • Dun Laoghaire Motor Yacht Club. Read latest DMYC news here

 

The umbrella organisation that organises weekly racing in summer and winter on Dublin Bay for all the yacht clubs is Dublin Bay Sailing Club. It has no clubhouse of its own but operates through the clubs with two x Committee vessels and a starters hut on the West Pier. Read the latest DBSC news here.

The sailing community is a key stakeholder in Dún Laoghaire. The clubs attract many visitors from home and abroad and attract major international sailing events to the harbour.

 

Dun Laoghaire Regatta

Dun Laoghaire's biennial town regatta was started in 2005 as a joint cooperation by the town's major yacht clubs. It was an immediate success and is now in its eighth edition and has become Ireland's biggest sailing event. The combined club's regatta is held in the first week of July.

  • Attracts 500 boats and more from overseas and around the country
  • Four-day championship involving 2,500 sailors with supporting family and friends
  • Economic study carried out by the Irish Marine Federation estimated the economic value of the 2009 Regatta at €2.5 million

The dates for the 2021 edition of Ireland's biggest sailing event on Dublin Bay is: 8-11 July 2021. More details here

Dun Laoghaire-Dingle Offshore Race

The biennial Dun Laoghaire to Dingle race is a 320-miles race down the East coast of Ireland, across the south coast and into Dingle harbour in County Kerry. The latest news on the Dun Laoghaire to Dingle Race can be found by clicking on the link here. The race is organised by the National Yacht Club.

The 2021 Race will start from the National Yacht Club on Wednesday 9th, June 2021.

Round Ireland Yacht Race

This is a Wicklow Sailing Club race but in 2013 the Garden County Club made an arrangement that sees see entries berthed at the RIYC in Dun Laoghaire Harbour for scrutineering prior to the biennial 704–mile race start off Wicklow harbour. Larger boats have been unable to berth in the confines of Wicklow harbour, a factor WSC believes has restricted the growth of the Round Ireland fleet. 'It means we can now encourage larger boats that have shown an interest in competing but we have been unable to cater for in Wicklow' harbour, WSC Commodore Peter Shearer told Afloat.ie here. The race also holds a pre-ace launch party at the Royal Irish Yacht Club.

Laser Masters World Championship 2018

  • 301 boats from 25 nations

Laser Radial World Championship 2016

  • 436 competitors from 48 nations

ISAF Youth Worlds 2012

  • The Youth Olympics of Sailing run on behalf of World Sailing in 2012.
  • Two-week event attracting 61 nations, 255 boats, 450 volunteers.
  • Generated 9,000 bed nights and valued at €9 million to the local economy.

The Harbour Police are authorised by the company to police the harbour and to enforce and implement bye-laws within the harbour, and all regulations made by the company in relation to the harbour.

There are four ship/ferry berths in Dun Laoghaire:

  • No 1 berth (East Pier)
  • No 2 berth (east side of Carlisle Pier)
  • No 3 berth (west side of Carlisle Pier)
  • No 4 berth  (St, Michaels Wharf)

Berthing facilities for smaller craft exist in the town's 800-berth marina and on swinging moorings.

© Afloat 2020

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