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Displaying items by tag: Monkstown Bay Sailing Club

Monkstown Bay Sailing Club's ever-popular Laser Frostbite League concluded in Cork Harbour on Saturday afternoon (February 10th).

A cold north-easterly wind and heavy rain were present on the final day of racing. This did not phase the eager competitors in the slightest, and racing commenced as usual at 10:10 am.

Race officer Robbie O’Sullivan and his team laid a course in difficult conditions.

As the sailors launched in good time, it became evident that strong tides, swirling eddies, banks of seaweed and big wind shifts would be the order of business for the morning.

Race one kicked off in a light breeze. Competitors dashed off a heavily port-biased line, only to be stopped dead by a hole of no wind on the starboard lay line. Utilising local knowledge, several sailors tacked through a back eddy to keep making progress. Davy O’Connell of MBSC was the wisest, reaching the windward mark first. Ronan Kenneally followed in second, with Chris Bateman in third. With some tough battles through seaweed and heavy tide swirls, the final leeward mark saw Bateman pull into first, with Fionn Lyden of BSC sailing through to take second place and Kenneally taking third. A few tight-tacking battles later, and this was the finishing order.

Race two was slightly breezier with a course change in place. The racing was incredibly close throughout the fleet. Rob Scallan of MBSC was first around the windward mark having charged in with good speed from the starboard layline.

However, he fell back on the downwind slightly, so by the leeward mark, Bateman had pulled into first with Rob Howe in second. Scallan closed up the gap in third.

By the time the finishing order was decided there had been many position changes. Taking first place was Bateman. A close second was Kenneally having sailed well to come back up through the fleet. Snapping at his heels in third place was Scallan.

Race three brought more wind again and extra laps were added to the course. This saw the sailors doing five laps. Off the start saw Ronan Kenneally pull into first. He remained reasonably unchallenged throughout the race. With two competitors returning the line due to being over early, orders were mixed. Five rounds later saw Kenneally take first place. Paul O’Sullivan of MBSC sailed a stellar race, coming up through the ranks from last to second place at the finish line. In a very close third place behind O’Sullivan was Rob Howe.

That concluded racing for the morning and for 2024’s edition of the Laser Frostbite Series.

Chris Bateman of MBSC won the “Yard of Ale” Trophy. In second place was Ronan Kenneally of MBSC. Fionn Lyden of Baltimore SC was in third place.

Ronan Kenneally second in the 2024 Yard of Ale trophy with Jacqui O'Brien, Commodore of MBSC Photo: Bob BatemanRonan Kenneally second in the 2024 Yard of Ale trophy with Jacqui O'Brien, Commodore of MBSC Photo: Bob Bateman

The prize-giving was held at The Bosun, where lunch and beverages could be enjoyed comfortably. This concluded the first event of what is set to be a fantastic season.

Fionn Lyden finished third  Photo: Bob BatemanFionn Lyden finished third  Photo: Bob Bateman

MBSC issued a big thank you to volunteers such as Robbie O’Sullivan, Emmett O’Sullivan, Dave Doherty, Bob Bateman (Photography), Colin Barry and to all those who helped run the league.

Local dinghy ace Chris Bateman leads the Monkstown Bay Sailing Club Laser Winter League 2024 overall after six races sailed.

Ronan Kenneally lies second after two discards applied with Paul O'Sullivan in third place.

A full tide in Cork Harbour saw MBSC Race Officers Dave Doherty and Robbie O'Sullivan utilise Rafeen Creek for the windward-leeward courses.

Whilst overcast, the penultimate day of racing produced a perfect 12 to 15-knot SW breeze for the ten-boat fleet.

Monkstown Bay Sailing Club Laser Winter League 2024 resultsMonkstown Bay Sailing Club Laser Winter League 2024 results

Racing concludes next Saturday, February 10th.

Monkstown Bay Sailing Club Laser Winter League 2024 Photo Gallery by Bob Bateman

The first competitive sailing of this year in Cork will begin this Saturday at Monkstown Bay when the Cork Harbour club starts its Winter Laser League.

It will be raced on four further Saturdays – January 27, February 3 and February 10. All competitors must be aged 17 or over on the date of the first race.

Entry details are on the club website: mbsc.ie

Also, for Cork Laser sailors, the Irish Laser Class Association (ILCA) has announced its racing calendar for this year, with the first major event to be their Munster Championships, to be sailed at Baltimore on March 30 and 31.

Harry Pritchard emerged as the winner of the Magner trophy for his outstanding performance in the Monkstown Bay Sailing Club St. Stephens Day mixed dinghy race held in Cork Harbour. Pritchard, who was racing his ILCA 7, outclassed his opponents to clinch the top spot in the Christmas race. 

A total of 17 boats participated in the race, including a 505, four fireballs, ILCAS, Fevas and an RS fusion. The course comprised two rounds of a Windward Leeward course in a strong flood tide with light winds.

The race officers Robbie O'Sullivan and Padraig Byrne ensured the event was conducted smoothly and efficiently.

Ewen Barry and Sandy Rimmington racing a Fireball secured second place in the St. Stephens Day Mixed Dinghy RaceEwen Barry and Sandy Rimmington racing a Fireball secured second place in the St. Stephens Day Mixed Dinghy Race

Pritchard's win was well-deserved, given his exceptional performance. Ewen Barry and Sandy Rimmington, who were racing a Fireball, managed to secure second place, while Chris Bateman and Lauren Murphy, also racing a Fireball, finished third.

Bob Bateman's Photo Gallery of the Monkstown Bay Sailing Club St. Stephens Day Mixed Dinghy Race

Day three of the December Fireball Frostbite League was held on Saturday, the 23rd, on Monkstown Bay in Cork Harbour in glorious winter sailing conditions.

A beautiful sunrise set the tone for the morning's racing. The bay was awash with golden light as the first of the competitors began to arrive.

The Fireball numbers in Cork alone have risen from 1 last year to 11 boats based in Cork (9 in Monkstown Bay alone) With numbers continuing to blossom, local promoter Chris Bateman says, "The Fireball is one of the fastest, cheapest and stable boats on the market currently, not to mention one of the most accommodating, enthusiastic classes in Europe". Photo: Bob BatemanThe Fireball numbers in Cork alone have risen from 1 last year to 14 boats based in Cork (9 in Monkstown Bay alone) With numbers continuing to blossom, local promoter Chris Bateman says, "the Fireball is one of the fastest, cheapest and stable boats on the market currently, not to mention one of the most accommodating, enthusiastic classes in Europe". Photo: Bob Bateman

Seven Fireballs were due to arrive despite the proximity to Christmas Day. These numbers held true and in no time the Sandquay became filled with the noises of flapping sails and enthusiastic conversation.

Race officer Robbie O’Sullivan, with assistant Rory Fitzpatrick, set a triangle course with anticipation of a twenty-knot westerly wind. A slow tide was running, adding to the tactical element of the day.

The Fireballs launched in good time, some earlier than others to allow time for a dash around the bay. They provided a colourful sight for the onlookers with their bright spinnakers and shiny hulls throwing white clouds of spray.
The new fleet of Fireballs to Cork has brought in great interest to sailing and no doubt they put on a show that morning!

Ewen Barry and Sandy Rimmington competing in the Fireball Frostbite league at Monkstown Bay Sailing Club Photo: Bob BatemanEwen Barry and Sandy Rimmington competing in the Fireball Frostbite league at Monkstown Bay Sailing Club Photo: Bob Bateman

Race one kicked off cleanly, with Ewen Barry and Sandy Rimmington taking the lead early on.

 Adrian Lee and Tiarnan Brown lead at mark one over Ewen Barry and Sandy Rimmington competing in the Fireball Frostbite league at Monkstown Bay Sailing Club Photo: Bob BatemanAdrian Lee and Tiarnan Brown lead at mark one over Ewen Barry and Sandy Rimmington competing in the Fireball Frostbite league at Monkstown Bay Sailing Club Photo: Bob Bateman

Two rounds of the triangle course created interesting tactical dilemmas, with large wind shifts and a tide increasing in strength as the morning went on. Ewen and Sandy used their fantastic heavy wind speed and took first place ahead of Adrian Lee, sailing with Glandore’s Tiarnan Brown, who finished second.

Adrian Lee and Tiarnan Brown competing in the Fireball Frostbite league at Monkstown Bay Sailing Club Photo: Bob Bateman Adrian Lee and Tiarnan Brown competing in the Fireball Frostbite league at Monkstown Bay Sailing Club Photo: Bob Bateman 

Race two began with a slightly altered course. The fleet leaders fought to the finish line with Ewen and Sandy taking first place. Adrian Lee and Tiarnan Brown followed up in second. League newcomers Lola Kohl sailing with crew James Dwyer sailed a great race and finished in third place.

Bella Waterman and Sean O’Herlihy competing in the Fireball Frostbite league at Monkstown Bay Sailing Club Photo: Bob BatemanBella Waterman and Sean O’Herlihy competing in the Fireball Frostbite league at Monkstown Bay Sailing Club Photo: Bob Bateman

The wind had dropped down for race three. A clean start, and it was Lola Kohl and James Dwyer who pulled into the lead, fending off a competitive fleet more than halfway up the course. However Ewen and Sandy sailed well, catching a wind shift which brought them back into contention. Adrian Lee and Tiarnan Brown were seen catching a fantastic gust on the left side which boosted them into second place.

Niall McAllister and Peter Hayes at speed competing in the Fireball Frostbite league at Monkstown Bay Sailing Club Photo: Bob BatemanNiall McAllister and Peter Hayes at speed competing in the Fireball Frostbite league at Monkstown Bay Sailing Club Photo: Bob Bateman

At the finish line, Ewen Barry and Sandy Rimmington took first place, completing their hat trick scorecard for the day. In second place was Adrian Lee and Tiarnan Brown who had fought hard all morning. Taking third place was Lola Kohl and James Dwyer.

This concluded Saturday’s Frostbite racing, and with that, the fleet headed ashore.

The final race of the December Fireball Frostbite League is on the 26th of December as part of Monkstown Bay Sailing Club’s St Stephens Day celebrations. The First Gun will be at 2 pm.

The clubhouse will be open after racing, with Christmas-themed food and wine prepared for the competitors.

Chris Bateman and Atlee Kohl competing in the Fireball Frostbite league at Monkstown Bay Sailing Club Photo: Bob BatemanChris Bateman and Atlee Kohl competing in the Fireball Frostbite league at Monkstown Bay Sailing Club Photo: Bob Bateman

Pre-Christmas Blast at Monkstown Bay Photo Gallery by Bob Bateman

Veteran sailor Dave O’Connell has been chosen as the Monkstown Bay Sailing Club Sailor of 2023.

Having dominated Class 1 dinghy racing with several league wins during the season, he was given the award at the club's annual laying-up dinner.

Robert O’Leary was chosen as ‘Club Man of the Year’ for his contribution to MBSC during the sailing season.

MBSC Clubman of the year Robert O'Leary with commodore Jacqui O'BrienMBSC Clubman of the year Robert O'Leary with commodore Jacqui O'Brien

Monkstown Bay Sailing Club members, at their annual general meeting on Sunday afternoon in Cork Harbour, elected Jacqui O’Brien to continue as Commodore for another year in office.

Vice-Commodore is Richard Harrington and Rear Commodore Alan Fehily.

The blue painted Monkstown Bay Sailing Club clubhouse will host visitors after racing for the award of prizes The blue painted Monkstown Bay Sailing Club clubhouse in Cork Harbour Photo: Bob Bateman

The Committee is Hon. Treasurer Ewen Barry; Hon. Secretary Sandy O’Brien; Members: Michael O’Brien, Ronan O’Driscoll, Ronan Kenneally, Chris Granby, David Doherty, Brian Dineen, Brendan O’Connell, Andrew Moynihan.

On November 11th Saturday last, the Fireball resurgence continued in Cork as a Frostbite league raced on the waters of Monkstown Bay.

With the class continuing to blossom in Cork, Six competing Fireballs arrived for the second day of a four-week series.

Fireballs racing at Monkstown Bay in Cork HarbourFireballs racing at Monkstown Bay in Cork Harbour Photo: Bob Bateman

Light winds were the order of business for the early hours of Saturday morning. Greeted by a glorious sunrise and brisk November air, the competitors, organisers and spectators arrived in droves. As is always the case with this spectacular class, enthusiasm levels were high.

Niall McAllister and crew Killian of Bantry Bay take first place in race three of day one of the Fireball Frostbites Photo: Bob BatemanNiall McAllister and crew Killian of Bantry Bay take first place in race three of day one of the Fireball Frostbites Photo: Bob Bateman

Fireballs of all different colours brightened up the dinghy park as their keen owners tuned rigs and prepared sails for the morning's racing.

Ethel and Olin Bateman currently second overallEthel and Olin Bateman currently second overall at the MBSC Fireball Frostbites Photo: Bob Bateman

With a starting gun scheduled for 10:30am they lost no time in launching. In keeping with the vibrant theme, a brightly painted Currach became the Cork class committee boat. This was set in place and manned for the day by Robbie O’Sullivan.

Conor Kelly and son Conor fighting for second place on Day one in the Fireball dinghy frostbites racing at Monkstown BayConor Kelly and son Conor fighting for second place on Day one in the Fireball dinghy frostbites racing at Monkstown Bay

A light North Easterly Breeze filled in which was just enough to get race one underway.

It was a fantastic sight to see the Fireballs battling it out on the start line, and at the gun, all got away cleanly. Although new to the fleet, Ewan Barry and crew Sandy Rimmington of MBSC quickly established dominance, leading at the first mark. Adrian Lee of Youghal and crew/league organiser Chris Bateman tacked out into the tide, scraping around in second just in front of the dark horse team of Conor Kelly, racing with his son Conor (junior) on the wire.

Ewan Barry and Sandy Rimmington lead mark 1  in the Fireball dinghy frostbites racing at Monkstown Bay Photo: Bob BatemanEwan Barry and Sandy Rimmington lead mark 1  in the Fireball dinghy frostbites racing at Monkstown Bay Photo: Bob Bateman

A strong tide and relatively short course kept the race short and exciting, with many position changes. In the end the race was won by Ewan and Sandy, followed up by Lee and Bateman in second with the Kelly’s taking third.

Fireball racingFireball racing

Race two brought less wind and more tide. The competitors gave no leeway and the fleet remained tight with many position changes. At the first mark, it was Ewan and Sandy around in first place. They ran downwind into a hole of no breeze while the fleet carried down fair wind. They managed to hold on to their lead, and crossed the line two rounds later to take first place. Lee and Bateman followed in second, with the ever-consistent Kelly team in third.

Race three kicked off in a more consistent breeze, and it was the new Fireball team of Brian Jones and Barry O’Connor who rounded the windward mark in first place. They held this until close to the leeward mark, where a strong wind shift favoured Lee and Bateman. A small battle ensued after this major wind shift, allowing Lee and Bateman to take the lead, with Ewan Barry and Sandy Rimmington in second followed by Jones and O’Connor in third.

Race four brought medium winds, allowing the crews to stretch their legs on the trapeze. The Fireballs accelerated into their natural habitat of upwind planing which made for an exciting final race. Ewan and Sandy quickly regained the lead and held it all the way to the finish line, completing their impressive first day in a Fireball. Taking second were Lee and Bateman, followed by the Kelly’s (also new to Fireballs). The fleet chomped at their heels, making their statement before calling it a day.

Rather than go straight home, punctual racing allowed the sailors to go for a sail around the bay in the increasing breeze. Fireballs tore across the water, putting on a show before heading for home.
This will all continue next week for day three of the Fireball series.

With more boats scheduled to arrive, why not join us? The Fireball is one of the fastest, cheapest and stable boats on the market currently, not to mention one of the most accommodating, enthusiastic classes in Europe.

The numbers in Cork alone have risen from 1 last year to 11 boats based in all of Cork right now (9 in Monkstown Bay alone).

If interested in being a part of the Fireball fleet, trying a boat, selling or buying, call Chris on +353 85 7272382.

If you don’t have access to a phone and want to join the Cork Fireball fleet, racing is every Saturday morning, so come down and have a look!

Published in Fireball

The October dinghy league finished in good weather on Saturday at Monkstown Bay Sailing Club in Cork Harbour with the 505 of helm Ewen Barry and crew John Coakley/Charles Dwyer, overall winners.

Two Laser sailors filled the next positions in the top three – Brendan Dwyer second and David O’Connell third.

Ruby Duggan and Isabelle McCarthy won Class 2 in an RS Feva XL and two of these dinghies were the others in the top three placings – Jack Horgan and Darragh Killeen were second, Oliver and Ronan Kenneally third.

Ruby Duggan and Isabelle McCarthy also won the overall Class Two trophy for the season.

This Saturday, Monkstown will begin hosting the Cork Fireball Open Frostbites series which will be sailed for the month – on November 11, 18 and 25.

First Gun will be at 10.30 a.m. on a three-minute start sequence, the course to be announced on the day for three scheduled races each day in the Monkstown Bay/Lower Harbour area. There is an entry fee of €20 per boat.

Thirteen Class 1 dinghies sailed the penultimate day of league racing at Monkstown Bay Sailing Club in Cork Harbour.

Racing for the season will conclude this Saturday, with prizegiving afterwards in the clubhouse.

Dinghies are the club’s only racing boats and, despite the varying weather patterns this season, there has been strong support. For many sailors, dinghies are the introduction to the sport, so are a vital step into sailing and, often, lead to a lifetime in the sport.

With final league racing scheduled for this Saturday, the Class 1fleet is led by the 505 crew of Ewen Barry, Charles Dwyer, John Coakley on 5 points, seven clear of second-placed Laser sailor, Brendan Dwyer on 12. Veteran Laser sailor, Davy O’Connell, who has been a monthly winner during the season, is third on 21 points.

In Class 2 the leader is Olin Bateman, sailing a Laser 4.7 and looking the certain overall winner on 5 points, well clear of second-placed Ethel Bateman in another Laser 4.7 on 25. Third is the RS Feva XL of Isobelle Clarke Waterman and Conor Donald Kelly on 56 points.

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Dun Laoghaire Harbour Information

Dun Laoghaire Harbour is the second port for Dublin and is located on the south shore of Dublin Bay. Marine uses for this 200-year-old man-made harbour have changed over its lifetime. Originally built as a port of refuge for sailing ships entering the narrow channel at Dublin Port, the harbour has had a continuous ferry link with Wales, and this was the principal activity of the harbour until the service stopped in 2015. In all this time, however, one thing has remained constant, and that is the popularity of sailing and boating from the port, making it Ireland's marine leisure capital with a harbour fleet of between 1,200 -1,600 pleasure craft based at the country's largest marina (800 berths) and its four waterfront yacht clubs.

Dun Laoghaire Harbour Bye-Laws

Download the bye-laws on this link here

FAQs

A live stream Dublin Bay webcam showing Dun Laoghaire Harbour entrance and East Pier is here

Dun Laoghaire is a Dublin suburb situated on the south side of Dublin Bay, approximately, 15km from Dublin city centre.

The east and west piers of the harbour are each of 1 kilometre (0.62 miles) long.

The harbour entrance is 232 metres (761 ft) across from East to West Pier.

  • Public Boatyard
  • Public slipway
  • Public Marina

23 clubs, 14 activity providers and eight state-related organisations operate from Dun Laoghaire Harbour that facilitates a full range of sports - Sailing, Rowing, Diving, Windsurfing, Angling, Canoeing, Swimming, Triathlon, Powerboating, Kayaking and Paddleboarding. Participants include members of the public, club members, tourists, disabled, disadvantaged, event competitors, schools, youth groups and college students.

  • Commissioners of Irish Lights
  • Dun Laoghaire Marina
  • MGM Boats & Boatyard
  • Coastguard
  • Naval Service Reserve
  • Royal National Lifeboat Institution
  • Marine Activity Centre
  • Rowing clubs
  • Yachting and Sailing Clubs
  • Sailing Schools
  • Irish Olympic Sailing Team
  • Chandlery & Boat Supply Stores

The east and west granite-built piers of Dun Laoghaire harbour are each of one kilometre (0.62 mi) long and enclose an area of 250 acres (1.0 km2) with the harbour entrance being 232 metres (761 ft) in width.

In 2018, the ownership of the great granite was transferred in its entirety to Dun Laoghaire Rathdown County Council who now operate and manage the harbour. Prior to that, the harbour was operated by The Dun Laoghaire Harbour Company, a state company, dissolved in 2018 under the Ports Act.

  • 1817 - Construction of the East Pier to a design by John Rennie began in 1817 with Earl Whitworth Lord Lieutenant of Ireland laying the first stone.
  • 1820 - Rennie had concerns a single pier would be subject to silting, and by 1820 gained support for the construction of the West pier to begin shortly afterwards. When King George IV left Ireland from the harbour in 1820, Dunleary was renamed Kingstown, a name that was to remain in use for nearly 100 years. The harbour was named the Royal Harbour of George the Fourth which seems not to have remained for so long.
  • 1824 - saw over 3,000 boats shelter in the partially completed harbour, but it also saw the beginning of operations off the North Wall which alleviated many of the issues ships were having accessing Dublin Port.
  • 1826 - Kingstown harbour gained the important mail packet service which at the time was under the stewardship of the Admiralty with a wharf completed on the East Pier in the following year. The service was transferred from Howth whose harbour had suffered from silting and the need for frequent dredging.
  • 1831 - Royal Irish Yacht Club founded
  • 1837 - saw the creation of Victoria Wharf, since renamed St. Michael's Wharf with the D&KR extended and a new terminus created convenient to the wharf.[8] The extended line had cut a chord across the old harbour with the landward pool so created later filled in.
  • 1838 - Royal St George Yacht Club founded
  • 1842 - By this time the largest man-made harbour in Western Europe had been completed with the construction of the East Pier lighthouse.
  • 1855 - The harbour was further enhanced by the completion of Traders Wharf in 1855 and Carlisle Pier in 1856. The mid-1850s also saw the completion of the West Pier lighthouse. The railway was connected to Bray in 1856
  • 1871 - National Yacht Club founded
  • 1884 - Dublin Bay Sailing Club founded
  • 1918 - The Mailboat, “The RMS Leinster” sailed out of Dún Laoghaire with 685 people on board. 22 were post office workers sorting the mail; 70 were crew and the vast majority of the passengers were soldiers returning to the battlefields of World War I. The ship was torpedoed by a German U-boat near the Kish lighthouse killing many of those onboard.
  • 1920 - Kingstown reverted to the name Dún Laoghaire in 1920 and in 1924 the harbour was officially renamed "Dun Laoghaire Harbour"
  • 1944 - a diaphone fog signal was installed at the East Pier
  • 1965 - Dun Laoghaire Motor Yacht Club founded
  • 1968 - The East Pier lighthouse station switched from vapourised paraffin to electricity, and became unmanned. The new candle-power was 226,000
  • 1977- A flying boat landed in Dun Laoghaire Harbour, one of the most unusual visitors
  • 1978 - Irish National Sailing School founded
  • 1934 - saw the Dublin and Kingstown Railway begin operations from their terminus at Westland Row to a terminus at the West Pier which began at the old harbour
  • 2001 - Dun Laoghaire Marina opens with 500 berths
  • 2015 - Ferry services cease bringing to an end a 200-year continuous link with Wales.
  • 2017- Bicentenary celebrations and time capsule laid.
  • 2018 - Dun Laoghaire Harbour Company dissolved, the harbour is transferred into the hands of Dun Laoghaire Rathdown County Council

From East pier to West Pier the waterfront clubs are:

  • National Yacht Club. Read latest NYC news here
  • Royal St. George Yacht Club. Read latest RSTGYC news here
  • Royal Irish Yacht Club. Read latest RIYC news here
  • Dun Laoghaire Motor Yacht Club. Read latest DMYC news here

 

The umbrella organisation that organises weekly racing in summer and winter on Dublin Bay for all the yacht clubs is Dublin Bay Sailing Club. It has no clubhouse of its own but operates through the clubs with two x Committee vessels and a starters hut on the West Pier. Read the latest DBSC news here.

The sailing community is a key stakeholder in Dún Laoghaire. The clubs attract many visitors from home and abroad and attract major international sailing events to the harbour.

 

Dun Laoghaire Regatta

Dun Laoghaire's biennial town regatta was started in 2005 as a joint cooperation by the town's major yacht clubs. It was an immediate success and is now in its eighth edition and has become Ireland's biggest sailing event. The combined club's regatta is held in the first week of July.

  • Attracts 500 boats and more from overseas and around the country
  • Four-day championship involving 2,500 sailors with supporting family and friends
  • Economic study carried out by the Irish Marine Federation estimated the economic value of the 2009 Regatta at €2.5 million

The dates for the 2021 edition of Ireland's biggest sailing event on Dublin Bay is: 8-11 July 2021. More details here

Dun Laoghaire-Dingle Offshore Race

The biennial Dun Laoghaire to Dingle race is a 320-miles race down the East coast of Ireland, across the south coast and into Dingle harbour in County Kerry. The latest news on the Dun Laoghaire to Dingle Race can be found by clicking on the link here. The race is organised by the National Yacht Club.

The 2021 Race will start from the National Yacht Club on Wednesday 9th, June 2021.

Round Ireland Yacht Race

This is a Wicklow Sailing Club race but in 2013 the Garden County Club made an arrangement that sees see entries berthed at the RIYC in Dun Laoghaire Harbour for scrutineering prior to the biennial 704–mile race start off Wicklow harbour. Larger boats have been unable to berth in the confines of Wicklow harbour, a factor WSC believes has restricted the growth of the Round Ireland fleet. 'It means we can now encourage larger boats that have shown an interest in competing but we have been unable to cater for in Wicklow' harbour, WSC Commodore Peter Shearer told Afloat.ie here. The race also holds a pre-ace launch party at the Royal Irish Yacht Club.

Laser Masters World Championship 2018

  • 301 boats from 25 nations

Laser Radial World Championship 2016

  • 436 competitors from 48 nations

ISAF Youth Worlds 2012

  • The Youth Olympics of Sailing run on behalf of World Sailing in 2012.
  • Two-week event attracting 61 nations, 255 boats, 450 volunteers.
  • Generated 9,000 bed nights and valued at €9 million to the local economy.

The Harbour Police are authorised by the company to police the harbour and to enforce and implement bye-laws within the harbour, and all regulations made by the company in relation to the harbour.

There are four ship/ferry berths in Dun Laoghaire:

  • No 1 berth (East Pier)
  • No 2 berth (east side of Carlisle Pier)
  • No 3 berth (west side of Carlisle Pier)
  • No 4 berth  (St, Michaels Wharf)

Berthing facilities for smaller craft exist in the town's 800-berth marina and on swinging moorings.

© Afloat 2020