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Displaying items by tag: Navigation

Dublin Bay Sailing Club in conjunction with Dublin Port will present a navigation talk at the next ‘Speaker Supper’ on Friday 21 February.

Patrick Cafferky will give the talk on ‘Marine and Navigation Safety from a Marine Pilot’s Perspective’ in the National Yacht Club dining room from 8.30pm, following supper at 7.30pm sharp.

The meal is €25 a head and all waterfront clubs are welcome to attend. To book please contact Tim at [email protected], Louise or Kristyna at [email protected] or phone 01 280 5725.

Published in DBSC

#HowToSail - Next month Howth Yacht Club will host a two-day course on essential navigation and seamanship for cruising in coastal waters.

Run on Saturday 13 and Sunday 14 October, the course is touted as the ideal introduction to the essential knowledge required to plan and safely undertake short cruising passages in coastal waters.

The "concise yet highly informative" course is geared towards skippers and crew who are new to cruising, but is equally suitable for sailing yachts, motorboats, RIBs, divers and sea anglers.

The course will include:

  • Charts and chart work
  • Safety
  • Navigation buoys and lights
  • ‘Rules of the Road’
  • Tides
  • Weather
  • Passage planning and pilotage
  • Modern methods of electronic navigation

Presented by David Jerrard of Sea-Craft, the course runs from 9.30am to 5.30pm each day in HYC. The course fee is €120 which includes the full course pack and documentation.

The course is open to both club members and non-members so feel free to bring along a friend or colleague.

For more details and booking information, contact [email protected] or phone Sea-Craft at 01 286 3362 anytime.

Published in Howth YC
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The deck lights used by cruise ships have been identified as a potential navigation risk at sea at night, in the investigation of a complaint by a yacht Skipper following an encounter with a cruise vessel, writes Tom MacSweeney.

It was investigated by the CHIRP Maritime organisation, the British (UK) Confidential Reporting Programme for Maritime incidents. The aim of CHIRP is to contribute to the enhancement of maritime safety worldwide. It says that it provides “a totally independent confidential (not anonymous) reporting system for all individuals employed in the maritime industry. It provides a similar aviation system.

The yacht Skipper reported to CHRIP that it was difficult to distinguish navigation lights amongst other deck lights:

“I was under sail in a Southerly direction when I saw the lights of another vessel off my starboard bow.” Endeavouring to keep clear “the relative tracks didn’t seem, to make sense if I was seeing what I thought was a green starboard navigation light.”

The vessel was a cruise ship which crossed a mile ahead, going from East to West.

“I should therefore, have been able to see the port navigation light, but could not convince myself there was a red light amongst the multitude of other lights visible on the cruise liner.”

As the vessels were both a safe distance from each other, there was no harm, but the amount of coloured lights on cruise ships has been identified as an issue needing attention.

The yacht Skipper said: “The Collision Regulations specify the minimum visibility of navigation lights. However, the impact of other bright lights, obscuring the navigation lights, is not appreciated. Vessels should ensure that their navigation lights are bright enough to be seen against the background of all their other lights and avoid using coloured deck lights where this can cause confusion. Very bright deck working lights obscuring navigation lights are often an issue on fishing boats as well.”

The CHIRP investigation comment said: “The Maritime Advisory Board highlighted the importance of taking a series of compass bearings in order to determine whether a risk of collision exists Navigation light visibility, irrespective of other lighting, must comply with COL REGS.

“They queried why classification societies permit these designs where visibility is obscured. Technology exists whereby deck lighting may be adequately shaded – permitting safe movement on board, yet not obscuring regulatory lights. The quality of lights bulbs used is another possible consideration. Take LED for example – are approved suppliers holding the introduction of these back due to a lack of any requirement in COLREGS?”

Published in Cruise Liners
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#InlandWaters - Waterways Ireland advises masters and users of the Shannon Navigation that a new green conical navigation aid has been placed north of Inch Macdermot Island in Lough Ree between the green perch and the green can buoy, as shown on the guide above.

Published in Inland Waterways

#Offshore - Just in time for the release of Disney’s new seafaring adventure Moana comes this National Geographic profile of a team of sailors recreating the incredible navigations of Polynesian boats that inspired the animated film.

The crew of the Hōkūle‘a sail the ocean with nothing but the sun and the stars to guide them — even watches are banned.

And the Hawaiian team have been doing it since the mid 1970s, on a mission to prove their Polynesian ancestors were master navigators of the vast expanse of the Pacific.

They’ve since rekindled a long-lost seafaring tradition across the Polynesian islands, and have set their sights on completing an audacious 60,000-nautical-mile round-the-world voyage that they began in 2013, all on an open-deck double-hulled voyaging canoe.

National Geographic has more on the story HERE.

Published in Offshore
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#MarineNotice - Marine Notice No 4 of 2016 advises of the risks inherent in the use of unlicensed electronic navigation systems and cautions against their use.

Unlicensed software and electronic charts may contain errors, resulting in inaccuracies in displayed information and indicated vessel position. Such unlicensed software should not be used for navigation purposes.

Vessel operators are reminded of the requirement to carry suitable nautical instruments and adequate and up-to-date charts for their intended voyages. All equipment fitted in compliance with shipborne navigational equipment regulations should be type approved.

The installation and use of unlicensed navigational systems and software on-board commercial vessels may invalidate a vessel’s certification and may also lead to the cancelation of a vessel’s certificates.

If in doubt, vessel owners/operators should confirm with their suppliers that their software is up to date and licensed.

Published in Marine Warning

#deadcow – Round–the–World Yachtsman and Afloat.ie reader Pat Murphy says he enjoyed our story about the weekend rescue of a cow by the RNLI in Waterford. Unfortunately, Pat and his wife Olivia related a tale where they came across another cow in the same area (above) that was not so lucky. 'We came across him/her about six miles south of Hook Head while on passage from Waterford to Padstow in Cornwall on August Monday last in our yacht Aldebaran', Pat told Afloat.ie.

'I reported it to Rosslare Coastguard Radio as a navigational hazard. It was so bloated I think that to make contact with it could result in a not very nice shower!' he said.

Published in Cruising
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#InlandWaters - Despite the threat of floods amid the current weather warning, the recent extended period of dry weather has meant that water levels in Ireland's navigable inland waterways are lower than normal for this time of year.

Where water levels fall below normal summer levels, Waterways Ireland says masters should be aware that their vessels may be at risk of grounding, particularly deep drafted vessels.

To reduce this risk, masters should navigate where possible on or near the centreline of the channel and also avoid short cutting in dog-legged channels and navigating too close to navigation markers.

Proceeding at a slow speed will also reduce 'squat' effect, ie where the vessel tends to sit lower in the water as a consequence of higher speed.

Low water levels will also impact on slipways, with reduced slipway length available under the water surface and the possibility of launching trailers dropping off the end of the concrete apron onto the river/lake bed and causing damage to trailer, outboard motor or boat.

More slipway surface will also be susceptible to weed growth requiring care while engaged in launching boats.

Very dry riverbanks are more susceptible to erosion from vessel wash. Waterways Ireland asks masters to ensure they adhere to the speed limits and maintain a reduced wash.

Where appropriate by maximising on the number of vessels in a lock the total volume of water moving downstream is decreased. This also reduces the volume of water used.

Waterways Ireland asks users to be patient and wait for other boaters to share the lock rather than using locks for single passages.

Masters are also requested to make sure lock cycles are used for vessels travelling each way. Each lock cycle should take boats both up and down stream. All sluice gates and paddles should be shut when leaving a lock.

In addition, masters are reminded not to leave taps running at watering points or service blocks in the interest of water conservation.

Published in Inland Waterways
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#HowToNavigate - A new revised edition of bestselling sailing guide Learn to Navigate continues its reputation as the accessible, no-nonsense guide for every boater.

Basil Mosenthal and Barry Pickthall take the reader through every step, from reading charts to understanding tides and much more, giving even novice sailors a sound practical basis in navigation.

Learn to Navigate is available now via Amazon and all good nautical booksellers.

Published in Book Review
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#Navigation - The United States' National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) has announced that it will cease publication of paper nautical charts in six months' time, according to Sail magazine.

Since the first maps charting the US coastline were published in the 1860s, the NOAA's Office of Coast Survey has been producing accurate and highly detailed charts to help all kinds of mariners find safe passage through American waters, from fishing vessels to merchant ships to cruising yachts.

But with the majority of ocean-goers now relying on GPS and other modern technologies, the use of paper nautical charts was seen as falling by the wayside by the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), which took over the production of US charts in 1999.

Yet while printed nautical charts may now become the preserve of specialised cartographers like Bobby Nash, who designed a special classic chart for the Volvo Ocean Race finale in Galway last year, the NOAA will still be providing its ocean maps by electronic means via data or high-res PDFs.

Sail magazine has more on the story HERE.

Published in Cruising
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Dun Laoghaire Harbour Information

Dun Laoghaire Harbour is the second port for Dublin and is located on the south shore of Dublin Bay. Marine uses for this 200-year-old man-made harbour have changed over its lifetime. Originally built as a port of refuge for sailing ships entering the narrow channel at Dublin Port, the harbour has had a continuous ferry link with Wales and this was the principal activity of the harbour until the service stopped in 2015. In all this time, however, one thing has remained constant and that is the popularity for sailing and boating from the port, making it Ireland's marine leisure capital with a harbour fleet of over 1,200-1.600 pleasure craft.

Dun Laoghaire Harbour Bye-Laws

Download the bye-laws on this link here

FAQs

A live stream Dublin Bay webcam showing Dun Laoghaire Harbour entrance and East Pier is here

Dun Laoghaire is a Dublin suburb situated on the south side of Dublin Bay, approximately, 15km from Dublin city centre.

The east and west piers of the harbour are each of 1 kilometre (0.62 miles) long.

The harbour entrance is 232 metres (761 ft) across from East to West Pier.

  • Public Boatyard
  • Public slipway
  • Public Marina

23 clubs, 14 activity providers and eight state-related organisations operate from Dun Laoghaire Harbour that facilitates a full range of sports - Sailing, Rowing, Diving, Windsurfing, Angling, Canoeing, Swimming, Triathlon, Powerboating, Kayaking and Paddleboarding. Participants include members of the public, club members, tourists, disabled, disadvantaged, event competitors, schools, youth groups and college students.

  • Commissioners of Irish Lights
  • Dun Laoghaire Marina
  • MGM Boats & Boatyard
  • Coastguard
  • Naval Service Reserve
  • Royal National Lifeboat Institution
  • Marine Activity Centre
  • Rowing clubs
  • Yachting and Sailing Clubs
  • Sailing Schools
  • Irish Olympic Sailing Team
  • Chandlery & Boat Supply Stores

The east and west granite-built piers of Dun Laoghaire harbour are each of one kilometre (0.62 mi) long and enclose an area of 250 acres (1.0 km2) with the harbour entrance being 232 metres (761 ft) in width.

In 2018, the ownership of the great granite was transferred in its entirety to Dun Laoghaire Rathdown County Council who now operate and manage the harbour. Prior to that, the harbour was operated by The Dun Laoghaire Harbour Company, a state company, dissolved in 2018 under the Ports Act.

  • 1817 - Construction of the East Pier to a design by John Rennie began in 1817 with Earl Whitworth Lord Lieutenant of Ireland laying the first stone.
  • 1820 - Rennie had concerns a single pier would be subject to silting, and by 1820 gained support for the construction of the West pier to begin shortly afterwards. When King George IV left Ireland from the harbour in 1820, Dunleary was renamed Kingstown, a name that was to remain in use for nearly 100 years. The harbour was named the Royal Harbour of George the Fourth which seems not to have remained for so long.
  • 1824 - saw over 3,000 boats shelter in the partially completed harbour, but it also saw the beginning of operations off the North Wall which alleviated many of the issues ships were having accessing Dublin Port.
  • 1826 - Kingstown harbour gained the important mail packet service which at the time was under the stewardship of the Admiralty with a wharf completed on the East Pier in the following year. The service was transferred from Howth whose harbour had suffered from silting and the need for frequent dredging.
  • 1831 - Royal Irish Yacht Club founded
  • 1837 - saw the creation of Victoria Wharf, since renamed St. Michael's Wharf with the D&KR extended and a new terminus created convenient to the wharf.[8] The extended line had cut a chord across the old harbour with the landward pool so created later filled in.
  • 1838 - Royal St George Yacht Club founded
  • 1842 - By this time the largest man-made harbour in Western Europe had been completed with the construction of the East Pier lighthouse.
  • 1855 - The harbour was further enhanced by the completion of Traders Wharf in 1855 and Carlisle Pier in 1856. The mid-1850s also saw the completion of the West Pier lighthouse. The railway was connected to Bray in 1856
  • 1871 - National Yacht Club founded
  • 1884 - Dublin Bay Sailing Club founded
  • 1918 - The Mailboat, “The RMS Leinster” sailed out of Dún Laoghaire with 685 people on board. 22 were post office workers sorting the mail; 70 were crew and the vast majority of the passengers were soldiers returning to the battlefields of World War I. The ship was torpedoed by a German U-boat near the Kish lighthouse killing many of those onboard.
  • 1920 - Kingstown reverted to the name Dún Laoghaire in 1920 and in 1924 the harbour was officially renamed "Dun Laoghaire Harbour"
  • 1944 - a diaphone fog signal was installed at the East Pier
  • 1965 - Dun Laoghaire Motor Yacht Club founded
  • 1968 - The East Pier lighthouse station switched from vapourised paraffin to electricity, and became unmanned. The new candle-power was 226,000
  • 1977- A flying boat landed in Dun Laoghaire Harbour, one of the most unusual visitors
  • 1978 - Irish National Sailing School founded
  • 1934 - saw the Dublin and Kingstown Railway begin operations from their terminus at Westland Row to a terminus at the West Pier which began at the old harbour
  • 2001 - Dun Laoghaire Marina opens with 500 berths
  • 2015 - Ferry services cease bringing to an end a 200-year continuous link with Wales.
  • 2017- Bicentenary celebrations and time capsule laid.
  • 2018 - Dun Laoghaire Harbour Company dissolved, the harbour is transferred into the hands of Dun Laoghaire Rathdown County Council

From East pier to West Pier the waterfront clubs are:

  • National Yacht Club. Read latest NYC news here
  • Royal St. George Yacht Club. Read latest RSTGYC news here
  • Royal Irish Yacht Club. Read latest RIYC news here
  • Dun Laoghaire Motor Yacht Club. Read latest DMYC news here

 

The umbrella organisation that organises weekly racing in summer and winter on Dublin Bay for all the yacht clubs is Dublin Bay Sailing Club. It has no clubhouse of its own but operates through the clubs with two x Committee vessels and a starters hut on the West Pier. Read the latest DBSC news here.

The sailing community is a key stakeholder in Dún Laoghaire. The clubs attract many visitors from home and abroad and attract major international sailing events to the harbour.

 

Dun Laoghaire Regatta

Dun Laoghaire's biennial town regatta was started in 2005 as a joint cooperation by the town's major yacht clubs. It was an immediate success and is now in its eighth edition and has become Ireland's biggest sailing event. The combined club's regatta is held in the first week of July.

  • Attracts 500 boats and more from overseas and around the country
  • Four-day championship involving 2,500 sailors with supporting family and friends
  • Economic study carried out by the Irish Marine Federation estimated the economic value of the 2009 Regatta at €2.5 million

The dates for the 2021 edition of Ireland's biggest sailing event on Dublin Bay is: 8-11 July 2021. More details here

Dun Laoghaire-Dingle Offshore Race

The biennial Dun Laoghaire to Dingle race is a 320-miles race down the East coast of Ireland, across the south coast and into Dingle harbour in County Kerry. The latest news on the Dun Laoghaire to Dingle Race can be found by clicking on the link here. The race is organised by the National Yacht Club.

The 2021 Race will start from the National Yacht Club on Wednesday 9th, June 2021.

Round Ireland Yacht Race

This is a Wicklow Sailing Club race but in 2013 the Garden County Club made an arrangement that sees see entries berthed at the RIYC in Dun Laoghaire Harbour for scrutineering prior to the biennial 704–mile race start off Wicklow harbour. Larger boats have been unable to berth in the confines of Wicklow harbour, a factor WSC believes has restricted the growth of the Round Ireland fleet. 'It means we can now encourage larger boats that have shown an interest in competing but we have been unable to cater for in Wicklow' harbour, WSC Commodore Peter Shearer told Afloat.ie here. The race also holds a pre-ace launch party at the Royal Irish Yacht Club.

Laser Masters World Championship 2018

  • 301 boats from 25 nations

Laser Radial World Championship 2016

  • 436 competitors from 48 nations

ISAF Youth Worlds 2012

  • The Youth Olympics of Sailing run on behalf of World Sailing in 2012.
  • Two-week event attracting 61 nations, 255 boats, 450 volunteers.
  • Generated 9,000 bed nights and valued at €9 million to the local economy.

The Harbour Police are authorised by the company to police the harbour and to enforce and implement bye-laws within the harbour, and all regulations made by the company in relation to the harbour.

There are four ship/ferry berths in Dun Laoghaire:

  • No 1 berth (East Pier)
  • No 2 berth (east side of Carlisle Pier)
  • No 3 berth (west side of Carlisle Pier)
  • No 4 berth  (St, Michaels Wharf)

Berthing facilities for smaller craft exist in the town's 800-berth marina and on swinging moorings.

© Afloat 2020

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