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Displaying items by tag: Port of New Ross

On the coastal narrow road to Hook Lighthouse in Co. Wexford was lined with sea foam as cars arrived on New Year’s Day from 7.30 a.m. for a ceremony that dates back to 1687.

An outcrop of rock behind the 800-year-old Hook Lighthouse was the destination for the Dunbrody Archers, New Ross Municipal District officials and some curious onlookers, all braving the cold to witness a spectacular start to 2022.

The tradition dates from 1687 when the mayor and the corporation of New Ross Town Council claimed their authority over the waters by travelling to Hook and shooting an arrow into the sea from Hook Head Lighthouse.

The Mayor of New Ross, casting the arrow into the sea, symbolises the port of New Ross’s authority over the estuary of the Barrow and the Suir all the way down to Hook Head.

More from the New Ross Standard on the event from the south-east.  

Published in Coastal Notes

The Port of New Ross will not be able to reopen to shipping traffic on the scale it was hoped this month due to a delay in completing health and safety works.

Executive scientist with Wexford County Council Brendan Cooney said the taking in charge process of New Ross Pier/Port is ongoing.

Speaking at the municipal council meeting, Mr Cooney said health and safety standards are being looked at and a new harbourmaster is being hired.

Mr Cooney said he is hopeful the port can reopen in the next few weeks.

Cllr John Fleming said he is aware there are problems with navigational equipment in the port.

More here from the New Ross Standard on the south-east inland port on the banks of the Barrow.

Published in Irish Ports

New Ross Standard reports on the handing over of the chains of municipal council power was a mere formality (last) Monday as Fianna Fáil Cllr Michael Whelan was voted in as cathaoirleach for the second time, two days after his party leader was named Taoiseach of a historic coalition.

Taking over from former chairman Cllr John Fleming, who held the role for two consecutive years, the Ballycullane man said it was a proud day for him and for his family.

Cllr Whelan thanked Cllr Fleming for his year in the chair, He said: 'Even though the world has changed very much from where were a few months ago, there are still ongoing events that we should be excited about in the New Ross municipal. Although we can expect the tightening of belts at all levels from national to council level I will make sure the New Ross town and district gets it's fair share,' sounding a note of measured optimism.

He said some exciting projects are in the pipeline which will help with the growth of our town and district.

'The removal of the oil tanks on the entrance into town will improve the look at this entrance point but should also give the opportunity for some kind of development in this area. The High Hill project should be completed in the coming year and this will be a welcome improvement and attraction to that end of town. We will also have the link from the Greenway which I hope will bring New Ross many new exciting opportunities.

We can also promote more along the Norman Way and help re-energise the tourism industry post Covid. We, in this district, are steeped in Norman heritage and have many attractions from Tintern to the Hook Head [lighthouse] and back to the town of New Ross. We also have taken on the Port of New Ross in the last year and have plans to develop the Quay to bring in tours from Waterford initially, but who knows where that could grow to.'

For more on the Co. Wexford town which is also Ireland's most inland port located on the River Barrow click here.

Published in Irish Ports

At the historic Port of New Ross shipping will soon be run by Belview Port in Waterford, in a controversial move planned by Wexford County Council.

As the New Ross Standard reports, the Director of Services for Economic Development Tony Larkin made the announcement at the first meeting of the new Wexford County Council term on Friday.

In an update to councillors ahead of the imminent transfer of the port from the state to Wexford County Council, Mr Larkin said: 'We are taking over the operation of the port. We have been in due diligence for two years.'

Mr Larkin said he was informed last week that the takeover process has been completed, save for three ministers signing the document which will formally allow the transfer.

'The process of having the ministers sign it has now commenced. Immediately upon transfer all assets and staff will transfer to us and we will have responsibility as the port authority. We are not in the shipping business. We are in discussions with the Port of Waterford at Belview about them acting as our agents managing the shipping for a fee.'

To read further comments from Mr Larkin and more click here. 

Published in Irish Ports

#InlandWaterways - The longest bridge in Ireland will finally be named in a fortnight's time after councillors in Piltown and New Ross voted by a small majority last week in favour of the Rose Fitzgerald Kennedy name at separate council meetings.

Both New Ross and Piltown Municipal District Councils met last week reports The NewRoss Standard as the long-running saga of what to call the new bridge (see previous coverage) took up considerable time at both meetings.

In New Ross, Cllr Michael Sheehan went against his colleagues and opted for the William Marshal Bridge, with the seven other councillors voting for the Rose Fitzgerald Kennedy Bridge.

Over in Piltown, five out of the six sitting councillors voted for the Pink Rock Bridge. However, the fact that a single councillor in Piltown voted in favour of Rose Fitzgerald Kennedy means that, as it stands, the vote is at 8-6 in favour of naming the 887m bridge after John F Kennedy's mother.

New Ross and Piltown councillors will meet together on October 3 at the Rhu Gleen Hotel in Slieverue, where the name will be voted on for a final time. If all 14 councillors from New Ross and Piltown vote as per last week, the iconic bridge will officially be named the Rose Fitzgerald Kennedy Bridge, ending a two-year saga over what to call the impressive structure.

For further reading on the new bridge (click here).

Afloat adds that the structure is located downriver of the Port of New Ross on the River Barrow, but sited before the disused Barrow Bridge which carried the Waterford City-Rosslare Harbour stretch of the Limerick railway line. This smaller section of the railway route line however closed in 2010.   

The Barrow Bridge however remains in use albeit for the purposes of permitting shipping traffic to access New Ross. The bridge features a swing-bridge section that pivots to allow ships with up to 6,000 tonnes to transit the bridge and continue navigating upriver.   

Published in Inland Waterways

#InlandWaterways - The scale of the New Ross bypass project for the layperson is as dizzying as its bridge over the River Barrow is going to be high.

For starters, the Killkenny People writes the scheme is 26 years in the making - from its humble beginnings in Kilkenny and Wexford County Development Plans in 1993 and 1994 for an additional river crossing around New Ross.

So to begin with, getting the project over the line took decades in terms of route selection, bridge options, an oral hearing, scheme approval, design, Compulsory Purchase Orders, tendering and all that an infrastructural development of this size entails.

Then there’s the task constructing 13.6km of dual carriageway which will boast Ireland’s longest bridge once it is completed.

For further reading on this impressive project, click here. 

Published in Inland Waterways

#TerminalSite - The Port of New Ross on the River Barrow, has been a hub for dry and liquid bulk traffic and project cargoes for many years. In 2015, total trade through the Co. Wexford port exceeded 286,000 tonnes.

In order to optimise the use of existing port infrastructure, the port company wishes to dispose of a terminal within the port estate, which is situated in the townland of Marshmeadows, downriver of New Ross.

On behalf of the port company, the Marine Institute is inviting expressions of interest in acquiring the facility. The terminal comprises a jetty and adjoining lands measuring approximately 2 hectares.

Published in Ports & Shipping

#RIVER FESTIVAL – The inland port of New Ross,Co. Wexford, is to where the Celtic River Festival is to take place over next weekend (25-26 Aug).

The festival has an action packed programme to entertain with plenty of fun-filled activities for all to enjoy. The events are a cruiser treasure hunt, Viking longboat trips, cot-racing, music sessions, Viking camp and medieval fair, a kids workshop and sea scout camp and archery.

For further details visit their facebook page by clicking HERE

Published in Maritime Festivals

Dun Laoghaire Harbour Information

Dun Laoghaire Harbour is the second port for Dublin and is located on the south shore of Dublin Bay. Marine uses for this 200-year-old man-made harbour have changed over its lifetime. Originally built as a port of refuge for sailing ships entering the narrow channel at Dublin Port, the harbour has had a continuous ferry link with Wales and this was the principal activity of the harbour until the service stopped in 2015. In all this time, however, one thing has remained constant and that is the popularity for sailing and boating from the port, making it Ireland's marine leisure capital with a harbour fleet of over 1,200-1.600 pleasure craft.

Dun Laoghaire Harbour Bye-Laws

Download the bye-laws on this link here

FAQs

A live stream Dublin Bay webcam showing Dun Laoghaire Harbour entrance and East Pier is here

Dun Laoghaire is a Dublin suburb situated on the south side of Dublin Bay, approximately, 15km from Dublin city centre.

The east and west piers of the harbour are each of 1 kilometre (0.62 miles) long.

The harbour entrance is 232 metres (761 ft) across from East to West Pier.

  • Public Boatyard
  • Public slipway
  • Public Marina

23 clubs, 14 activity providers and eight state-related organisations operate from Dun Laoghaire Harbour that facilitates a full range of sports - Sailing, Rowing, Diving, Windsurfing, Angling, Canoeing, Swimming, Triathlon, Powerboating, Kayaking and Paddleboarding. Participants include members of the public, club members, tourists, disabled, disadvantaged, event competitors, schools, youth groups and college students.

  • Commissioners of Irish Lights
  • Dun Laoghaire Marina
  • MGM Boats & Boatyard
  • Coastguard
  • Naval Service Reserve
  • Royal National Lifeboat Institution
  • Marine Activity Centre
  • Rowing clubs
  • Yachting and Sailing Clubs
  • Sailing Schools
  • Irish Olympic Sailing Team
  • Chandlery & Boat Supply Stores

The east and west granite-built piers of Dun Laoghaire harbour are each of one kilometre (0.62 mi) long and enclose an area of 250 acres (1.0 km2) with the harbour entrance being 232 metres (761 ft) in width.

In 2018, the ownership of the great granite was transferred in its entirety to Dun Laoghaire Rathdown County Council who now operate and manage the harbour. Prior to that, the harbour was operated by The Dun Laoghaire Harbour Company, a state company, dissolved in 2018 under the Ports Act.

  • 1817 - Construction of the East Pier to a design by John Rennie began in 1817 with Earl Whitworth Lord Lieutenant of Ireland laying the first stone.
  • 1820 - Rennie had concerns a single pier would be subject to silting, and by 1820 gained support for the construction of the West pier to begin shortly afterwards. When King George IV left Ireland from the harbour in 1820, Dunleary was renamed Kingstown, a name that was to remain in use for nearly 100 years. The harbour was named the Royal Harbour of George the Fourth which seems not to have remained for so long.
  • 1824 - saw over 3,000 boats shelter in the partially completed harbour, but it also saw the beginning of operations off the North Wall which alleviated many of the issues ships were having accessing Dublin Port.
  • 1826 - Kingstown harbour gained the important mail packet service which at the time was under the stewardship of the Admiralty with a wharf completed on the East Pier in the following year. The service was transferred from Howth whose harbour had suffered from silting and the need for frequent dredging.
  • 1831 - Royal Irish Yacht Club founded
  • 1837 - saw the creation of Victoria Wharf, since renamed St. Michael's Wharf with the D&KR extended and a new terminus created convenient to the wharf.[8] The extended line had cut a chord across the old harbour with the landward pool so created later filled in.
  • 1838 - Royal St George Yacht Club founded
  • 1842 - By this time the largest man-made harbour in Western Europe had been completed with the construction of the East Pier lighthouse.
  • 1855 - The harbour was further enhanced by the completion of Traders Wharf in 1855 and Carlisle Pier in 1856. The mid-1850s also saw the completion of the West Pier lighthouse. The railway was connected to Bray in 1856
  • 1871 - National Yacht Club founded
  • 1884 - Dublin Bay Sailing Club founded
  • 1918 - The Mailboat, “The RMS Leinster” sailed out of Dún Laoghaire with 685 people on board. 22 were post office workers sorting the mail; 70 were crew and the vast majority of the passengers were soldiers returning to the battlefields of World War I. The ship was torpedoed by a German U-boat near the Kish lighthouse killing many of those onboard.
  • 1920 - Kingstown reverted to the name Dún Laoghaire in 1920 and in 1924 the harbour was officially renamed "Dun Laoghaire Harbour"
  • 1944 - a diaphone fog signal was installed at the East Pier
  • 1965 - Dun Laoghaire Motor Yacht Club founded
  • 1968 - The East Pier lighthouse station switched from vapourised paraffin to electricity, and became unmanned. The new candle-power was 226,000
  • 1977- A flying boat landed in Dun Laoghaire Harbour, one of the most unusual visitors
  • 1978 - Irish National Sailing School founded
  • 1934 - saw the Dublin and Kingstown Railway begin operations from their terminus at Westland Row to a terminus at the West Pier which began at the old harbour
  • 2001 - Dun Laoghaire Marina opens with 500 berths
  • 2015 - Ferry services cease bringing to an end a 200-year continuous link with Wales.
  • 2017- Bicentenary celebrations and time capsule laid.
  • 2018 - Dun Laoghaire Harbour Company dissolved, the harbour is transferred into the hands of Dun Laoghaire Rathdown County Council

From East pier to West Pier the waterfront clubs are:

  • National Yacht Club. Read latest NYC news here
  • Royal St. George Yacht Club. Read latest RSTGYC news here
  • Royal Irish Yacht Club. Read latest RIYC news here
  • Dun Laoghaire Motor Yacht Club. Read latest DMYC news here

 

The umbrella organisation that organises weekly racing in summer and winter on Dublin Bay for all the yacht clubs is Dublin Bay Sailing Club. It has no clubhouse of its own but operates through the clubs with two x Committee vessels and a starters hut on the West Pier. Read the latest DBSC news here.

The sailing community is a key stakeholder in Dún Laoghaire. The clubs attract many visitors from home and abroad and attract major international sailing events to the harbour.

 

Dun Laoghaire Regatta

Dun Laoghaire's biennial town regatta was started in 2005 as a joint cooperation by the town's major yacht clubs. It was an immediate success and is now in its eighth edition and has become Ireland's biggest sailing event. The combined club's regatta is held in the first week of July.

  • Attracts 500 boats and more from overseas and around the country
  • Four-day championship involving 2,500 sailors with supporting family and friends
  • Economic study carried out by the Irish Marine Federation estimated the economic value of the 2009 Regatta at €2.5 million

The dates for the 2021 edition of Ireland's biggest sailing event on Dublin Bay is: 8-11 July 2021. More details here

Dun Laoghaire-Dingle Offshore Race

The biennial Dun Laoghaire to Dingle race is a 320-miles race down the East coast of Ireland, across the south coast and into Dingle harbour in County Kerry. The latest news on the Dun Laoghaire to Dingle Race can be found by clicking on the link here. The race is organised by the National Yacht Club.

The 2021 Race will start from the National Yacht Club on Wednesday 9th, June 2021.

Round Ireland Yacht Race

This is a Wicklow Sailing Club race but in 2013 the Garden County Club made an arrangement that sees see entries berthed at the RIYC in Dun Laoghaire Harbour for scrutineering prior to the biennial 704–mile race start off Wicklow harbour. Larger boats have been unable to berth in the confines of Wicklow harbour, a factor WSC believes has restricted the growth of the Round Ireland fleet. 'It means we can now encourage larger boats that have shown an interest in competing but we have been unable to cater for in Wicklow' harbour, WSC Commodore Peter Shearer told Afloat.ie here. The race also holds a pre-ace launch party at the Royal Irish Yacht Club.

Laser Masters World Championship 2018

  • 301 boats from 25 nations

Laser Radial World Championship 2016

  • 436 competitors from 48 nations

ISAF Youth Worlds 2012

  • The Youth Olympics of Sailing run on behalf of World Sailing in 2012.
  • Two-week event attracting 61 nations, 255 boats, 450 volunteers.
  • Generated 9,000 bed nights and valued at €9 million to the local economy.

The Harbour Police are authorised by the company to police the harbour and to enforce and implement bye-laws within the harbour, and all regulations made by the company in relation to the harbour.

There are four ship/ferry berths in Dun Laoghaire:

  • No 1 berth (East Pier)
  • No 2 berth (east side of Carlisle Pier)
  • No 3 berth (west side of Carlisle Pier)
  • No 4 berth  (St, Michaels Wharf)

Berthing facilities for smaller craft exist in the town's 800-berth marina and on swinging moorings.

© Afloat 2020

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