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Displaying items by tag: Tarmonbarry

Tarmonbarry’s lifting bridge on the Shannon Navigaton has finally reopened after an extended closure for essential maintenance, Waterways Ireland has confirmed.

Diversions had been in place since early February when the bridge in Co Roscommon was closed for works that eventually required procuring specialist parts from abroad.

The news will come as a relief to southern Shannon boaters who say they have been prevented from participating in rallies in northern reaches due to the closure.

“This has had disastrous consequences for boating on the Shannon so far this season,” one boater told Afloat.ie in recent days. “To date [there has been] very little activity on Lough Ree as boats cannot get down from Carrick, etc, nor can the southern boats make it up north.”

Elsewhere on the inland waterways, Levitstown lifting bridge in Co Kildare on the Barrow Navigation has also reopened following maintenance works.

Published in Inland Waterways

Waterways Ireland advises masters of vessels on and users of the Shannon Navigation that the closure of Tarmonbarry Bridge will be extended until at least Monday 27 May.

This further delay is due to additional repair works requiring specialist components being manufactured and delivered from international suppliers.

The cross-border body for Ireland’s inland waterways says the parts required are essential to the safe operation of the bridge.

A diversion route remains available via the Camlin River with additional staff being deployed to Clondra Lock to aid vessel movements along the Camlin.

Waterways Ireland says it regrets any inconvenience that this may cause and thanks its customers for their cooperation in relation to this matter.

Published in Inland Waterways

Waterways Ireland advises masters of vessels on and users of the Shannon Navigation that the lifting bridge at Tarmonbarry in Co Roscommon will now reopen on Friday 3 May.

This extension of the bridge’s closure since February is a result of additional repair works required following a bridge strike.

The cross-border body for Ireland’s inland waterways says it apologises for extending this closure “but the additional work is essential to ensure the bridge is safely operational in advance of the bank holiday weekend”.

A diversion route remains available via the Camlin River.

Published in Inland Waterways

Waterways Ireland advises all masters of vessels on and users of the Shannon Navigation that the lifting bridge at Tarmonbarry in Co Roscommon will remain closed until at least Thursday 18 April to facilitate essential maintenance works.

Works at Tarmonbarry were previously extended twice since beginning in early February, and a diversion route is available via the Camlin River.

The cross-border body for Ireland’s inland waterways says it regrets any inconvenience that this may cause and thanks its customers for their cooperation.

This story was updated on Wednesday 3 April to include the latest information.

Published in Inland Waterways

Waterways Ireland advises masters of vessels on and users of the Shannon Navigation that diving operations will be taking place at Tarmonbarry Wier from Monday 25 September for a period of approximately one week.

Alpha Flag (Divers Flag) will be flown to indicate the presence of divers in the water. The cross-border body for Ireland’s inland waterways asks masters of vessels to please proceed with additional caution in the area.

Published in Inland Waterways

Waterways Ireland advises all masters of vessels and water users on the Shannon Navigation that Tarmonbarry Bridge and Lock in Co Longford will be closed from Tuesday 10 to Friday 13 May for further emergency repair works.

An alternative route via the Camlin River is available. Masters of vessels and water users are advised to check their airdraft prior to undertaking the passage on this inland waterway due to the low bridge on the N5 road.

Update 11/5: Waterways Ireland says Tarmonbarry Bridge and Lock have now been reopened to navigation. Essential maintenance works are continuing at Tarmonbarry Bridge and some minor delays may be experienced.

Published in Inland Waterways

Waterways Ireland has launched a request for tender for the development of a visitor and tourism plan for the Clondra/Richmond Harbour and Tarmonbarry area at the western end of the Royal Canal.

According to the RFT, the intended plan “will chart and identify the recreational and tourism interventions required to boost tourism, recreation and economic regeneration in the area”.

Among its objectives are “to take an integrated development approach to conserve, develop and promote [the area] as a significant recreation/tourism destination in the centre of Ireland”, and “to set out a clear, realistic and achievable tourism vision…over a 10-year period”.

In addition, any plan “must be compatible with the environmental designation and zoning” of the localities covered on this part of the inland waterway.

A particular focus for Waterways Ireland will be to “protect and restore one of our heritage assets” — namely the old lock keeper’s house at Lock 46, which dates from the early 19th century.

The deadline for receipt of tender applications is 3pm on Thursday 13 January 2022. More details can be found on the eTenders website HERE.

Published in Inland Waterways

The re-opening of Tarmonbarry Lock on the Shannon Navigation has been extended until Wed 1 Apr 2015. Further information may be had by contacting Waterways Ireland's Carrick-on-Shannon office at 07196-50563 or the lockkeeper at 087-9222020.

Published in Inland Waterways
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Waterways Ireland advises the Lock Gate maintenance at Tarmombarry on the Shannon Navigation has been completed.

Published in Inland Waterways
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About Brittany Ferries

In 1967 a farmer from Finistère in Brittany, Alexis Gourvennec, succeeded in bringing together a variety of organisations from the region to embark on an ambitious project: the aim was to open up the region, to improve its infrastructure and to enrich its people by turning to traditional partners such as Ireland and the UK. In 1972 BAI (Brittany-England-Ireland) was born.

The first cross-Channel link was inaugurated in January 1973, when a converted Israeli tank-carrier called Kerisnel left the port of Roscoff for Plymouth carrying trucks loaded with Breton vegetables such as cauliflowers and artichokes. The story, therefore, begins on 2 January 1973, 24 hours after Great Britain's entry into the Common Market (EEC).

From these humble beginnings however, Brittany Ferries as the company was re-named quickly opened up to passenger transport, then became a tour operator.

Today, Brittany Ferries has established itself as the national leader in French maritime transport: an atypical leader, under private ownership, still owned by a Breton agricultural cooperative.

Eighty five percent of the company’s passengers are British.

Key Brittany Ferries figures:

  • Turnover: €202.4 million (compared with €469m in 2019)
  • Investment in three new ships, Galicia plus two new vessels powered by cleaner LNG (liquefied natural gas) arriving in 2022 and 2023
  • Employment: 2,474 seafarers and shore staff (average high/low season)
  • Passengers: 752,102 in 2020 (compared with 2,498,354 in 2019)
  • Freight: 160,377 in 2020 (compared with 201,554 in 2019)
  • Twelve ships operating services that connect France, the United Kingdom, Ireland and Spain (non-Covid year) across 14 routes
  • Twelve ports in total: Bilbao, Santander, Portsmouth, Poole, Plymouth, Cork, Rosslare, Caen, Cherbourg, Le Havre, Saint-Malo, Roscoff
  • Tourism in Europe: 231,000 unique visitors, staying 2.6 million bed-nights in France in 2020 (compared with 857,000 unique visitors, staying 8,7 million bed-nights in 2019).